Pimp Daddy Rocketry OOP??

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This really jerks my chain. These outfits you think would have the decency to announce they are no longer are going to be doing business for whatever reason. I can appreciate that other priorities take precedence and they can no longer service customers. The latest big failure is DG&A rocketry. The main page will come up but all the links are 404. Wonder if they are going under too.
Reply to
Kurt
I got a 403 (forbidden) error, so it could be anything from they used up their bandwidth quota for the month, to no payment on their ISP bill, to screwed-up server side scripting.
roy nar12605
Reply to
Roy Green
Their forum is still up. It's hosted on the same server so I figure someone broke something on the main site.
formatting link
Reply to
Matt
Whoa,
I did get an orbital transport from him along with a clone of the Gemini Titan rocket. Nice kits. Arizona Experimental Propulsion Systems made a hasty exit from the field but at least had the decency to make a posting announcing their demise. The owner Norman Egolf posted he had to close down and lord knows I feel sorry for him. I bought two large Ex motors from him and they are very fine. Honored my order even after he made the announcement. I did read where one fellow didn't receive product but hope that issue was worked out.
Kurt
Reply to
Kurt
Gosh Darrell,
I hope you're wrong but with the engine situation that way it is, rocketry popularity could begin to plummet even before the lawsuit is resolved. The smaller suppliers could indeed bite the dust like you are predicting. I don't want that but things may get really hard to participate in HPR if we don't get any relief on the lawsuit side.
Kurt
Reply to
Kurt
Hey, I agree. The kits I got a look at were nice. "Pimp Daddy Rocketry" just seems funny to me, as a name for a rocket company.
BTW, sure hope those two EX motors you bought were just cases or chemical kits. ATF kind of frowns on selling ready made EX loads or motors.. Remember, big brother is watching.(:-)
Fred
Reply to
W. E. Fred Wallace
Kurt,
First, you have to approach the hobby like you are going to be here to stay no matter what the regulatory environment. If that means getting a permit, then go get a permit. Treat the results of the lawsuit as a non-event: if we win, great. If we lose, it doesn't affect your flying. Regulatory relief for APCP does nothing for regulated recovery or ignition components.
Second, with the way sales have been in the 3rd quarter of this year and they way they are working out in the 4th quarter, some companies are going to be pulling up their tent stakes. I wish it weren't true, but those are the facts. It's just the law of supply and demand.
It doesn't help that almost everybody that comes into the hobby thinks they have great rocket designs that would sell like hotcakes if they just put the designs into production. The barrier to entry in this hobby is very low for anyone who wants to join the cottage industry. The result is naturally going to be a lot of attrition.
Reply to
Darrell D. Mobley
The issue is the regulation is too strict. People are less likely to enter into the HPR hobby with the current LEUP requirements. Quite frankly alot of folks are not in the situation of being able to successfully apply for a permit and have no recourse for contingency.
I contend that allowing modelers to keep some APCP on hand is no safety hazard. Let's face it, there is a large number who have done that successfully for years. So many have pointed out that the ATFE is not willing to negotiate and that time has passed. The ATFE may rightly feel they have the upper hand and will win the lawsuit. If HPR loses, sure there will always be serious folks who will partake of the hobby but I think the potential for growth will be bleaker.
Kurt
Reply to
Kurt
There is no reason to keep APCP on hand unless you fly alone. A club with a magazine and an appointed gatekeeper is sufficient.
Reply to
Darrell D. Mobley
Horsecrap.
1. The one reason you listed, if you EVER desire to fly alone (which, unlike SCUBA diving, is often done). 2. There may be a shortage of the type of engine that you desire with your local vendors, and you need to get them from another vendor. 3. Local vendors don't necessarily show up to every launch. 4. Rumor has it that fires can occur at manufacturers, which can create a shortage of certain motors. Thus, some folks like to have motors on hand, as a 'just in case'. 5. You may be launching a 'special project', and require a larger-than-normal number of certain motors. 6. A vendor might stop manufacturing motors that you prefer, so you 'stock up' for the long term. 7. You might be doing a TARC-like competition, and want to have a batch of motors that have a consistent lot number, so that you can remove that variable from your competition problems.
and last but not least,
8. You might simply understand that unless it can be proven that there is an OVERRIDING REASON for government involvement, that here in America we tend to believe that people are allowed to pursue their individual pursuits without government interference.
I'm sure that other folks might be able to add to this list, especially since I just came up with them off the top of my head...
David Erbas-White
Reply to
David Erbas-White
That you for making my point. Every reason you mentioned could be accomplished with a club magazine and an appointed gatekeeper. There is no need to have APCP at your house. That doesn't disregard that some may "want" to have APCP at their house, but there is no need. For every scenario you can come up, other than being a felon, I can come up with an alternative scenario to having APCP at your house, i.e. "on hand".
Reply to
Darrell D. Mobley

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