creating a golf ball

I'm wondering how I could go about modeling a golf ball in SW. Heres what I've done so far:
create a sphere create a dimple in the sphere (using a revcut)
pattern that dimple around the sphere
so now all I have is a sphere with one row of dimples. Even if i were able to create more "rows", thats nothing like the real golf ball i have sitting on my desk.
what gives!? Any ideas, suggestions, and of course tutorial would be great.
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fossill wrote:

There are a couple on Content Central
John Layne www.solidengineering.co.nz
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fossill wrote:

This might be of some help:
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&lP&s1=%2220050009639%22.PGNR.&OS=DN/20050009639&RS=DN/20050009639
Here is a part from the above site:
The Dimple Pattern of the Cover
[0088] Turning now to the dimple technology employed in the instant invention, as was discussed previously, the manipulation of the dimple configuration also yield a golf ball with improved characteristics of play. As stated previously, the preferred geometry is a rhombicosadodecahedron. Accordingly, the scope of this invention provides a golf ball mold whose molding surface contains a uniform pattern to give the golf ball a dimple configuration superior to those of the art. The invention is preferably described in terms of the golf ball that results from the mold, but could be described within the scope of this invention in terms of the mold structure that produces a golf ball.
[0089] To assist in locating the dimples on the golf ball, the golf ball of this invention has its outer spherical surface partitioned by the projection of a plurality of polygonal configurations onto the outer surface. That is, the formation or division that results from a particular arrangement of different polygons on the outer surface of a golf ball is referred to herein as a "plurality of polygonal configurations." A view of one side of a golf ball 5 showing a preferred division of the golf ball's outer surface 7 is illustrated in FIG. 2.
[0090] In the preferred embodiment, a polygonal configuration known as a rhombicosadodecahedron is projected onto the surface of a sphere. A rhombicosadodecahedron is a type of polyhedron which contains thirty (30) squares, twenty (20) polyhedra of one type, and twelve (12) polyhedra of another type. The term "rhombicosadodecahedron" is derived from "dodecahedron," meaning a twelve (12) sided polyhedron; "icosahedron," meaning a twenty (20) sided polyhedron, and "rhombus" meaning a four sided polyhedron.
[0091] The rhombicosadodecahedron of the preferred embodiment is comprised of thirty (30) squares 12, twelve (12) pentagons 10, and twenty (20) triangles 14, as shown in FIG. 2. It has a uniform pattern of pentagons with each pentagon bounded by triangles and squares. The uniform pattern is achieved when each regular pentagon 10 has only regular squares 12 adjacent to its five boundary lines, and when a regular triangle 14 extends from each of the five vertices of the pentagon. Five (5) squares 12 and five (5) triangles 14 form a set of polygons around each pentagon. Two boundary lines of each square are common with two pentagon boundary lines, and each triangle has its vertices common with three pentagon vertices.
[0092] The outer surface of the ball is further defined by a pair of poles and an uninterrupted equatorial great circle path around the surface. A great circle path is defined by the intersection between the spherical surface and a plane that passes through the center of the sphere. (An infinite number of great circle paths may be drawn on any sphere.) The uninterrupted equatorial great circle path in the preferred embodiment corresponds to a mold parting line, which separates the golf ball into two hemispheres. The uninterrupted great circle path is described as uninterrupted because it has no dimples on it. The mold parting line is located from the poles in substantially the same manner as the equator of the earth is located from the north and south poles.
[0093] Referring to FIG. 3, the poles 70 are located at the center of a pentagon 10 on the top and bottom sides of the ball, as illustrated in this view of one such side. The mold parting line 30 is at the outer edge of the circle in this planar view of the golf ball. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the poles 72 are both located at the center of the square on the top and bottom of the golf ball, as illustrated in this view of one such side. (The top and bottom views are identical.) The mold parting line 40 is at the outer edge of the circle in this planar view of the golf ball.
[0094] Dimples are placed on the outer surface of the golf ball based on segments of the plurality of polygonal configurations described above. In the preferred embodiment, three (3) dimples are associated with each triangle, five (5) dimples are associated with each square, and sixteen (16) dimples are associated with each pentagon. The term "associated" as used herein in relation to the dimples and the polyhedra means that the polyhedra are used as a guide for placing the dimples.
[0095] In the preferred embodiment, there are a total of 402 dimples. Advantageously, this decrease in the number of dimples when compared to prior art golf balls results in a geometrical configuration that contributes to the aerodynamic stability of the instant golf ball. Aerodynamic stability is reflected in greater control over the movement of the instant golf ball.
[0096] The dimple configuration of the preferred embodiment is shown in FIGS. 5-8. It is based on the projection of the rhombicosadodecahedron shown in FIG. 3. The ball has a total of 402 dimples. The plurality of dimples on the surface of the ball are selected from three sets of dimples, with each set having different sized dimples. Dimples 200 are in the first set, dimples 202 are in the second set, and dimples 204 are in the third set. Dimples are selected from all three sets to form a first pattern associated with the pentagon 10. All sides 206 of each pentagon are intersected by two dimples 200 from the first set of dimples and one dimple 202 from the second set of dimples. All pentagons 10 have the same general first pattern arrangement of dimples.
[0097] Dimples 200, 202 and 204 (from all three sets of dimples) are also used to form a second pattern associated with the squares 12. All sides 208 of each square 12 are intersected by dimples 202 from the second set of dimples, and all squares have the same general second pattern arrangement of dimples.
[0098] Dimples 202 from the second set of dimples form a third pattern associated with the triangles 14. All sides 210 of each triangle are intersected by a dimple 202 from this second set of dimples. All triangles have this same general third pattern arrangement of dimples. The mold parting line 30 is the only dimple free great circle path on this ball.
[0099] Advantageously, the use of a single uninterrupted mold parting line leads to superior aerodynamic properties in the instant golf ball. The single mold parting line results in less severe separation between the dimples, i.e. less "bald spots" on the surface of the ball. This in turn increases the effectiveness of the dimples on the golf ball. Advantageously, increasing the effectiveness of the dimples by reducing the land area on the surface of the golf ball improves the aerodynamic properties of the instant golf ball with regard to distance and control.
[0100] A single radius (Radius 1) describes the entire shape of the dimple. Dimple size is measured by a diameter and depth generally according to the teachings of U.S. Pat. No. 4,936,587 (the '587 patent), which is included herein by reference thereto. An exception to the teaching of the '587 patent is the measurement of the depth, which is discussed below. A cross-sectional view through a typical dimple 6 is illustrated in FIG. 9. The diameter Dd used herein is defined as the distance from edge E to edge F of the dimple. Edges are constructed in this cross-sectional view of the dimple by having a periphery 50 and a continuation thereof 51 of the dimple 6. The periphery and its continuation are substantially a smooth surface of a sphere. An arc 52 is inset about 0.003 inches below curve 50-51-50 and intersects the dimple at point E' and F'. Tangents 53 and 53' are tangent to the dimple 6 at points E' and F" respectively and intersect periphery continuation 51 at edges E and F respectively. The exception to the teaching of '587 noted above is that the depth d is defined herein to be the distance from the chord 55 between edges E an F of the dimple 6 to the deepest part of the dimple cross sectional surface 6(a), rather than a continuation of the periphery 51 of an outer surface 50 of the golf ball. In the preferred embodiment, dimples 200 from the first set have a diameter of 0.156 inches; dimples 202 from the second set have a diameter of 0.145 inches, and dimples 204 from the third set have a diameter of 0.142 inches. Dimples 200 have a depth of 0.0080 inches. Dimples 202 have a depth of 0.0078 inches. Dimples 204 have a depth of 0.0076 inches. All dimples 200, 202, and 204 are single radius in cross section.
[0101] Advantageously, the use of dimples that are single radius in cross section improves the performance of the instant golf ball with respect to both distance and control of the movement of the golf ball given the high spin rate of the instant high performance three-piece ball. The presence of single radius dimples allows for a soft trajectory in the golf ball's flight on iron shots. In turn, this soft trajectory leads to a soft entry of the golf ball onto the golf course green, which in turn results in greater control over the movement of the instant golf ball. Remarkably, the single radius provides a boring trajectory during driver shots.
[0102] The radius (radius 1) for dimples 200 in the preferred embodiment is about 0.7874 inches, the radius for dimples 202 is about 0.3325 inches, and the radius for dimples 204 is 0.3191 inches. However, it is understood that the following dimple size ranges are within the scope of this invention. Dimples 200 from the first set may have a diameter in the range of 0.154 inches to 0.158 inches; dimples 202 from the second set may have a diameter in the range of 0.142 to 0.147 inches; dimples 204 from the third set may have a diameter in the range of 0.140 to 0.144 inches and the radius may be in the range of 0.3150 to 0.3850 inches.
--
Billy Hiebert
HIEBERT SCULPTURE WORKS
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All I have to say is "Holy Shit - who woulda thunk?" [|:-)>

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and I would add "holy crap"!

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I second that, WOW, it's amazing the know how that goes into a golfball.
Del

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