Plastic model magazines

Was doing some reminiscing lately about olden days. Model mags back
then primarily covered flying models (stick and tissue type). An
occasional shelf display (solid) model.
What were the first mags that covered plastic models?
Reply to
Don Stauffer
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Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
First, the blank post that preceded this one was sent by mistake. I clicked twice instead of once, apparently.
Second, the earliest magazine devoted to plastic models that I can remember was Airfix Magazine starting in June 1960. There were plastic modelling columns in other magazines such as RAF Flying Review and Air Pictorial but I don't know of any other magazines completely concerned with plastic models.
I don't know if there was anything on the American market. Can anyone comment?
Gordon McLaughlin
Reply to
Gordon McLaughlin
"Scale Modeler" was one of the first US magazines appearing around 1967(?). There was also a magazine which appeared around 1969 with the awkward title of "1001 New Model Airplane Ideas" which I thought was pretty good.
Martin
Reply to
The Collector
Remember buying the first issue of Scale Modeler as a college freshman. Had the P-51 "Millie P" (or G) on the cover. Probably still have it buried around here somewhere.
Reply to
M Stanley
An issue of "1001 New Model Airplane Ideas" was my first model mag in about '71. I still have that issue. A neat bookstore opened here in '74 & carried all the Challenge aviation & model mags, so I started getting most of them every month. A lot of times I'd show up when they got a shipment of books &/or mags in & I'd help them stock the shelves & they'd pay me in mags & sometimes books. Real nice folks. I still remember the smell of the place. All that paper & natural, unfinished wood siding inside.
Reply to
frank
The first one that I recall here in the States was Scale Modeler. We thought it was pretty good stuff when it came out. The quality of the paper wasn't that good either but it was the only game in town at the time.
It didn't take long before it was known as STALE MODELER because they re-ran the same articles and their quality control was awful. I recall one article on a P-40 where the builder had put the US insignia (stars and bars) on UPSIDE DOWN (The single point of the star was facing down.) and it was a serious article.
Eventually, FineScale Modeler came along and blew away the competition. Worthwhile subjects, good quality paper and photos and, apparently, people who knew what they were talking about.
Reply to
robbelothe
I seem to remember a vignette, where the vehicle was a 1/48th (Bandai?) German 222 armored car...surrounded by a gang of 1/35th (Tamiya) Germans!!!!!.
Ahhhh....those superhuman, virule, ultra-conditioned Aryans....
:o)
Reply to
Greg Heilers
I could never figure out why they had such a hard time finding good content. It's not as though building models was or is an obscure hobby and finding quality craftsmen and info wouldn't be hard to find.
B.H.
Reply to
Brian Hill
The first Scale Modeler was December, 1965.
Another early magazine about the same time, maybe a little later, was HisAirDec News. They had a free decal in every issue. Remember Official Paints?
There was a simlar magazine to 1001 New Model Arplane Ideas. Something like Air & Space Models. Anybody remember for sure? I can't get to that part of the library right now.
Then there were the local model magaznes. Most of them were inspired by IPMS publications. Modeler's Journal, Model-Aire International (wonder whatever happened to that guy?), Replica in Scale.
Some of those oldies were really informative and useful. Then there was Scale Modeler. They not only repeated the same articles, they out-and-out stole articles from other publications and just dared the authors/editors to sue them. Real nice people! They also did Scale Aircraft Modeler for a few years. Lots of reprints from their Air Classics and Scale Modeler.
We are so lucky today to have the many titles, at least from the UK and France. Fine Scale Modeler has the market pretty much to themselves in the US.
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
As to Scale Modeler I have three words: ne plus ultra. Every kit reviewed got that accolade. Around 1971 "Air Enthusiast" arrived on the newsstand here and my purchases of Scale Modeler ceased.
Bill Banaszak, MFE sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
Oh yeah, I remember Air and Space Modeler. I think it lasted 2 years but I may be exaggerating that. That may have been where I met a Sgt. in USAFE through one of his ads for old kits. :)
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
old kits.:-)
Do remember his name?
Dave Boksanski (Bo for short) was an USAF Sgt., but he was in recruiting about that time. One of the finest modelers ever and a real character as well as a good friend. Our IPMS chapter were graced with Bo, George Lee and several other who went on to become quite well known in the modeling world.
Northern California IPMS chapters contributed a great deal to the hobby, far beyond what the size of the club would be expected to produce. Authentical decals, Stein decals, Model-Aire International, ESM 72, Modeler's Journal, Obscuroco conversions and several others.
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
There was another one from that time period, "Fantasy Modeler". Hit the stands in the mid- to later 1970s and lasted about a year. During that time, they did a lot of articles on dioramas, figure painting and space models. Paper was (seemed to be) newsprint, b/w photos seemed muddy but the color photos were gorgeous and the articles well-written.
Reply to
The Old Man
"1001" had its share of typos & misinformation too.
Reply to
frank
"C.R. Krieger" wrote in message Hello? Anybody here *not* an 'airhead'? There were well-established car modeling mags (covering slot racing & plastic kits about equally) by 1968. I'll try to remember to check volume numbers on those I have from '69-'70. -- C.R. Krieger (RMS' only remaining Car Guy©?)
Model Car Science, late 60s Car Modeler also late 60s Rod and Custom Magazine ran about three/four pages for modeling/slots back in the 60s. Peterson Publishing put out a couple hard bound books in the 60s too. And no, you're not the only remaining car guy, builder of rods and customs myself. Mike G.
Reply to
Mike G.
I dabble in cars, too. The number of 1/72 scale car models and kits grows daily.
While I collect 1/72 diecasts I'm always looking for car kits in that scale. The latest find is the new series of Soviet staff cars from AER SRL Moldova. There are four in the series, cast resin, nicely done.
The 1/72 decast line from Hongwell is extensive and the quality is superb. Their line has featured mostly recent and current cars and vans. The recently added classic VW bugs and vans and are doing 1950s pickup trucks. Classic sports cars are also in the line. Detail is amazing, with hood logos, nice rear view mirrors and the like. Interiors are solid colors, but look wonderful if painted.
My one car wish would be a range of 1940 Fords. Long chassis, short chassis, bodies for coupe, sedan (read staff car), pickup, woody, convertible, etc. Injection molded 1/72 scale, please.
Tom Mike G. wrote:
Reply to
maiesm72
I dabble in cars, too. The number of 1/72 scale car models and kits grows daily.
While I collect 1/72 diecasts I'm always looking for car kits in that scale. The latest find is the new series of Soviet staff cars from AER SRL Moldova. There are four in the series, cast resin, nicely done.
The 1/72 decast line from Hongwell is extensive and the quality is superb. Their line has featured mostly recent and current cars and vans. The recently added classic VW bugs and vans and are doing 1950s pickup trucks. Classic sports cars are also in the line. Detail is amazing, with hood logos, nice rear view mirrors and the like. Interiors are solid colors, but look wonderful if painted.
My one car wish would be a range of 1940 Fords. Long chassis, short chassis, bodies for coupe, sedan (read staff car), pickup, woody, convertible, etc. Injection molded 1/72 scale, please.
Tom
I'll keep you in mind when scrounging around. Mike
Reply to
Mike G.
old kits.:-)
Uh, yeah. It was Super Al. Apparently I was less transparent than I was shooting for.
I well remember Bo's early articles for FSM. He was obviously a very talented person.
And some say nothing good comes out of California. ;)
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller
I do remember buying a car mag that had Don Emmon's '63 Mercury conversion article in it. He made a Parnelli Jones' Pikes' Peak Hill Climber out of the stock kit. I was very impressed that an adult 'played around' with model cars. That made two I knew of.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad Modeller

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