SolidWorks or ProE?

Hello group, this topic may have been posted before but my firm is looking
to either get SolidWorks or ProE to do our design work.
Our main work is machine design which consist of 1000 parts or more.
Can anyone give any advice on which would be the best for us?
Thanks in advance
Eric
Reply to
CDC
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It is such a large business decision to move to either package, that I would say the $s are going to be significant.
The decision for even a smallish company might be well worth looking at a consultant to help you work through things.
In addition to what others have noted here, you also want to consider where new hires will come from. If your geographical area has a very large population of designers who work with ProE (for example), and all else is equal, you may be better able to get contract work or new hires from that pool of workers, or the other way around if it is SolidWorks.
Issues of document management with both packages will be critical, and so will be the training time and cost.
Then will likely come some conversion of legacy paper data for reuse, spares & repairs, etc, whether done in house or jobbed out to local guys on a contract basis.
Bo
Reply to
Bonobo
CAD vs CAD/CAM? (from another reply)
No company would buy SolidWorks if you couldn't get the machine tools to work off the solids files. SolidWorks has 3rd party partners who supply such solutions, and there are variations to suit the customer needs
Bo
Reply to
Bonobo
both have their merits. You should also look at SolidEdge, and possibly Alibre
Reply to
Michael
Buy the design tool most suitable for your design work. Make vendors demonstrate software on your turf.
Buy the CAM software most suitable for your machining work. Use your own sample parts for demonstrations.
Don't worry about getting it all in one package. Get stuff that works for you. Don't pay for stuff that doesn't.
Put cost near the bottom of your priorities. Make sure you get tools that you will use. Cheap tools you can't use are infinitely more costly in terms of productivity lost than tools that work well.
Reply to
That70sTick
Eric
I went through this process recently, and decided on Solidworks. Although I didn't look that closely at ProE, I did look at Solidedge and Alibre among others and SW was best for us. Smart components are amazing in SW.
Rich
Reply to
Rich
You will probably find the SolidWorks interface more friendly and easier to learn and use. In general, Pro/E will probably be much faster (regen time) for large assemblies.
Machine design is probably one of the things SolidWorks focuses on, although it can do other things as well. If you are doing a lot of sheetmetal, SolidWorks would probably be the better choice.
In terms of the other software like Solid Edge, it may be roughly equivalent software, but SolidWorks has a much larger install base, which means there are more resources available (employees who already know it, contractors, user groups, etc). Alibre would be for pretty basic work. Doesn't have much of the real power of the others.
Reply to
matt
Cliff,
Solidworks with Camworks, or Solidcam, is as much a CAD/CAM system as Catia with NCL. Fully associative, fully integrated.
Mark
Reply to
Mark Mossberg
On 16 Sep 2005 06:11:14 -0700, "Bonobo"
tool
wh
custome
SW is NOT a CAD/CAM package. It is CAD only You lose a lot when you do translations, including associativit to the design model This may or may not matter NOW in your "business model" (i your or someone's opine) but it is indeed a total process cost -- Cliff[/quote:610ffd69e1
Looks like Cliff is a Pro-E guy. It might be that you loose a lot i
translations from Pro-E, but no one NEEDED CAM software to translat to from Pro-E since its built in. As far as I know, CAM Package recommended by SW fit like a glove on a hand
Reply to
dper
Mark, you are replying to a person who has a mind being run by a tape on a loop.
Reply to
Bonobo

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