Re: cameras - old thread anew

I have worked with three different Canon Powershot "A" series at work and
found them a little better than the HP series for my needs. The HP are a
little bigger than the Canons, and the Canon cameraes have a bette Macro
function. The HP's are maybe a little easier allround but in my opinion also
just a tad lees the quality of the Canon.
If money isn't the matter the Canon EOS 300D is probably also a good choice,
but at minimum the tripple prize (At least here).
Reply to
Claus Gustafsen
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If you go that route then you'll wind up having to memorize a bunch of different functions for each button. I've worked with Canons, Minoltas, etc. The cheaper models have fewer functions and hence fewer buttons. For something really simple, get a Sony Mavica. It loads to a 3.5 floppy which you can insert into any computer that has one. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
I got my wife a Kodak DX6490 for a European trip and once she set it down I grabbed it and haven't touched my 35mm SLR since. I'm not sure of the button count but once I told my wife that it was "her technology" to learn and reminded her that I would not be in Italy with her to show her how to run it, she learned it quite easily.
KL
Reply to
Kurt Laughlin
Hi Keeper:
My Immediate thought is yes, I have a Mavica. That said, are they still in production?? Like I pointed out, I bought mine 3 years ago.
Bill Shuey
Reply to
William H. Shuey
IMOH, 3.5 floppies are on the way out. When we bought our new desktop back in the summer of 2003, the salesperson acted like we were ordering a rotary dial-up. She did a lot of boohooing about special order, etc. Kim M
Reply to
Royabulgaf
Hey, I have a rotary dial phone here! But I know what you mean. When I was car shopping 10 years ago I told salesmen I was looking for something without power steering. They always got that 'look'.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
It's a shame, too....as floppies are so easy, quick, convenient, and cheap; when it comes to small files. But, the drives are also cheap as well; so even if you *do* buy a box without one....if it has an empty bay, you can put in a floppy drive for under $10.00.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Ive got a Canaon PowerShot (4 MegaPixels, 3*Optical + 7*Digital) and I have not used an easier point and click in my life. My wife who readily admits being a technophobe uses it all the time, and can download from camera to computer to relatives via email easy as. I think only the Kodak EasyShare could be simpler. Me, I use all the manual functions I can find on that puppy and the only thing I use my old Pentax MZ10 for is the 300mm lens + 2x teleconverter. One day soon the Canon digital SLR is on the list . . . ALL digitals have two options - point and click (one button) and "hey, gimme a go at the wheel" (nearly fully manual). Its up to you how you use it. TSR2
Reply to
TSR2
snipped-for-privacy@stuffspam.ping.off (TSR2) wrote in :
(re: manual settings) Some more than others, of course. Manual aperture/shutter speed settings are only available on the more expensive cameras, usable manual focussing is pretty much limited to digital SLRs.
Reply to
Harro de Jong
snip
Yes, I can't understand why they're in such a big hurry to dump the floppy. If you're buying a new box you'll need to transition your floppies into the new unit, yes? It's really annoying when they look at you like you asked them for an 8-track player. I'm having trouble finding cassette tapes at this point. I find CD's entirely too easily corrupted.
Proud owner of an 8 track recorder
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
Given that the average HD now runs over 80gigs and a floppy only holds 1.44 megs it's no wonder the floppy is on it's way out. I currently have 3400 research photos on my HD, for the smallest image file it would take 5 floppies to hold it.
Reply to
Ron
Part of the problem is that both floppy disk drives and the disks themselves are now extremely low cost commodity items and the reliability is falling fast as far as I can see. The old days of good quality disks is gone.
David
Reply to
David Pennington
a mere ten years ago my best friend and i would go to trade shows just to get high quality floppies. companies gave out software samples and we would hit each 3-4 times to get a shopping bagfull. fast fromat and relabel and we had a good supply. when i left the east, i threw about 5000 away because no one wanted them.
Reply to
e
Got a cube-mate in the same straights...first it was the 5.25" floppy, then it was the 3.25" floppy, then it was DAT tape, then it was the Zip, then the CD/DVD...now it's the USB thumb-drive. I held out for a bit, but I have both 256 and 512 Meg thumb-drives now, and I'd seriously like to have a 1 Gig one. These days you gotta spend your cash and cover all the bases.
...though I do own a couple of USB "super-floppy" drives - one will write/read 240 Meg 3.25" disks...if you can find the media.
Reply to
Rufus
Got one too. Cartridges run around 25¢ at yard sales. I've never tried to record something, just play and record onto cassettes.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
I had a 5" floppy installed on my last machine (about '99) just to ensure I'd be able to transfer data. Used it a couple of times.
The 3.5 is another story. Plenty of data there to transfer. Of course it's just as easy to send it over the 'net but you gotta leave your options open! Cheers,
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
My dad got me a Sony something-or-other 2 years ago for Xmas. Went thru 3 returns & never got one that worked right. Got a refund & waited. About a year ago, I found a Kodak DX6440 on eBay & did some research. Bought one of them & not a minute's trouble since. I'm like your friend's husband: I hate buttons. I think there are things this 6440 will do that I haven't tried yet, but it's a piece of cake. It also comes with a camera dock that stays hooked to the PC, & makes downloading pics a piece of cake too. I'm very pleased with my DX6440. About $400 last year.
Reply to
frank may

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