Slightly OT-Scales

Is there a standard length and width for a particular scale size?
Such as a 1/8 scales is X length and X wide? (in relation to die casts)
Any help would be appreciated or a web page that will give the info
Thank You
Reply to
MikeXP
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Correction: 1:18 die cast 1/18
Sorry about that
Reply to
MikeXP
Scale is relative to the original size of the actual object- I have a 1/18 diecast Citroen 2CV on the shelf next to the same scale Auburn Boattail Roadster. Guess which model is bigger?
Scale only means the larger the denominator of the fraction describing the scale, the smaller the model is. A 1/144 model is half the size of a 1/72 model of the same object. Sorry about using big words like denominator, but I am a math teacher ;)
Reply to
Jim Atkins
Scale should be the same in ALL directions.
MikeXP wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer
På Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:13:56 GMT, skrev MikeXP :
The length of a 1/18 scale model is 1/18 of the length of the original.
Reply to
BÃ¥rd Henriksen
Not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll use the shotgun approach and see if we can hit it.
Particular scale size of what exactly? Depends on what you're scaling. If it's a male figure that's easy enough. Std male height is around 6 feet or 72". Dividing that by the scale factor (18 in this case) yields 4". Under those conditions, results being 1/18th model people, 4" is the standard scale length. Aside from several lines of police and spec ops action figures in 3 3/4" - 4" length, I'm not aware of too much product that will serve a 1/18th need. 100mm is a close approximate, so any figure you see listed at that size will work. Because we're talking about human figures (which vary in height) there is of course a fudge factor available.
WmB
To reply, get the HECK out of there snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Reply to
WmB
So true. This rule is normally only relaxed as a rule in the world of Dr. Seuss. ;-)
WmB
To reply, get the HECK out of there snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Reply to
WmB
Actually, many three dimensional maps have different scales for vertical and horizontal dimensions. This serves to accentuate the vertical features and make details visible that would otherwise be lost.
Jack
Reply to
Jack G
Since there is such a range of sizes among the original subjects, any particular "envelope" won't fit everything. Like in die cast cars, while the majority of sedans would fit a common size box, a little sports car or big SUV in the same scale would not. For a time, many model airplanes came in "box scale" regardless of the proportional size of the original, they all were made to fit a common box. Car model makers have usually kept to hard and fast scales to maintain proper proportion.
Reply to
steve gallacci
Jim, does that imply that you possess instruments of maths instruction?..
sorry.. with all the Hussein stuff going around, I couldn't resist..
I'm also a teacher and have a bit too much time on my hands today.. gotta go build something.. Mike please remove "diespam" to reply
If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, perhaps you've misunderstood the situation.
Reply to
MLDHOC
My being a retired geologist, your comment immediately came to mind for me. Vertical exaggeration......................
Good day, Francis Marion
Reply to
Francis Marion
Are you saying that that he's a member of Al-Gebra???
-- John ___ __[xxx]__ (o - ) --------o00o--(_)--o00o-------
The history of things that didn't happen has never been written - Henry Kissinger
Reply to
The Old Timer
all of you with the Al-Gebra line- hand write 100 times "I will not retransmit without the express written permission of Major League Baseball".
Reply to
Jim Atkins
I will admit...this exchange was quite witty!
Congrats!!!
:o)
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Go to your room, John...... ;-p
Reply to
Al Superczynski
I'm sorry, it just spilled out. I'm try to NEVER let it happen again. (until the next time!)
-- John ___ __[xxx]__ (o - ) --------o00o--(_)--o00o-------
The history of things that didn't happen has never been written - Henry Kissinger
Reply to
The Old Timer
that the organization headed by hasan bin sober?
Reply to
e
Thank You dor all of your responses
Reply to
MikeXP
Mike,
The "scale" of any model is the size of that particular subject, expressed as a particular fraction of the size of the real subject. For example: 1:18 scale tells us that if one puts 18 of any one model end-to-end (or with a car, which I think you are referring to) with the bumpers touching, the total length of the row of 18 models, all alike, touching each other, should equal the length of one real car of the same kind.
I suspect that perhaps you might be discovering that not all 1:18 scale diecasts are in truth 1:18 scale! This is especially true with the lower-priced "1:18" scale diecasts, such as one finds in the large discount department stores (Walmart, etc). Why? Well in the mass-merchandising stores such as Walmart, Target etc., shelf space is everything, and I mean everything! The larger the item, the fewer of them can be put in the same space on the shelves. This can make it necessary to compromise to a smaller scale when the car being replicated would be too large for the allotted shelf space were it to be truly 1:18 scale. Or, the manufacturer may simply not pay close attention to the overall scale, even the proportions of the model.
As an example, about a year ago, I put calipers and calculator to Sunstar's 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk, which is a $25-range diecast, advertised all over the packaging as being "1:18 Scale". I then compared these measurements with my reference photographs of a real (1:1 scale) 1957 Studebaker Golden Hawk, which car resides in the Studebaker National Museum in South Bend, Indiana. I was given full, unfettered access to this car, so was able not only to photograph it from all angles, but also to measure the critical dimensions of the car. My findings?
Sunstar's 1:18 scale Golden Hawk is about 1:19 scale in overall length, right at 1:17 scale in width, the "greenhouse" (the roof, from the bottom of the windshield to the bottom of the rear window is also 1:17 scale, and the height of the roof, from beltline (the bottom line of the side windows) to the top is an astounding 1:16 scale!
Some larger so-called 1:18 scale cars (particularly at the lower price ranges!) are even more inaccurately presented. I've seen 1959 Cadillac Eldorados and even 1959 Chevrolet Impalas presented to the consumer as 1:18 scale, which in their width, they are, but when one puts the calipers to the model, then compares the measurements of the models to the well-known and widely published dimensions of the real car, they turn out to be 1:18 scale in width and height, but as small as 1:20 in length. This, I assume, is either due to a lack of real information about the real, prototype car, or a perceived need to "scrunch down" the model for a particular size box.
Now, if all model cars are truly to the same scale, you would see the same variations in size (length, width and height) in them that you would see in real life. All cars are not the same size, as you no doubt know, so if the models you see and buy are truly done in the same scale, then they will also be differently sized, just like the real ones.
Art Anderson
Reply to
EmilA1944
I've noticed a random scaling of some toy soldier type sets. The figures are, I assume 1/32 or so, so any vehicles included are 1/32 as well. Like some helo that looks nothing like a real one (maybe it's a Sikorsky!) or an F-16 that's about 5 inches long & a bunch of 1/48 size tanks. But it's called 1/32 all over. I've seen some 1/72 airport sets. Looks like most of the vehicles are 1/100-1/72, the figures are about 1/48 & the airliners would be around 1/600-1/400, street barricades & signage between 1/32 & 1/48 maybe, but it's labeled as 1/72 scale.
Reply to
famvburg

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