Squadron v. Tamiya Putty

I think I used the last of my Squadron putty. Never gave a smooth
surface. the Tamiya putty goes on smooth and does not need much work
except for filing/sanding.
I'm gonna quit Squadron unless someone has a tip to get the stuff to
go on smoother and dry with a better finish..
Craig
Reply to
Musicman59
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Which Squadron? I had lousy luck with green, but in my experience squadron white is almost as good as tamiya. The main thing to me is just that tamiya putty is so much pricier and harder to find in my area.
Reply to
eyeball
same as eyeball, the "green stuff" was a pain. IIRC, the last time I used it it reacted with the plastic, which softened and never seemed to set back up. don't know if was the plastic itself or too much solvent in the putty.
Reply to
OldSchool
I've never been able to get Squadron white to stick - it feathers nice enough, but it gets brittle, chips and flakes...I think I tried one tube of it - used a small amount on a couple models and threw the rest in the trash.
I'd still be using red Dr. Microtools if I could still get it...Tamiya putty is my one and only now.
Reply to
Rufus
I never had a problem with squadron white sticking, but like "Old school" the green melted a few parts, but that was over 20 years ago. Sometimes I also use model master red, which is similar to the stuff you get at auto parts stores. And has anyone ever gotten those little gray testors tubes to work? They come out hard, crumbling, and wouldn't stick if I put it on under duct tape...
Reply to
eyeball
that red colored auto finisher stuff works well for me. you can make really thin laters for minimal sanding. or you can make thick layers to fill the chasms. i forget what it's called.
Reply to
someone
The Testors Model Master red is really similar to Dr. Microtools, but the first tube I got was separated in the tube, and I couldn't get it to mix up enough so I could actually use it...just oily green/red goo out of the tube. So I abandoned it, but I should try it again sometime.
Ditto your experience on the gray tube - I quit that stuff when I was still a teen...
Reply to
Rufus
remixing in a discarded pill bottle works. put a layer of plastic wrap around the lid to seal air tight. just stir the f...crap out of it.
Reply to
someone
, eyeball wrote:
Here:
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is basically the same stuff as Dr. Microtools.
Peteski
Reply to
Peter W.
I use automotive spot putty. At least that is what us oldtimers call it. It is now called glazing putty. It does shrink a bit, but that merely means several coats. It is cheap in terms of pounds per dollar, though you have to buy it in pretty large tubes these days 'cause not many folks do their own body repairs, so the tubes are meant for shops. You have to be careful about putting cap back on promptly, as you don't want a fifteen dollar tube to dry out (had that happen once).
I usually use it over primer, but it will work okay on bare plastic.
Reply to
Don Stauffer
that's the stuff. thanks pete.
Reply to
someone
I have found tamiya putty, i can't remember which (fine/coarse/etc but I can look when I get home tonight) to harden with a smooth/glossy/shiney finish compared to squadron white and bondo (the red car stuff). But, they all have their uses for me.
Reply to
John McGrail
John McGrail wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@spearmint.skaterat.net:
Squadron Green ruined a model for me. I used it to fix weight in place and it melted the plasric. I use Tamiya now, I've actully dumped some in a bottle with Testors liquid glue to thin it out. Works pretty good.
Reply to
Gray Ghost
snipped-for-privacy@spearmint.skaterat.net:
I did something similar once, back when I was a wee lad. I had an A-20 (I forget by whom) with the clear nose, and wanted to do a solid nose version. I had the bright idea of filling the nose with squadron green. All at once. The next day I had a rubbery nose and a ruined model...
Reply to
eyeball
you had a mudel.
Reply to
someone
tfo=3D
At least my spare parts box grew fast in those days.
Reply to
eyeball
I also use tamiya putty, and thin it with liquid styrene cement when needed. Another option for you all: Mr. Surfacer, in various grits. You can brush it on, and thin it with oil paint. Sands nice too.
Steve B. Dominican Republic
Reply to
stevebrauning
Has anyone found a tube putty that betters Milliput ?...for those times when sheer convenience of a quick cap removal and squirt are required for speed. For those in the UK, and the company may sell it abroad, there is, if you dont mind mixing equal portions of each stick together, as opposed to the convenience of undoing a cap and squirting filler out, a truly excellent filler putty called Milliput. UK modellers have been aware of this for many years. You wont get better regards sanding down to super feather edge, it wont flake, or shrink, or melt styrene, can be smoothed into place with water and that ability makes it truly ace to work with, sets under water, setting time can be accelerated with heat (not too hot so that it melts the kit ! )...and its available in super fine white, or standard yellow grey or terracotta for pots etc. Can be sanded, drilled , tapped, milled , sawn, scribed etc. Worked like a putty, have surface scribed and patterned when setting, rolled into sheets, or formed into sculptures, sets rock solid whether its a minute piece or a massive lump. Just mix it thoroughly, I press the two coloured lumps together, fold in half, press, fold in half, press etc, many times. Working time for the standard is about 45 mins, for the white, 20 mins and its too stiff to then work with. Use superfine for extreme fine grain and speed of set. Overnight cure and its like rock, shatters like a stone if hit with hammer, so that should tell you its strength, sure aint crumbly stuff. Odourless. Sticks to degreased styrene like superglue, sticks to the metal spatula well also, so clean up quick. especially fingers, wear latex gloves to avoid dealing with puttied fingers ! Roll it into fine sausage shape for laying into fisures. Press mold it into shapes. Roll it into very small balls for knobs etc. Form panel lines in it before its fully set or scribe it afterwards. Manipulate like modelling clay after mixed. Standard grey or superfine white packets say rock hard in 3 hrs room temperature.
Leading UK model shops stock it.
The Milliput Co, Unit 8, The Marian, Dolgellau, Mid Wales LL40 1UU tel 01341 422562
Loads of domestic uses, Google it !
Steve
Reply to
Steve

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