What should the ultimate rocket shop have?

You have hit some of the other issues (cons).
- All rooms should have some form of ventilation. Closed up rooms are not
healthy. - It does take longer than other methods to get up to temp, but maintaining that temp is cheaper afterwards. It is NOT ideal in rooms that are direct access to major temp differences... in other words, basements good, entryway within 12 feet bad, unless you have an entryway supplemental heater.
In the right application, it is great and saves $.
I was merely responding to:

Radiant heat can be taken from many sources, (heat pumps, hot water lines, attic exchangers, etcetera), and does not necessarily need open flame or heating element. But in my opinion is NOT a whole house/building solution. I would not recommend it for a shop either.
On your Scout building problem, due to high traffic, they should add a double entry door with a heat blower rated only for the entryway space. This would solve the heat-loss problem and still be cheaper than operational costs of central heating the whole place. The last problem is the wood boiler... I can see why you don't want to keep 'stoking the stove' when nobody is home. They need a different heater source that can throttle on need to keep warm but not constantly on.
My 2 cents.
I personally would use heated floors only in a basement that is at least 3 feet deep.
~ Duane Phillips.
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The server stack in my home office. Three machines, two UPS, two routers, and their associated power supplies generate plenty of heat.
Just build yourself a server farm!
Chuck W Sharc, NAR Section 613 www.flysharc.org
Sharc, the section where two out of three certification flights always work just fine!
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Definitely a metal lathe - not sure if you'd get away with just a small hobby one though, but definitely a plus for fabbing your own custom bits. If you're planning on doing a fair bit of lathework, make sure you get an automatic cooling fluid pump system on the lathe - not that expensive, and it'll save hassle of having to apply fluid at a moment when you've probably just run out of available hands.
I'd also suggest a good amount of shelving & storage space too, and whatever you do, don't forget to leave aside an area where you can store your fleet away from working areas.
Plenty of power sockets, you'll find you always need one more than you have:-) Also, how about a PC of some description with Rocksim & a cad package on it?
Someplace to sit & drink coffee is a good idea also - you can always 'park' visitors there while you get on with work :-)
If you have room, how about a spraying booth & compressor too?
G.
--
Graham J. Platt
graham (a) bowhunter (d) demon (d) co (d) uk
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My new garage is underway. The floor just got poured today!! YEEHAW!
http://home.alltel.net/jm44316/1031051.JPG
Facilities are just important as tools! I plan on investing in insulation everywhere. I recommend not skimping on the wiring, and having a few 220V outlets. A 100 amp service would be good. Good lighting is a must. Get good light fixtures, and ones that can handle cold weather. (if fluorescent) Epoxy floor paint is nice too. Having a phone and a beer fridge would be a bonus!
Beyond that, some sort of ventilation system/spray booth would be a plus for painting.
--
Joe Michel
NAR 82797 L2
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Good ideas. Can't ever have too much. Run multiple circuits. One of the things on my Round Tuit list is perimeter outlets on 2 seperate circuits: one always on (where I can plug in things like battery chargers and such), the other switched along with the lights for things I don't want to accidentally leave on (like the soldering iron or monokote iron). Plus dedicated outlets for all the big devices. My kitchen actually has 10 breakers to feed everything there. A big shop should be similar.

Good point. I didn't recall where Brian lived, but flourescents don't liek the cold. Unless you're going to heat the shop 24x365 you need lights that will work when its cold.

Another good idea. I did this on the basement floor when I built the house. The only drawback is that water spills naturally wick into concrete now puddle up and leave slippery spots. I really want to do the same thing to the garage, but that involves moving EVERYTHING out, etchig the floor, then painting, then replacing 15 years worth of junk. MUCH easier to do before you fill it up, like I did with the basement.

Fridge near the TV!
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined. -- Patrick Henry, speech of June 5 1788
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There are some fluorescent ballasts that are rated for cold weather. In my current garage, it never gets colder than 40 degrees, so fluorescents are fine. The key to getting good lights (if you want fluorescent) is to open them up before you buy and check and see if they have a nice, big, heavy ballast box in them. Those are the ones that work good. The cheap ones don't have a good ballast, so they buzz and are noisy, plus they don't work when it gets cold.
--
Joe Michel
NAR 82797 L2
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Large size is no longer an indication of a good ballast.
You want electronic ballasts instead of the old magnetic ones. Electronic ballasts are absolutely silent. They are also smaller than magnetic ballasts.
Lowe's and Home Depot both sell flourescent fixtures with electronic ballasts. They cost about an extra $10 or so. Home Depot has an $8 shop light with electronic ballast.
I spent $20 each to replace the ballasts in my existing lights. It would not have been much more to get new lights, but I saw no reason to junk existing fixtures.
Brian Elfert
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kaplow snipped-for-privacy@encompasserve.org.mars (Bob Kaplow) writes:

My electrical plan calls for everything surface mounted to make changes and repairs easy. There will be both 110v and 220v outlets mounted all along the walls along with dedicated circuits for things like the table saw that don't move.

The shop will be heated at least minimally 24x7. Drastic changes in heat cause condensation that rusts cast iron.

My current basement shop has epoxy paint. I am not planning on it in the new shop as I plan on installing a wood floor to be easier on the feet.
Brian Elfert
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writes:

I seriously wonder if that is big enough. A table saw alone, along with its buffer space for handling a 4x8 sheet of wood can take up about 400' by itself.

I don't see a belt sander on the list.
A big metal lathe will set you back some serious $$$, but would be a useful tool.
Definitely a spray booth with exhaust, also for sanding to control the dust.
LOTS of storage cabinets for tools and stuff.
Seriously, hit your local library and find some books on shop layout and steal ideas from there. Dewey Decimal in the 684.xxx range.
--
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
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kaplow snipped-for-privacy@encompasserve.org.mars (Bob Kaplow) writes:

I think the space will be big enough. Besides, the city won't let me go much over 900 sq feet due to lot coverage.
Bigger also costs more. I'm already looking at a $20k cost.

I do have a 12" disc sander for making centering rings and bulkplates, but no belt sander. A belt sander should go on my shopping list.
A metal lath would be nice, but lots of people recommend against mixing metalworking and woodworking. The sparks from metal can ignite saw dust and the cutting fluid can contaminate wood.

Everyone keeps mentioning that. I don't know if it will fit or not.
Brian Elfert
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writes:

Check out Wood Magazine articles on shop design.Every so often,they pick a type of space that a homeowner might convert to a woodworking shop,and redesign it,and invent all sorts of neat ideas for storage and there was a paint booth in one that was fairly compact.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I know some good metalworkers that have both metal working machines and woodworking machines in their shop. A little common sense is required to make it safe. Like don't hook up a grinder to the same dust collector as the wood machines! If you are getting sparks off a lathe you are doing something wrong! These guys also have torches and so far they have not burned the place down yet.
However these guys tend to do a lot less woodwork than metal work and they maintain a very clean shop (ie no sawdust on the floor). If you do a lot more woodwork, I would suggest that you cover the metal lathe to keep it clean. The oil on the metal machines attracts dust which can be a problem because some wood contains acids that promotes rust.
chuck
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You do not get sparks from a metal lathe. If your shop is full of fine wood dust, you are more likely to ignite it with a power switch on any power tool than you are with the metal cutting process.
The main concern I worry about with my shop is the wood dust sticking to the lightly oiled surfaces on the lathe. It is a good idea to wipe it down often, or keep it covered. I actually cut wood on my metal lathe occasionally, and that usually results in a thorough cleaning. But it's not as bad as graphite.
Oh - if you do choose to make EX hardware, you're going to want a bandsaw. I use a regular bandsaw with a metal blade, but if you have the room and the funds, you can get a bandsaw specifically for metal.
-- David
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My primary hobby is metalworking. I recommend hanging out in the metalworking newsgroup if you are seriously interested in learning about metalworking and to get leads on what to buy and where to look. You might even find someone local to help you out if they are also interested in rockets. FYI, I built estes kits in the 1960s as a kid. Lost most of them. Loved the X-Ray.

I highly recommend one. They are great for shaping G10 fins. I use my 1 inch the most for general work. A 2 inch might be more appropiate for rocket work.
I would also recommend a band saw.
chuck
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Couple of things that would go in my ultimate rocket shop
1. Those retractable extension cords mounted at strategic locations above every work surface.
2. A deep sink
3. Beyond the benches, lots of shelving . 4. A bathroom - I hate the middle age sprint...

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Al Gloer wrote:

I built myself a second full size work bench, and I'll never go back.
--
-strudle

"I leave punk rock on for my cats so they'll get more hardcore while I'm
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too small!
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