This is the bit that I like the best

I'm currently building a Luftwaffe RF-4E and a USAF F-15A, both in 1/72 and
both from the Hasegawa kits. The F-15A is in overall Air Superiority Blue.
I once wondered whether that would be a suitable subject for a "model in a
weekend". Now I have to say, no way! There are so many parts to the
airframe, with a number of problematic joints, that its simply not possible
to finish that model in a weekend.
Anyway, I have completed the paint jobs on both models. Over the next couple
of days I will be spraying a number of coats of Klear (aka Future). It's
important that I get a very high gloss finish on the RF-4E as I shall be
covering most of the surface with decals. I'm using the AirDoc stencil
sheet. Rather than having hundreds and hundreds of individual stencils, this
sheet has large areas containing a number of stencils. It will be easier and
a lot less tedious to apply them all, but the chance of trapping air under
such large expanses of clear decal is so much greater, hence the need for a
gloss finish. However, the decals look good on the sheet. I just wish that
AirDoc would produce a stencil set for US Phantoms in this manner.
I should be ready to apply decals by the weekend. That's the part that I
really like. I find that it's only when you first start applying decals that
the model really comes to life. Even an hours work can completely transform
the model. That's when the sense of achievement really starts, especially if
the model has been a bit of a beast up until then.
So, what is *your* favourite bit?
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
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Painting, without a doubt. I like to do the weathering as part of the paintjob, so it can get to be quite creative at times. It's quite satisfying to see a large expanse of solid monotone colour "come to life", as it were. Decalling, I have to say, I find can turn into a chore as a mainly modern jet man. The only one I haven't had to do in several shifts recently has been the Operation Granby Jaguar I finished a few weeks ago. Only 11 decals on the whole thing, not including Sidewinders. Bliss.
Reply to
flak monkey
what some people consider the hardest; rigging a bi-plane. since i learned the sewing on method, i go nuts with a sheet of paper figuring out the most direct, least holey way to do it. i also like doing those fiddly-ass tracks for armor. the patience i didn't have when younger came hard and i really like using it. masking camo is fun, too.
Reply to
someone
That's freaky. I was dreaming about the underside detail on the F-15 only last night. I have to stop reading this forum! :o)
(kim)
Reply to
kim
I think I like the bit just before you start applying the decals - the model looks so fresh and clean then, and you get that last look at what you're skill with an airbrush has actually accomplished. Close to "life", but in a way that it never will be again once it's completely finished. I'll usually pause and look at it a while - sometimes a few days - before I start decaling.
Reply to
Rufus
Enzo typed out:
Since I predominantly brush paint, I find painting to be very relaxing. It helps if the paint is mixed just right and it goes on smoothly. Depending on the colour and how many other models will end up with it, I may just keep going, well past the intended model or models.
Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Exactly what I do! I was terrible at painting as a kid,and now it's probably the only part I'm good at!
Reply to
eyeball
Scratchbuilding little tiny details.The trench mortars that came with the Hat WWI Russian Heavy Weapons set are terrible. I ended up scratchbuilding one using a couple of photos and a drawing in Osprey books. Eight parts=A0 and it fits on the end of my little finger.Also figuring out something different to make a model "mine". In the above trench vignette it's an empty pair of boots sitting out to dry. In another it's a period poster on a wall with direct relation to the subject. It's harder to do with aircraft, which Is probably why I pick unusual subjects. My latest completed (!) aircraft have been the Roden PKZ-2 helicopter and a what-if twin fuselage version of the "Spirit of St. Louis" called "Spirit of Minneapolis/St.Paul". Fun conversion using two Hawk kits, one fuselage sealed for fuel tanks. Larger windows on the other fuselage and a complete interior. At least there's a lot of room in the empty Hawk fuselage :-) Litttle touches such as tail wheels, fuselage to fuselage fuel lines, landing light, pitot tube and horizontal stabilizers, which were left out of the Hawk kit. A friend even made logos for the noses in the same style=A0 used on the Spirit of St.Louis.In the stack of two dozen started projects the pair of Yak-11s are on top. These are converted to the PW2000 powered Yak that I fly using three blade props from a Hasegawa Tracker. Biggest problem was duplicating the row of exhaust stubs which replaced the original two on the factory-built plane. Ended up heat stretching plastic tubing. "Blyak" is gloss black with bright chrome trim, which shall be my first effort at using Alclad II.Tom > So, what is *your* favourite bit?> > > Since I predominantly brush paint, I find painting to be very relaxing.> > It helps if the paint is mixed just right and it goes on smoothly.> > Depending on the colour and how many other models will end up with it, I> > may just keep going, well past the intended model or models.> > > Bill Banaszak, MFE Sr.> > Exactly what I do! I was terrible at painting as a kid,and now it's> probably the only part I'm good at!
Reply to
maiesm72

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