MUD Base Plastic Mold Models

It doesn't seem DME publishes MUD base models.
Is there another source to keep me from drawing things up myself?
Many Thanks - Bo
Reply to
Bo
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Reply to
JF
But they have only a few accessory parts in their online listing.
Reply to
Bo
look under the "Companion Insert Molds"
Reply to
JF
I see a short list of numbers, but no frames, and the buttons don't work on the parts I clicked.
I don't think DME wants the info documented outside their shop.
Maybe I ought to put up the couple of MUD bases I have drawn up.
Bo
Reply to
Bo
.
First question is why in the world do you want the frame, unless you are going to build your own? In which case I can't blame DME for not giving you their data for that. :) If you are buying insert sets for an existing frame, then all you would need is the inserts.
However, if you know anybody with MoldWorks, have them generate a frame for you. Back when I used it, there was no way to have MW create just the inserts-it was all or nothing.
Good Luck,
jk
Reply to
jk
You can get MUD clones at Progressive. I think it's:
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Look under Products for Unit Inserts.
HTH,
Malcontent Southern California's Four Seasons: Earthquake, Mudslide, Brushfire, and Riot
Reply to
Malcontent
Bo,
I can't figure out "WHY" anyone would be so obsessively secretive about something you could measure and model so easily as a MUD frame. Some companies internal policies are really stupid beyond belief. They even make it difficult for you to design around their product by forcing you to go through a ridiculous registration process before you can have the "PRIVILEGE" of getting CAD data so you can make THEM money. Screw em !!!
If you want to see how a vendor web site should be go to Stock Drive Products, or Bimba.
rant over,,,
Mark
Reply to
MM
It has nothing to do with "building your own" MUD Base. DME/MUD give you enough information to copy a MUD base if you want to do that, but I think it is cheaper to buy direct from DME. What I have done on prior MUD bases I've used are modifying the frames so I can lay out custom modifications like stripper plates and core retainer plates for using ejector sleeves, and sometimes make custom mounting plates to mount small MUD bases.
It is merely a starting point to analyze how to do a better custom mold layout for my purposes, as a standard base won't do the job. By now I have already created the stock MUD 16/21 UF321, and now modified it to try to squeeze in what I have to live with.
I have a limited maximum die height in my JSW 110 = 15.7" and 16" clear between the tie bars. I need 4 inserts of a given size around 6" square to handle my range of parts with their own cooling. I need a specific ejection stroke and a stripper plate I have parts requiring certain ejector & cavity plate thicknesses I need to get cooling in better than the typical mold and not "run out of space" in the cavity backup plates, and avoid or modify the bottom of my custom base and avoid leader pins & tie bars I want the cavity inserts sets to be self contained with their stripper rings. I want a custom leader pin setup so I can easily hold & slide plates apart on leader pin extensions so I can more easily, safely, & quickly change the inserts (because some of the plates are 300 pounds).
I don't really know whether I'll have a pseudo-MUD base or something different made, but the "inside" has to be packaged first before I can look further.
I need to know whether I can cram in what I need in a limited space without making complexities which will drive the mold cost up. Once I figure I know approximately where I am, I will have to take my jumble of parts to a professional mold designer who REALLY knows production molds and have him detail everything correctly, and tell me whether I am nuts or OK on my assumptions.
The whole reason for doing inserts is we have lots of existing & new part designs but not enough volume to do a dedicated mold for any one of the parts, let alone all of them. If the volume ever rose, we would look at deadicated molds (as we have for many parts). The insert mold obviously makes it easier to try a new product as a side benefit, and lots of the new product features can't be judged well enough from rapid prototypes, when it comes to snap fits and deformations and such. We still have to learn 'the hard way' in some things when we stretch the limits of knowledge.
Bo
Reply to
Bo
Yeah, actually, I think there are probably a half dozen companies doing insert plate sets for MUD bases if not also copying their frames.
MUD frames and inserts are really a commodity at this point. If you want nitrided, or stainless or aluminum you might buy from one company or another, but they've all copied MUD.
Bo
Reply to
Bo
PCS has cad data for their version of MUD bases.
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Reply to
moldingman
They do not go up beyond about 10x14 on base size, though.
Bo
Reply to
Bo
Bo, MUD used to make an electronic catalogue available. I have it here and its is only 3D wire frame but even that is better than nothing. If they won't give you a copy let me know and I will see if I can send you one.
Reply to
J. R. Carroll
Yes, I've seen that and have it, thanks. Frankly, it is faster to just read the pdf catalog and construct the solids in a sketch driven assembly, so that everything in SolidWorks is related to the sketch (at least at the start, until I break the relationships).
Later - Bo
Reply to
Bo

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