Large Assys - SW Not Proven at All

Of course you are correct about there being good sales persons. I do have respect for many of the SW support as well as direct. Can't say so much for
past AutoDesk support and service (just thinking about it raises my blood pressure, take a deep breath, count to ten, better). The Cad Guy's statement was vague and could easily of been interpreted as SW has no problem opening a 60,000 piece assembly in its entirety. Then there is assembly drawing performance and that is another topic to its own.
I also use some of these techniques to mentioned to some degree or less. The artistic in me doesn't like modeling a spring to look like a solid cylinder. Or removing the detail from commercial parts to a point they loose their identity. My simplified SHCS look like they could be a headed rivet, headed punch, trailer hitch pin or maybe a tooling button. Too me models and drawings should look like what they are and be easily interpreted by others not so trained in the field of design or engineering. It takes considerable effort and time (non value added) to create configurations to suppress fillets, fasteners, chamfers, holes etc...
Unfortunately a necessity given the software limitations.
In our business, we design custom assembly, weld and metal removal equipment for automotive front and rear axle assemblies and various interior sub-assemblies. These non-native assemblies cause all sorts of performance issues in SW and SolidEdge for that matter. We have suppressed parts, translated into parasolids and still the performance is generally poor. Add to this fixtures, imported commercial components and fabricated parts and you get the picture. I would be interested in learning other ways to improve performance when importing non-native models.
Kman

has
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very
people
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I personnally doubt if you if you could actually work with an entire 60,000 parts assembly at once. I would think that if you tried to open an assembly of a domestic car (for example) fully resolved, you would run out of RAM and the assembly would crash. I work daily with assemblies of about a thousand parts, and I use about 2 GB of RAM. Once I enter into the virtual memery , the computer soon crashes. Today's PC computers are limited to about 3GB of RAM. There's no way I can see you opening 60,000 parts on a PC Desktop using SW.

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I've met with some of the Haumiller people. They have their stuff together. Unfortunately few "normal" SW users/companies are as organized as they are or have the expertise they have. Which leads me to believe that success with the software is at least as much a function of company organization and expertise as it is with the software. I don't think that the average VAR AE or TTM is on the level of people like Haumiller in terms of making practical use of the software. And if they aren't, it is pretty clear that it won't trickle down to the user level.
At SWW I listened to the StructureWorks people talk about how they handled 100,000 part assemblies and the hoops they had to jump through.
One thing is clear, that you have to trade off one feature for another to get SW to handle these monster assemblies and that success with assemblies is very much a function of discipline and planning early on. I think it is also true that certain types of assemblies can cause problems no matter what you do. Assemblies that use parts within parts, aka, configurations are one example. Assemblies that tie parts together with in-context features are another. Use of things like SmartFasteners which can populate an assembly with thousands of fasteners very quickly is yet another.
CAD Guy wrote:

modeling.
locomotives
to mind

Michelin, etc.

website.
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Check out Solid Edge from UGS. The newest release (V17) has some new features specifically geared towards massively large assemblies.
Ken

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Any empirical data to support those big adjectives? You need to coax them into publishing something. If nothing else they can at least add to inventor's trouncing unless all that Functional Design stuff helps 'em (darned sure don't want to overengineer all those cubes). 8~)
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I haven't seen any numbers, but does that really mean anything? They can tell you anything, but untill you try it yourself...
Ken

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"They" as in the numbers, or as in the sales reps?

There has to be some potential for ROI apparent before I'll spend the time. Haven't seen anything yet to indicate there is any. Sooner or later something will pop up. I'm sure there's a lot of this "testing" going on behind all the various curtains. Of course no one's gonna publish anything that indicates the other guy wins and there has to be justification for buying the ad space...
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Em wrote:

In my experience SolidWorks is a huge resource hog.
My performance reference is Pro/E.
SolidWorks slows to a crawl displaying hidden line or wireframe views, even on relatively simple parts. Drawings are slow to manipulate. Assemblies over about 500 parts slow down to a crawl. File sizes are huge.
There are tricks to help but these are basic problems.
I use SW every day and I like it, but it is not the kind of program you would do anything too serious with (no cars, space shuttles, planes, or nuclear submarines, etc.).
Part of this is due to the Windows-PC platform to which SW is married.
I'd suggest looking into a very fast 64-bit UNIX workstation(s) (like a Silicon Graphics Onyx :) and a matching UNIX server and running one of the high end CAD packages like UG or IDEAS or Catia. As always benchmark first!
Regards,
--
#include <disclaimer.h>
Christopher Miller
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Miscrosoft will release a new 64-bit XP operating system fairly soon. It will certainly have its problems at first, but eventually that should improve performance significantly by increasing the amount of available RAM space.
That might be a better route than adding a ton of UNIX hardware and having a hybrid OS/net environment.
James
<<>> wrote:> I'd suggest looking into a very fast 64-bit UNIX workstation(s) (like a

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