Something Softer Than Putty

The last time I used putty,it didnt want co-operate,it rolled off like
it was next to dryng out,maybe I had an old tube.
Reply to
teem
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Reply to
thegoodtool
Tools using in making models This is Alexander zhang from Shenzhen shenchuang industrial company, a specialized tools manufacturer. Our product 6 in 1 is specially designed for making models. they are really novel products. It can make of mini jigsaw, metal lathe, wood lathe, grinder, miller, driller. You can make whatever models by using our products. Contact: snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com
Reply to
thegoodtool
I also had a similar problem with putty. I could never get it to work properly.
My solution is to thin the putty down.
Take a bit and put it on some paper and then with a small brush I mix in a little acetone until it softens. I then use this softened putty. I find it adheres well and is easy to get into small places.
Instead of acetone, you can also use the Tamiya ultra thin glue with it's "bottle brush". This, however, means that the glue becomes contaminated so you have to have a dedicated "putty thinning bottle of thin glue". The brush, however, is almost purpose made because it is small, thin and stiff.
Both systems work for me, and there's no real delay in setting time or strength either.
Hope it helps.
Reply to
Andrea
Like Andrea said, thin it. I use Testor's liquid (clear glass bottle) cement. Just a coulpe drops should do. You can thin it down to paint viscosity and brush it on. I found that very helpfull when filling seams on 1/35 and smaller figures. HTH
Reply to
chuck ryan
I find most putties are like that. I frequently discard the putty right at the mouth of the tube, and make sure to get really fresh stuff on the tool. It DOES dry fast (but that is good 'cause you don't have to wait too long to sand it). So make sure you keep appying fresh stuff and don't let any sit on your application tool- wipe it clean each time you dip into the tube.
Also, each time I open the tube, I carve out all the stuff near the mouth and discard that as well.
Reply to
Don Stauffer in Minnesota
that's enough, jerkoff. now i wouldn't buy from you for any reason. not blind or stupid. go spam walmart's.
Reply to
someone
(Better) Alternatives to putty:
gap-filling super glue (can be wet sanded and polished to a high gloss)
"white out" (typewriter correction fluid) (can be wet sanded)
white glue (Elmers) (can't be sanded! will melt if gets wet!)
BONDO! (two part epoxy paste-- used for real cars)
two part epoxy "clay"
two part epoxy "wood filler"
(I like epoxy!)
Reply to
dancho
on 12/8/2007 9:56 PM teem said the following:
Water isn't going to do anything for putty. If anything, lacquer might, but why take a chance? Buy a new tube..
Reply to
willshak
This is a wild guess,but everytime I see a box of tubes of putty,I get a feeling they've been laying around for years,have to squeeze 'em sometimes.
Reply to
teem
Do them little glass "microballoons" still exist? Way in the dawn of time, used to stuff them into the gap and dose with superglue to hold them. Gave a spongier fill, easier to sand than solid superglue.
Also used to do the same thing with baking soda. Baking soda is a superglue accelerator, so when you applied the glue to the stuffed up gap, it would smoke. If you got any of the baking soda onto the tip of the end of the tube, that was pretty much it for the tubeful.
Reply to
z

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