Air Brush choice

Hello,
I am in the market for an air brush and have read about the Badger
line, but don't know what would be best for a beginner that wants to
be able to grow and not find my choice lacking later on.
Any suggestions or observations are most welcome.
Thanks,
Michael
Reply to
mpicco
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I bought onr of the cheap models years ago, the non-adjustable types that use a can of Propel. I'm still using it and it has worked fine. But I wish I had bought a better one with a compressor. It seems I am always waiting for a can of Propel when I need to use it, and the LHS is an hour away. I would consider the #150 with a Whirlwind compressor to be adequate for all my needs. [I already have a good 8-ounce automotive touch-up sprayer and compressor for large jobs.]
snipped-for-privacy@megapathdsl.net wrote:
Reply to
harrym
You have two choices: 1.) Go ahead and spend the money to get a good brush and a compressor, with which you will be happy for years.
2.) Get a cheap brush and cans of air that will frustrate and aggravate you and still will not yield an acceptable result.
You can get a Campbell-Hausfield compressor at the Home Depot
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or try this:
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Then you need a good brush. For about the same price that your local craft or hobby store will sell you a junker brush, you can get a Paasche H from Dixie Art Supply
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Thirty dollars (US) plus a little change. It is the best value you are likely to find anywhere. The Paasche H is an excellent tool for someone who has no previous experience with airbrushing. It works equally well in the hands of an experienced painter.
Come back here if you have more questions and/or want to talk about paints and techniques.
Be careful that you do not spend too much for a tool. But, if you do, all you have lost is a little money. Be more careful that you pay enough. If you buy cheap tools, not only will your money be spent, but the tool will not perform the task for which it was purchased. The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
........F>
Reply to
Captain Handbrake
There are two key parameters in classifying air brushes - single or double action, and internal or external mix:
Action refers to what your finger can control - just air flow (single action) or both air flow and paint flow (double action) - note that you can still control paint flow in a single action brush, but you preset it before applying the paint. IMO, you need double action if you are going to be finely shading the blush on the Amazon warrior-maiden's cheek on the side of a chopper's fuel tank, or maybe the fine wisp of boiler compound residue from a leaking valve on the jacket of an Espee cab forward. If you are going to be doing general overall painting of models, more broadly applied weathering, and limited fine application of color, single action is sufficient, and much easier to master.
Mix refers to where the air passes through the venturi producing the low pressure area that drags the paint into the air stream - inside the air brush (internal mix) or just outside the tip (external mix). External mix air brushes usually have an angled conical structure hanging below the main part of the brush; the paint passes through the conical part while the air flows (and is controlled) through the main body of the brush. Internal mix is better suited to fine work, but is more difficult to thoroughly clean.
I started with a Thayer and Chandler (no longer made) model E single action internal mix brush, and liked it, but went through a lot of pipe cleaners cleaning it. I also have a Badger double action internal mix (bought through Sears), which works well, but does not get much use. I have two Paasche model H single action external mix air brushes (both obtained as very good bargains at local flea markets) which have become my primary tools. They are easy to use and clean, give good results, and parts are readily available (important to me after getting stuck with the unrepairable T&C). I keep one set up with the coarse tip (overall painting), and one with a medium (painting masked areas and weathering) - for any fine work I use the Badger. By the way, I replaced the plastic handle of the Paasche with the optional metal one - I like the balance of the all metal brush much better. I also picked up a used inexpensive Binks Wren single action external mix, but find it flimsy compared to the Paasche, and harder to adjust just right. I should note most of my painting is still with solvent based Floquil, followed by ScaleCoat, DuPont auto primer, and least, artist's acrylics.
I use a Sears two cylinder, 1/2 HP, 2.8 cfm @40 psi, 100psi cut-off, with 7 cuft tank compressor obtained years ago at a Craftsman Tool Week super sale. I use a moisture separator and regulator to deliver adequately dry low pressure air for air brush use, but find the larger capacity has more than paid for itself in inflating car tires before trips, painting louvered shutters on the house, sand blasting rusted antiques, cleaning sawdust out of workshop tools, air drying Lionel parts after cleaning, exercising a Leslie Trifon 5-chime Diesel horn, etc.
Hope these observations help. Gary Q
Reply to
Geezer
On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 21:47:32 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@megapathdsl.net wrote: 2000
As others have told you the Paasche H is hard to beat. It is easy to learn on and use and is still useful when you become an expert. Its limitations may point you in a more suitable direction or you may end up using it forever. Either way you cannot lose with it.
Reply to
Ernie Fisch
I have to concur the Paasche H is great for model trains. I use it for solvent and water base paints. Just keep it clean and it will give years of good service. One thing to remember no matter what paint you are using make sure you have adequate ventilation. Not doing that can have dire consequences.
Reply to
mike
Hi:
Setting up a painting facility requires some thought to avoid pitfalls and waste of money. There are many facets which must be tailored to fit our needs and pocket book. To achieve the optimum results, a thorough understanding of the functions of each component is necessary.
Using an airbrush since 1963 and selling them since 1969, much experience and feedback has been used to develop the articles on my site. Before jumping in, it might be wise to examine this info and others. There are many opinions on the subject.
Over 90% of the brushes sold were Paasche, with the VL first and the H second.
A little effort and planning can prevent a lot of grief.
For more details with methods and extensive discussion of problems and solutions, see first site below in spray painting..
Hope this helps.
Thank you,
Budb
Author of:
MODELRAILROAD TECHNICAL INFORMATION
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PROTOTYPE TECHNICAL INFO FOR MODELRAILROADERS (Revised. New address)
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Moderator of: MR TECHNICAL HELP GROUP
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COUPLER HELP GROUP
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snipped-for-privacy@megapathdsl.net wrote:
Reply to
bigbud
Another option for you. I bought an Aztec system that included a compressor. The compressor is very quiet and so far I can't complain about anything with the system. The air brush is both single and double action so I can vary it if I need. I have used it both with water based and solvent based paint and both work very well. Personally like the water based better. Don't need to wear a respirator and vent the entire basement like I do with the solvent based. The compressor gives out a constant 20 psi which some will say is not enough. It also has none of the gauges some like. Depends how much you are really going to use it as to what you really need. Also brush painting isn't all that bad for many uses.
Chuck Callaghan snipped-for-privacy@virginia.edu
Reply to
Charles Callaghan
If you want to spend more money (and who doesn't ? ;-}), I bought a "Silent Aire" compressor from the Dick Blick catalog (online: DickBlick.com). I bought the 20-A model. It has an internal tank along with a regulator and moisture trap. It works by pumping up the tank to pressure (set with the included gauge), and then running the pump periodically as the tank requires. It is essentially SILENT. It is an oil compressor, but I've used it now for three years and only had to top off the oil twice. The downside: it costs $500 or so. SilentAire does have a less expensive "Scorpion" model for $150, but I don't think it uses a tank and I don't know how quiet it is or how well it eliminate the "pulsing" some compressors cause without the buffer of a tank, never having used one.
But I think having a very quiet compressor with pressure gauge, moisture trap, and good regulation is very important. A noise compressor is fatiguing during long use. Whatever you get for a compressor, try it out in a quiet environment to see how noisy it is.
I use two airbrushes: the Aztec double-action (very easy to clean) and a Pasche VL (harder to clean, but a better quality brush, though more practice is required to achieve the excellent results of which it is capable).
Even if you use water based paints, you need to provide positive ventilation. Those little paint particles can't be good for your lungs even if there are no noxious fumes to go with them. I use a paint booth with a filtered, powered vent to the outside.
The least expensive option to start out is to get any of the above suggested airbrushes (including the Badger to initially enquired about) and use canned compressed air. You will know when you are painting enough to justify a good compressor.
Ed
in article cppsb1$pss$ snipped-for-privacy@murdoch.acc.Virginia.EDU, Charles Callaghan at snipped-for-privacy@virginia.edu wrote on 12/15/04 9:27 AM:
Reply to
Edward A. Oates
I agree completely. I have both a Paasche H and VL brush. The VL is more capable ... and a LOT harder to clean and use. I use the H for about 95% of my hobby painting ... and the VL when I *NEED* it (mostly for delicate shading when painting anime figures, or for camouflage work on military models). It'll be hard to ever outgrow the H, and even if you get a better brush, you may still find yourself using the H by choice for more mundane things.
Dan Mitchell ============
Reply to
Daniel A. Mitchell
Is it practical to use compressed air from a bottle, say something like a scuba tank?
What are the considerations for doing so?
RWBooneSr
Reply to
RWBoone
I have been looking at airbrush sets also, but would like to know if I can use my pancake compressor I have good control of psi and cfm's, but would like to know if it will work well for air brushing.
Thanks ChrisGW
Reply to
ChrisGW
Yes, but it will likely cost more than a compressor from Husky or Campbell-Hausfield. Even if you alredy have tanks, you will have to get regulators that can reduce pressure to 50 PSIG and lower ( 0 - 50 PSIG is a good range), and that are NOT on-demand, because an airbrush cannot demand air. You have to have pressure at the trigger.
........F>
Reply to
Captain Handbrake
Pancake compressors typically work just fine for almost any airbrush.
........F>
Reply to
Captain Handbrake
Thank You
Reply to
ChrisGW
While you're waiting for the Propel why don't you use the other compressor to inflate a spare tire or a converted 30# Freon cznnister as a compressed air resevoir?
Bob
Reply to
Robert Dietz
sIt' Yes, this can be done. Obviously, you need a regulator with an appropriate high pressure range to match the tank. Output (spraying) pressures will be in the 5 psi - 35 psi range, depending on the airbrush and type of paint being sprayed.
One possible problem ... compressed air from ANY sources notorious for containing moisture. All sorts of schemes to remove it are in common use (traps, filters, dryers, etc.). Perhaps a better solution in the same vein is to use a cylinder of Carbon Dioxide or Dry Nitrogen obtained form a welding supply ... these will contain no moisture.
For short term use, a low pressure (say, 100 psi) compressed air tank like those sold at garage supplies to carry in you car trunk can be used ... but they only last a few minutes of spraying. Some even use a large truck tire for the purpose (cost effective, only IF you already have an extra one, and the space for it).
For most hobby applications, the best solution is a small compressor. It'll be the cheapest option in the long run. the only downsides are initial cost and noise. The noise can be eliminated by spending more money on the compressor.
Dan Mitchell ============
Reply to
Daniel A. Mitchell
Such a compressor should work fine if the regulator will work dependably at the low pressure used by airbrushes (5-35 psi) ... some DON'T. These compressors are intended of air tools like air-nailers, that normally work at much higher pressures. The relatively small tank on these will require the compressor to 'cycle' more frequently than with a larger tank, but that's only a noise issue.
Dan Mitchell ============
Reply to
Daniel A. Mitchell

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