OT: Anyone Know Where to get 30-40% H2O2 in Ontario, Canada?

Hi,
Does anyone know where to get 30 to 40% food grade hydrogen peroxide in Ontario, Canada? I've tried the usual drugstores, pharmacies, and
beauty shops but nobody seems to list it.
A local supplier would be great - preferably near Barrie or Midland, Ontario.
Thanks,
Mike Monett
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Whats that used for? I am in Coldwater at least once a year for skydiving/nightime pyro.

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Mike wrote:

Thanks, Mike,
This is for an experiment to dissolve silver. It works great with ordinary 3% H2O2, and produces about 60ppm silver ions in solution.
If the scaling is linear, 35% H2O2 should produce 700ppm.
Silver ions in solution make a very potent antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal substance. Conventional silver electrolysis reaches a limit around 50 to 60 ppm. Some applications would benefit from higher concentration. 700ppm is way too high, but it could easily be diluted down to the desired concentration.
The problem is the stabilizers. I understand different stabilizers are used depending on the grade and intended use. Many of them are probably toxic for human consumption, which is why I am looking for "food grade".
I don't know if this grade actually exists, or what stabilizers are used. Hopefully the experts in this nesgroup can give me better guidance than the numerous conflicting web sites.
Mike Monett
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You could dilute even purer H2O2 to your desired properties.
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
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Jerry Irvine wrote:

Thanks, Jerry,
Do you know if it comes in "food grade"?
Some of the stabilizers used for other grades may be highly toxic if ingested. I don't know what "food grade" means and what stabilizers are used, but hopefully they might be less toxic.
Mike Monett
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It comes about 40%. If you want purer it must be distilled by an expert.
Jerry
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
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Aparently good as an anti vampiral too ;)
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Mike wrote:
[...]

Yes, I haven't seen a single one since I started taking it many years ago. I also haven't seen many dancing elephants either:)
My problem is I have a hypersensitivity to mold toxins due to an overexposure while I was staying in Ottawa recently. The symptoms are severe, disabling, and permanent as far as I can find out from others who have experienced similar problems.
I have used ordinary 20uS cs (1uS = 1ppm) for many years, but it is not strong enough to have any effect on the toxins. I developed a new process to make 50uS cs, and it helps eliminate most of the symptoms. But it needs about 40 hours to make 500mL.
I experimented with 3% H2O2 and found it makes about 60uS cs. The equations involving H2O2 are tricky since oxygen takes an oxidation number of 1 or 2, but the equation may look like this:
2Ag + 2H2O2 --> 2Ag(+) + O2(g) + 2H2O
Compare this with the reaction on silver oxide and silver hydroxide. The reaction is very much faster and it bubbles and fizzes as it gives off oxygen. The equations may look like this:
Ag2O + H2O2 --> 2Ag(+) + O2 + H2O
2AgOH + H2O2 --> 2Ag(+) + O2 + 2H2O
The idea is to try 35% food grade to see if it gives a higher concentration, then dilute it to whatever is needed to deal with the mold toxins.
Mike Monett
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One (slight) trouble with taking silver on a regular basis is the tendency to turn the skin blue. Google for "argyria", and/or "Senator Smurf". Here's one interesting article:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/10/02/MNblue.DTL
- Rick "Caveat emptor" Dickinson
--
"I've always been taught that if you code an arbitrary limit, try to
make it a power of two, or at least avoid powers of ten, so people
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Rick Dickinson wrote:
[...]

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/10/02/MNblue.DTL
Hi Rick,
Yes, that is the well-known Stan Jones, who ingested silver chloride due to adding salt during the electrolysis. The blue tint is partly helped by a reporter's use of an image editor and does not actually represent his true skin color.
Argyria is always mentioned when discussing colloidal silver. However, argyria only occurs with silver compounds, such as silver nitrate (Rosemary Jacobs), silver chloride(Stan Jones), silver acetate, mild silver protein, etc.
The silver ions in ionic silver are rapidly excreted and do not persist in the body. For example, please see Dr. Altman's study on "The Body's Ability to Eliminate Colloidal Silver", at
http://www.silvermedicine.org/altmanstudy.html
Also a quote from Jason's page on argyria:
"Fact: There has yet to be one single case of argyria attributed to the use of isolated colloidal silver, with a PPM Silver ranging between 5 - 20, regardless of the quantity and frequency ingested. Every reported case of argyria that we have found was eventually traced back to a silver salt, silver protein, or other poorly made, compound-rich product."
http://www.silvermedicine.org/argyria.html
The body does not know how to handle compounds, which can build up and cause argyria.
Here's some more examples.
The first is not mentioned in current argyria lists. I really don't know what this guy took, but it must have been extremely concentrated. Perhaps it was silver nitrate, due to the similarity with Rosemary Jacobs.
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/pharmacy/WebPage/News_CorrespondenceHTML/alert2.htm
The next one is also not mentioned in current lists.
Note they claim he took 450ppm colloidal silver. It is impossible to make ionic silver with a concentration above 60ppm, and most generators won't go past 20ppm. So he did not get his argyria from colloidal silver. He may have added salt during electrolysis like Stan Jones. This makes silver chloride, a compound of silver known to cause argyria.
http://dermatology.cdlib.org/111/case_reports/argyria/wadhera.html
I hope this helps.
Mike Monett
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Rick Dickinson wrote:

"Senator
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/10/02/MNblue.DTL
LOL! What's sad about this article is that the guy is a "part-time college instructor", yet he got suckered by both the Y2K hysteria and this snake-oil nonsense. Shouldn't college instructors be required to pass an intelligence test before being hired??
i
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/10/02/MNblue.DTL
Just remember your post when the next asian flu pandemic hits.
Silver ions are antiviral. Probably the only thing that could save your life, since you won't have any immunity, there won't be any vaccines, and the products of medical science have little or no effect against viruses. They can't even cure the common cold!
But you will never get a cold or the flu while taking porperly prepared colloidal silver. Get at least 20uS ionic concentration. It works.
Mike Monett
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Post the final answer.
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
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Shouldn't you?
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
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Mike Monett wrote:

Dissolving silver? Sounds more like H202 rockets to me.... As I recall, they use H2O2 and silver screens.
-Kevin
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Mike Monett wrote:

If you want stabilizer-free H2O2 in 30-50% concentration, try to find "semiconductor" grade, which is ultra-pure, since semiconductor processes can be very sensitive to trace contaminants.
I'm a little skeptical about your silver-in-solution plan... the silver ions will probably catalyze the H2O2 to decompose. (If you want dilute silver-bearing solutions, can you use an aqueous solution of silver nitrate, or will the nitrate ion cause problems?)
-dave w
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David Weinshenker wrote:
[...]

That is very good info - thanks!

I tried ordinary 3% and got a concentration of about 60uS (60ppm). I let the process run until the bubbles stopped, which took several days.
I believe the equation is
2Ag + 2H2O2 --> 2Ag(+) + O2(g) + 2H2O
I added pickling salt to a small amount of the resulting solution, and got a solid white dispersion of silver chloride. It was consistent with a silver ion concentration of 60ppm.
The equation is
Ag(+) + NaCl --> AgCl(ppt) + Na(+)
I then added 2mL of ammonia. The white dispersion disappeared, indicating the silver chloride dissolved in the ammonia. There are several possible equations, but they follow the form:
AgCl(s) + 2NH3 --> Ag(NH3)2(+)(aq) + Cl(-)
AgCl(s) + 2NH4OH --> Ag(NH3)2(+)(aq) + Cl(-) + 2H2O
The above tests are specific to the silver ion and indicate the presense and strength of the ion concentration.
So it is clear the H2O2 dissolved the silver into ions. They apparently did not cause the H2O2 to decompose, since the process ran for a very long time before the bubbles stopped.
Actually, they never really stopped. If you look at the silver under a stereo zoom microscope, you could still see small bubbles. But I gave up waiting for them to stop completely. So there was still some H2O2 left at the end of the run. This indicates the H2O2 has to be in actual contact with the silver for the reaction to occur.
Silver nitrate is not suitable for ingestion. It is much, much less effective than plain silver ions, and it may cause argyria. I discussed this in a related post.
Thank you for the excellent info on semiconductor grade. It has to be expensive, but it may be perfect for this application.
Good show, David.
Mike Monett
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Isn't silver something like $5 or $7 an ounce?
Retail?
Jerry
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Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
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Jerry Irvine wrote:

Hi Jerry,
You use so little silver that a set of electrodes may cost $10 and last for years. I get my silver from monsterslayer. They have no minimum order, but the shipping cost to Canada is outrageous:
http://www.monsterslayer.com/MiscPages/SilverBG.htm
With the simple 3 nines cs generator commonly used, you can calculate how much silver you drank. The rods wear down to points after long use and take a uniform cone shape.
Consider the volume of a cylinder is
Cyl = pi * r1 * r1 * h
and the volume of a cone
Cone = 1/3 * pi * h * (r1^2 + r1 * r2 + r2^2)
where
h = height of cone p1 = 3.14159... r1 = first radius r2 = second radius
The amount of silver used is Cyl - Cone.
The diameter of 12 ga wire is 0.0808 inch and the tips were worn down to 0.024 inch dia over a distance of 4 inches. There are two identical electrodes. Silver has a density of 10.5 grams per cubic centimeter.
Normally, calculations like this are highly prone to error due to the numerous metric conversions needed. However, a program called "Mercury" written by Roger Schafly does the necessary calculations for you. It only needs are the conversion factors and the input parameters and it will figure out what you want and solve the equations for you.
In my example, the amount of silver drank was 0.361 cubic centimeters, which weighs 3.79 grams. (Calculations are below.)
Consider the published data indicates the amount of silver needed to produce argyria is 2 grams. I have ingested nearly twice that amount and am still as rosy-cheeked as the day I was born, 63 years ago.
Well, almost, anyway:)
Mike Monett
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Mercury Calculations ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ; Volume of Cylinder Minus Truncated Cone
; Roger Schafly's Mercury is available at ; http://www.mindspring.com/~schlafly/eureka.htm ; http://archives.math.utk.edu/software/msdos/calculus/mrcry209/.html ; http://archives.math.utk.edu/software/msdos/calculus/mrcry209/mrcry209.zip
; 1 cubic inch = 16.387064 millilitres ; 1 millilitre = 1 cubic centimeters ; silver weighs 10.5 grams per cubic centimeter
Unit Conversions ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Ag = 10.5 * cc cc = 16.387064 * CuIn * 2 Cone = 1/3 * pi * h * (r1^2 + r1 * r2 + r2^2) CuIn = Cyl - Cone Cyl = pi * r1 * r1 * h
r1 = d1 / 2        ; radius of first diameter r2 = d2 / 2        ; radius of second diameter
Input Parameters ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ d1 = 0.0808        ; original diameter d2 = 0.024        ; tip diameter after years of use h = 4        ; height of cone
Solution ~~~~~~~~ Ag = 3.7990 cc = 0.3618 Cone = 0.0094 CuIn = 0.0110 Cyl = 0.0205 d1 = 0.0808 d2 = 0.0240 h = 4.0000 r1 = 0.0404 r2 = 0.0120
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You want a chemical supplier, not a consumer store.
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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