(oil) plastic substitute

Hello, I'm assuming this won't be off-topic (seeing how often we
sidetrack into political subjects...)!
I'm a younger member of this hobby; but some of you who've been in it a
while remember when oil was around $10/barrel and plastic kits were
commensurately cheaper. It all ended of course with the oil crises. Now
that oil's expensive again and some scientists say we risk running out
of black gold *for real* in just decades, what substitutes will we have
for plastic? All talk about oil substitutes is centered around
alternative energy but not so much thought about oil-derived materials.
I hope we won't have to learn how to work with whitemetal/wood/beeswax
in 30 years...
Seb
(to reply directly by email change domain suffix from .com to .fr)
Reply to
Seb
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The cost of the plastic in the kit is relatively small compared to the other costs involved in the finished product setting on the hobby shop shelves. For example design, tooling, utilities, packaging, shipping and that "minor" problem of multiple markups by producer, distributor, retailer. Have you priced balsa or basswood lately?
Rick Clark
Reply to
OXMORON1
As noted, the actual petroleum content of the styrene is small, and in fact there are other sources that can be used to get to the same point, such as coal, if not necessarily as conveniently. The real problem (and this will apply to resin or any other synthetic material) are the energy costs attendant to producing the material, transporting it, packaging it, and so on. This will be compounded by greater amounts of everyone's disposable income going to personal energy costs, thus potentially cutting the availablitiy of leisure-time dollars. Paradoxically, this might serve us well, since dinner and a movie (one evening) will end up looking like a pretty poor value compared with thirty-some-odd hours of enjoyment flowing from spending the same money on a kit and related materials. 'Course, the wife might not agree...
Consider this--if you have two thousand kits already, the petroleum in them is not going to cost you another penny. The obvious solution is to buy now, buy lots, and call yourself...a collector.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
Yes I must have forgotten; never used balsa but I'm aware how much it costs. But a related topic: from a certain book (by Dennis Doty I think--maybe you're out there?) I learned that after the first oil crisis kit manufacturers added a milky-colored 'extender' to plastic, which didn't affect its qualities much unless you paint with cellulose. If you use anything more caustic than standard hobby paints on extended plastic, it can craze much worse. Does that mean by now all the plastic we use is extended? Anyone got recollections?
Seb
Reply to
Seb
Don't worry. As I see it, we won't suddenly run out of oil just like that. It will only become more and more expensive until one day it is too expensive to be used as fuel, but still relatively affordable enough to be used for other things. And with less demand the oil reserves would probably last much longer than a couple of decades.
Reply to
John Magne Stubsveen
Come on Tom! In thirty years you'll be trying to remember where the stash is :-)
Rick MFE I didn't know that I had bought one of those!
Reply to
OXMORON1
Mark commented:
Was it Orson Bean who told the old joke about the "Rip Van Winkle" type who was awakened from a long sleep, tried to call and check on his stocks and was told by the operator "Deposit $10,000 for three minutes, Pleeeeze"?
Rick
Reply to
OXMORON1
in article ck3bi4$cn4$ snipped-for-privacy@apollon.grec.isp.9tel.net, Seb at snipped-for-privacy@neuf.com wrote on 10/7/04 7:09 AM:
How about some good 'ol Regianno Parmagianno. Good consistency, can be carved, scraped, sanded, or grated into various shapes, and lasts a long time. And the trimmings can be used too!
mb
Reply to
Milton Bell
Milton questioned:
Next you are going to tell us that we can stretch the noodles for rigging? The meatballs for national markings? How about carved popcycle sticks? George Lee used to do that........
Rick
Reply to
OXMORON1
Well, ESM 72's check list feature allows me to know what I have, but finding it is definately a worry.
All (well, almost all) of my kits are boxed by kit manufacturer on shelves in the garage above the MAI Library. Unfortunately there is so much other stuff in the garage (there's a moped in there somewhere) that it's all hard to get to.
Once the house painting and repairs are completed the garage is next. We need a new garage door, but they have to get twelve feet back to install it. Not possible at this time.
Build. Must build. More and more and more.
Tom
Reply to
Maiesm72
Holy Cow Man! Do you realize how many kits that is? I mean the cost of the door not the 12 feet. Twelve feet of garage floor space x 7 or 8 feet high is big bucks when full of good kits.
Rick VW parts into the garden shed, kits to the garage leaving just enough room to pull down the folding ladder to get to the Halloween decorations, raindeer cutouts, etc in the attic.
Reply to
OXMORON1
There was an Italian Market festival downtown here in June, and one of the exhibits was the cheese wheel carving. I hung around there for a while... :-q
Sister Mary
Reply to
mjrudy
Resin is all petroleum products.
Eyeball2002308 wrote: > > Resin doesn't have any petroleum products in it,does it? > Of course with the styrene competition gone...they'd raise their prices...
Reply to
Ron
Nope.....lots of the over $100 resin ships are made right here by good ole rednecks and yankees, I oughta know, I do research for two of them.
Eyeball2002308 wrote:
Reply to
Ron
Precisely why I'm resistant to this move to put so many consumer goods in plastic packaging. Tinplate can be recycled indefintely, plastic only so many times before it's useless. Makes me wonder how the soybean business is going. Henry Ford I was experimenting with car parts made from soybean extracts. The picture I've seen showed a very dent resistant trunk lid.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller

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