Lessons re-learned

You know, I was taught to cut always towards myself: but only when doing chipping actions, because of the strong control the hand has in that position -- the forearm will not move, unlike if the action is outwards.
When cutting in an unfrozen position, where the forearm will move, then of course one needs to clear the arc of the sythe. Which we all do, of course, after the first scars!
Reply to
Gernot Hassenpflug
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Yup, agreed. Good points.
Reply to
Gernot Hassenpflug
With a sharp object, pleeese, we're not that dumb! I've done that with a nice heavy metal bracket in the workshop. Once. Couldn't walk for a day. Instinct can save you or maim you :-) It pays to have the brain in gear at all times.
Reply to
Gernot Hassenpflug
Oh, the danger element. Hands and knees on the floor with a flashlight, once in awhile I forget that I'm under the work bench and wham! That one is rare, though. Decades crawling around in airplanes taught me the dangers of overhead hazards.
Tom
There were several school buses that went to the scrapper with inside dents where a certain big dummy bounced his cranium off the ceiling. Then there was that one beam in my parents' basement that was just that inch lower than the others. No wonder I learned to slouch when I walked despite all those suggestions I straighten up. Fortunately I now follow those guidelines and only have to keep that one steel I-beam in this basement in mind. At least the air ducts have insulation wrapped around them and they don't hurt 'as much'. BTW, to keep this from straying, I found that I would never fit well in a B-17. It was only aft of the bomb bay that I could get out of a crouch.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
*Specifically for use in a '65 Ford.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr. ;)
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
I've actually gotten quite good at retrieving itsy bitsy parts. The trick (for me at least) is to freeze completely the moment something drops, and track its path by sight. Then very slowly and carefully get up, get down, and retrieve it. Not perfect, but successrate is something in the order of 35%.
Never use a flashlight myself. When tracking is lost, I scan the floor by _very_ gently moving my hand over the surface. Anything hard will be found that way. Of course, hard may include sharp, so this is not a technique to find needles and such..
Rob
Reply to
Rob van Riel
Which reminds me. First lesson learned when I married Lynne, who is Jewish: Never take a top from a mol (sp?).
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
What hair? ;-)
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
Kidding aside I think there's a virus going around (the UK) which makes people accident prone? The other day I walked into a lampost and slipped off a kerb (twice) while stone-cold sober. The last time anything like that happened was after I had a tenanus shot.
(kim)
Reply to
kim

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