typhoons

I thought typhoons were bad, seems like Hurricanes do more damage or something. I saw on discovery a while ago that typhoons tends to be stronger
since they have more space to get strong. But I guess its because of the geography (we have a chain of mountains to the east that blocks most the wind, but people in the east coast are still hammered hard) Only like 650,000 without power, most have came back on though. I think there were a few casualties too. So just one question, if hurricanes do so much damage why not build stronger houses (like reinforced concrete) instead of building stuff out of wood? I mean theres like no earthquakes in parts of the states that gets hurricanes anyways. In Taiwan we get hurt more in earthquakes than typhoons...
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tai fu wrote:

My parents place in FL is built like you mentioned. Metal roof and all. Ok, I'm going to admit my ignorance, what exactly is a typhoon? Always thought it was a different name for a hurricane.
Ted Novak TRA#5512 IEAS#75
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stronger
a
damage
building
states
than
Or a Cyclone.
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the notorious t-e-d wrote:

I always thought that if such a storm originated in the Atlantic, it was a "hurricane". If it originated in the Pacific, then it was a "typhoon". If that is indeed true, is there a "name" for such storms in the Indian Ocean?
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The Meriam Webster Online Dictionary defines a typhoon as a tropical cyclone in the region of the Phillipines or China Sea. The definition gives some insight into the origin of the word Typhoon, and it seems to be traced back to the Greeks and Chines.
FYI, Meriam Webster defines hurricane as a tropical cyclone with winds in excess of 74 knots (or is it mph?), generally occuring in the Western Atlantic.
Regards, Jeff Dragons Slain, Damsels Rescued No Dragon too Small, No Maiden too fair, No Reward too large
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Typhoons and Hurricanes are the same phenomenon, the only difference is the name. Typhoons occur in the pacific, west of the international dateline. Any tropical cyclone in the pacific (east of the dateline) or atlantic is called a hurricane. Storms in the Indian Ocean are just called cyclones.
The strongest and largest tropical cyclone ever recorded was Typhoon Tip, with winds of 195 MPH and a diameter of over 1300 miles (with storm force winds extending 675 miles from the center). If superimposed over the USA, it would cover everything from the California coast to western Nebraska.
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I should also add that Tip had the lowest pressure ever recorded at sea level: 25.69" of Mercury.
It is also theoretically possible for a Typhoon to become a Hurricane (or vice versa) if it crosses the dateline.
The source for all this info comes from the NOAA and National Weather Service websites.
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Wow -- when was that?

Hmmm... my understanding is that the difference is the place of origin. If it moves across the dateline, it doesn't change status.

Do you have a more precise URL than that?
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Typhoon Tip occured in October of 1979.
Hurricane FAQ: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/tcfaqHED.html
The factoid about the name changes across the dateline can be found at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/E6.html
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Thanks
Interesting! I didn't know that...
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Joseph J. Pfeiffer, Jr., Ph.D. Phone -- (505) 646-1605
Department of Computer Science FAX -- (505) 646-1002
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Cyclone is the generic name for an organized circular wind pattern.
A tropical cyclone is the generic term for a non-frontal synoptic scale low-pressure system over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection.
For a tropical cyclone, if winds reach 33 m/s / 64 kt / > 74 MPH, then they are called: a "hurricane" (the North Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Pacific Ocean east of the dateline, or the South Pacific Ocean east of 160E); a "typhoon" (the Northwest Pacific Ocean west of the dateline); a "severe tropical cyclone" (the Southwest Pacific Ocean west of 160E or Southeast Indian Ocean east of 90E); a "severe cyclonic storm" (the North Indian Ocean); and a "tropical cyclone" (the Southwest Indian Ocean)
-- David

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