DML Panther F

Hey guys,
I've been making a concerted effort as of late to get the "been started"
pile finished. So far, I have 8 at the wash and paint stage. Enough of
that though, back to the topic at hand.
Yesterday I started working on my 1/35th DML Panther F, that's been in my
stash at least 5 years if not more. In fact, I'm pretty sure I bought this
kit when it first came out. When I started on it, I noticed that the sprues
are made out of what looks like 2 different kinds of plastic. The upper
hull, turret assembly, steel road wheels, track links, and rear hull plate
all seem to be made with a light gray plastic that looks like it is harder
and more brittle. It pretty much looks like the same styrene they used for
the earlier kits, like the Hetzer.
On the other hand, the "A" sprue, which includes the lower hull, suspension
arms, drive spockets, idler wheels, rubber road wheels, and many detail
parts are made out of a darker gray plastic that feels soft and seems to
have some give to it.
Has anyone else noticed this?
TIA
Jim
Reply to
Jim
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I believe the early DML Panther F, used the lower parts from the Italeri Panther kit, mixed with new DML parts. That explains the difference in the look and quality of the parts trees. DML's "Imperial" 9000-series kits were a mixture of DML parts mixed with parts from other manufacturer's kits.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Williams
Thanks Dave.
I thought that the lower hull looked rather familiar. I did at one time have an Italeri Panther.
Reply to
Jim
I think the "donor" kit was the old Gunze Sangyo Panther, one of those early High-Tech kits with PE and white metal parts.
KL
"Jim" wrote
Reply to
Kurt Laughlin
Nope, not in this case. DML's Panther Gs and Jagdpanthers were ex-Gunze kits, but the Panther F, kit 9008, used the Italeri hull. The hull sprue in the DML kit has the marking "270A" on it. Italeri's 1/35 Panther A kit is #270.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Williams
I can confirm that as well, as I thought that it was odd seeing "270A" on the hull sprue. Plus, this sprue had the engine access hatch, and the same engine hose as the Italeri kit. Since that kit had a partial engine compartment. The upper hull of the Panther F has the same engine access hatch molded as part of the upper hull.
Reply to
Jim
I didn't notice any difference in my kit's plastic. But be forewarned that the Dragon turret is wrong in its angles and dimensions--the cupola doesn't even have the right number of periscopes. I had to completely rebuild mine. In retrospect, it would have been easier to buy a resin turret and mate it to a Tamiya or Dragon Panther G and give this kit a pass completely. Still if you have it in hand, consider using the kit's rubber tired wheels, as previous experience had shown the steel wheels were incompatible with the standard pattern tracks, causing many breakages on the center guides. The called-for redesign of the Panther track never came about due to the war situation. Also, there are several changes needed to the Dragon upper hull-- the joint on the front roof armor needs to be moved further back, and the hinges for the drivers' hatches need to be eliminated-the F model hatches lifted completely out. If you want accurate drawings in 1/35th scale, the Thomas Jentz book on the Panther published by Schiffer has superb ones covering all Panther variants.
Reply to
Gerald Owens
Thanks Gerald,
I'm mainly just building this to get it out of my been started que. This thing is mainly just for having a sample, and something to practice my airbrushing on, as somewhere along the line I've lost my touch. I figure a good 6 to 8 kits, mostly old DML with all the ejector pin marks in bad places, needing paint would be a good start.
Reply to
Jim
Well I got this dog to the wash and paint stage. Must say that DML's implementation of the exhaust brackets left a lot to be desired. They were PE parts, which I had no problems with on the Pz IVJ and the initial version of the Pz IV L/70. Anyway, the first bracket broke at the weak point created by one of the placement holes. After some test fitting of the steel wheels, I decided to take Gerald's advice and use the rubber tired road wheels. But sense this is all part of my attempt to regain my airbrushing touch, and the fact it was in my stash it will serve it's purpose. Having said that, I won't buy another copy of this kit. Instead I buy a resin turret and a Tamiya Panther G.
Is there an actual surviving Panther F, in a museum somewhere?
Reply to
Jim
: : said that, I won't buy another copy of this kit. Instead I buy a resin : turret and a Tamiya Panther G. : And and all of the DML "Imperial Series" kits must be approached with caution.
That being said, the DML Panther kits are very nice kits. And, if you are looking for a "D" or an "A" model, DML is really the only option (the Italieri kit is soooo bungled).
Don't let the "F" kit sour your to their other kits, but do take heed the next time you consider a 9000 series kit.
Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Burden
Thanks Bruce.
I'm more soured to this particular kit. I've been eyeballing their Tigers, and T34/76. I won the T34/85 in a second chance raffle at a model contest.
Reply to
Jim
The T-34's are gems. The "Panther F" is really not all that bad....it is a "fun" kit to build; if you are not too concerned about historical accuracy. Given that the actual vehicle was kind of on the border-line between "historical", and "hypothetical"; I would not be overly concerned about its accuracy. It has its place...as the aforementioned "fun" kit. And comparing it to Dragon's earliest kits...it is not all that bad. Need we mention the Dragon T-72 kits? Or the ridiculously over-engineered BMP kits?
:o)
Reply to
Greg Heilers
I haven't bought any of the new DML kits. I haven't bought very many kits period lately other than the Tamiya T-55, and the Marder III. The latter because I thought it was the one I had a gun barrel for. Has DML fixed the little problem of ejector pin marks on the detail side of kit parts? For example the Hetzer had the ejector pin marks on the top side of the fenders. Since the fenders have the raised ribs on them, I'm not going to bother with filling them.
Anyway, I'm trying different paints as well, so it's all going to be a good relearning experience.
Reply to
Jim
The sole surviving Panther F turret was located almost 30 years ago on a British Army firing range at Larkhill, where it was propped on top of a Conqueror hull and used as a target. The Bovington museum recovered it, and enough of it survived for Hilary Louis Doyle (and probably others as well) to get accurate dimensions for drawings. Last I heard, it was not on public display. Unfortunately, Dragon used inaccurate drawings dating from before the turret was discovered. No F hulls survive, but factory drawings and photos do. See the Thomas Jentz book on the Panther published by Schiffer for accurate drawings. At least four F hulls were on the assembly line outside of Berlin in April 1945, but the delivery records show only G models being issued, except for the final four days before the factory shut down, when no records were kept. However, it doesn't appear any F turrets were onhand (the Carl Zeiss coincidence rangefinders, the Schmal turret's raison d'etre, were never delivered).
Reply to
Gerald Owens
I just posted some pics of my interpritation of a Panther F useing the Tamiya G hull and an Accurate Aurmour turret on the alt.binaries.models.scale news group
Gondor
Reply to
Gondor

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