New Trumpter Ship??

Hi,Ho guys
Heard a rumor that Trumpter is coming out with a 350th Liberty ship.
Any truth???? or just wishful thinking??
greg
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They announced - maybe a year ago - I think its due for later this year. It's listed on the squadron page with no price yet.
Val Kraut

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hmmm, trampin one out should be pretty cool. some real sad asses came into boston harbor as late as the 60's, i think. early 60's...i think i saw a faded red scheme.
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its been on several Trumpeter lists, but no release date.
Craig

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Why wait and pay 4 times more? You know the Trumpeter kit will be over $100 and add more for photoetch.
Halinski has a state-of-the-art Liberty Ship in cardstock for about $30. Designed with the latest high-tech CAD/CAM/CAE and with tons of 3-D rendered and shaded assembly drawings, this thing has thousands of parts to fill up your creative hours. It is printed on quality paper with gorgeous 4-color offset printing. And no painted is needed; just a sharp eye, some magic marker for the white cut edges, a sharp knife and some white glue.
It is the USS Jeremiah O'Brien in 1/200th scale and with a good construction job will equal or exceed resin or plastic in detail and realism. As a bonus, you get a very nice ORP Krakowiak (British Hunt Class Destroyer Escort). You can use the DE as a "warm up" project.
You can buy the JOB here ......
http://www.lighthousemodelart.com /
Click "Navy Ships" and then "Halinski." Prices are in Canadian Dollars. While there, pick up the USS Gambier Bay listed just below the JOB. Both models are superlative. I do have them both and can testify to this fact. When will I build them? Hah, these models are so inexpensive that I currently have a three lifetime supply that slides nicely under my bed in that magazine format. At bedtime I can grab one or two and flip the pages until the sandman calls.
You own yourself a favor to check these out. Any pre-conceptions about cardstock models that you may have from the old Wilhelmshavener models or the Communist era Polish models are obsolete.
An in-box review of the JOB is found here .....
http://www.cardmodelers.org/archive/jun03/firstlooks.html
and the Gambier Bay here .....
http://www.cardmodelers.org/archive/oct03/firstlooks.html
Trust me. Rather then just sit on my suggestion, I suggest buying them sight un-seen. They are that inexpensive. You cannot go wrong. At the worst, you will have a nice painting guide for the Trumpeter, for less money then those "research books" at the hobby shop.
And no, I have no financial interest in this at all. I just want to share my jaw dropping enthusiasm for these tremendous models.
Save money! Keep toxic chemicals out of your house! Biodegradable! Easy storage for unbuilt models! Easy to move if you sell your house! Scan parts into your computer for backup in case you mess a part up! Reprint them on your inkjet. Support our latest NATO membership from Central Europe! All paint/color research has been performed for you in advance (neat dazzle on Gambier Bay, and that flight deck! Oh my! The wood cargo hatches on the JOB, you got to see them). Get a sense of pride that scratch builders enjoy. Bask in glory at your next model club meeting when all the (broke) plastic junkies exclaim, "I cannot believe that is paper!"
While at the Internet store, buy the IJN Yukikaze that is just below the Gambier Bay. Another winner.
Vess Irvine Estes Park, Colorado

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maybe when i get my plastic skills near good enough....
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A modeler on a Polish newsgroup has started building the Gambier Bay. A running picture story has been started. So far only a few air group planes have been built.
You may want to see how the F4Fs and TBMs look in 1/200th. Keep in mind the small scale for such airplanes. Each of these planes is about 20 parts in paper. Each plane in the air group has a different ID number.
A full flight deck of such planes will look suitably cluttered.
See here ......
http://www.kartonwork.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?t 89&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
Vess
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Vess Irvine wrote:

http://www.kartonwork.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?t 89&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
Pfft! That's not so great - he forgot the relief tubes!
--
Joe of Castle Jefferson
http://www.mindspring.com/~jjstrshp
  Click to see the full signature.
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Heck, I have a hard time folding a letter... let alone this stuff!! They look great and I have seen them online before. Another issue is display. They are big!!
On Sun, 4 Apr 2004 01:41:51 -0700, "Vess Irvine"

Lance Mertz Ketchikan, Alaska Toujours Prete http://www.kpunet.net/~lmertz Remove Nospam in email address to respond.
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Hi Lance:
Yes, a 1/200th cardstock Liberty Ship is a big model. An aircraft carrier? Bigger still.
But they are also light weight. From what I have seen, many modelers will put up inexpensive and structurally weak "shelving" screwed onto a nearby wall, with little concern about the plaster being unable to support the weight.
This is not something one can do easily with a resin model.
Airplanes in 1/33rd scale, like the GPM B-29 I am looking at right now? Hang them from the ceiling, again feasible because of the light weight.
Think of this benefit of the larger size. You will crowd out all the other models on the display table at the IPMS contests. This is sure to get the judge's attention.
But yes, there are many reasons one can use to discount the attractiveness of building one of these terrific models. I am saying the benefit of quality realism, inexpensive cost, easy storage of your stash, excuse to learn some really neat computer software (Photoshop, Rhino 3D), safe chemical exposure, massive library of subjects and avoidance of the whole paint and decal thing are reasons enough to at least go out and plunk down $20 - $30 to take a look.
So I would suggest not letting "issues" get in the way of your curiosity. There are tons of issues. One of the biggest is the large number of parts. A 4,000 part model is a serious undertaking. The new 1/250th Prinz Eugen from CFM (Germany) has over 7,000 parts. Gads.
And not even touched on is the fire hazard in your home. Yes, I too can find issues that say, "don't look into this."
Order the Gambier Bay and even if it never gets built, you are guaranteed to find value for the money spent in just marveling at the human ingenuity behind such a model. The Halinski USS Gambier Bay is probably the best US Navy ship model out there today. The JOB is second best.
Rumor is that GPM is redoing their older USS Missouri model in 1/200th, using the latest CAD/CAM/CAE technology. Could this become king of the hill of US Navy subjects?
And where else are you going to find an excuse to learn to read Polish? LOL.
Vess Irvine Estes Park, Colorado

.
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Perfectly acceptable and recommend if you can justify a reason for the plastic frames; for example, if you need a waterproof model. Or, if you are having a problem with warping, then plastic may be the solution. Or if you really anticipate some rough handling of the model.
The downside of plastic frames are
1) cost 2) harder to cut out 3) Unbendible for situations where the cardstock is indicated to be curved and formed to a non-flat shape
From a pure strength point of view, using cardstock frames is adequate. These models are quite strong if they are designed correctly.
If you do use plastic, make sure the thickness of the plastic matches the designer's instructions perfectly. If the instructions say laminate the parts to 1 mm cardstock, that 1 mm is designed into the mathematical geometry of the model.
The paper models of recent vintage are designed very precisely in tolerance. Arn't computes great for this stuff?
..../Vess

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says...

Because I've seen some pretty damn awesome paper model kits, but they still look like a paper model kit. Very few of the paper model companies use acid free paper and they start to yellow after a couple of years. I know because I built a Wilhelmshaven Gneisenau and USGC Eagle and, after 4 or 5 years of careful dusting and maintenance in a well humidified room, it still yellowed beyond repair. The same thing happened to my HO Scale Robie House, and that was a coated paper. There's no real surface detail on a paper kit. Planking and rivets are just drawn or printed on the paper.
I have great respect and admiration for paper models and their builder's abilities, but they are no replacement for a plastic or resin kit.
RLM
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Will it be that much? How big is a 1/350 Liberty ship? I figured not much more than a foot.
-John
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......and that's why I no longer fool around with paper models anymore.
"The world would be a much simpler place if every one could pick and choose their obligations, but we can't and we shouldn't." Major Charles W. Whittlesey
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Well someone must always be the last person aboard the train ....... /V

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I think I said that you must see the current crop of high tech paper models to appreciate the strides made in just the last few years.
Then you come along and debate this point by making a comparison to an old Wilhemshavener kit. Am I missing something here?
1) The old Communist era paper kits were printed on acid paper. They frayed, yellowed and were miserable kits.
Model printing in Poland today is completely state of the art. Acid free, in register, brilliant colors, easy cutting and folding. The Germans used to own the quality race in printing. Not any longer.
2) Art work advances. You have missed the point again. Yes cardstock models are not as three dimensional as plastic models. But the art work makes up for this fact. Good artwork fools the eye to make the model look more three dimensional then it really is. And this is what makes the paper models so much fun. You are getting something for nothing, and we all like bargains like this. At least, I certainly do.
3) Plastic models are almost too good these days. Too detailed, too realistic. All the models on ARC look the same, perfect. So where is creativity? Where is satisfaction in making something unique out of basic materials? Don't get me wrong. I am not advocating a return to "model from a block of balsa wood." I too want a fair chance at completing a model. Paper gives me that good compromise between scratch building and a mass produced kit.
I will say again. Spend $20 - $30, buy the USS Gambier Bay or USS Jeremiah O'Brien and learn that it is a whole new ball game here. That is the point you missed entirely. It is a new era coming at us at full throttle in cardstock models.
..../Vess
P.S. JSC just released a new Gneisenau in 1/400th. JSC models have improved dramatically since just the millennia. I haven't seen this model, but I suspect it is very nice.

$100
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