Athearn P42 defective?

I just got an Athearn RTR AMD 103 (P42 Genesis) locomotive -- brand new.
I notice that it doesn't stop immediately if the power is cut -- it rolls a bit
then stops. The faster it goes the longer it takes to stop unless I switch to
reverse. Is this normal? Is it defective?
It's the first loco that I own that does this (it's my sixth one.)
Thanks.
Reply to
Chris
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I have an older AMD103 (not RTR), and the flywheels do let it move a bit after power is cut, the more the faster the motor is turning. It helps the engine run smoothly with varying power which somewhat dirty track might provide. It is not the same as "momentum" which some analog power packs, and DCC can provide. At scale 60mph, it should take about 15 to 30 feet top do an emergency stop.
Ed.
in article snipped-for-privacy@no.com, Chris at snipped-for-privacy@no.com wrote on 9/28/03 3:24 PM:
Reply to
Edward A. Oates
It has flywheels in it!
Reply to
Jon Miller
Um I believe the answer is yes this is by design. The product description says "dual brass flywheels".
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flywheels add mass to the motor shafts and create a momentum effect. With DC power this is highly desirable to get the locomotive over minor electrical glitches in the track to prevent stalls and make the locomotive run smoother. With command control it is a mixed blessing because when power is cut the spinning fly wheels turn the motor into a generator that pumps current backward into the decoder.
What other locomotives do you own? I thought almost everything but the base Lifelike & Tyco type stuff had flywheels these days.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
Thanks for the answer. I thought it might be by design because it didn't look like it was slipping. It does look proper when it slows down when compared to scale. I do use analogue right now, but I haven't had any stalls on my layout. I'm waiting for a stall though (I must be lucky.) DCC is coming soon.
I have two F7a locos from the late '80s when I started model railroading -- both are by Bachmann and are very weak (I haven't bought Bachmann since.) Each uses rubber bands on the last two wheels. I hate bands.
I have a F40 by Lifelike. Lifelike might as well be called Bachmann. Again, it uses rubber bands. It's also weak.
I have two F40s by Walthers that I bought about six months ago. They are really good value for the money. I can't complain. They are working almost every day without any problems, other than the couplers, which I've replaced with Kadees. Those locos definitely aren't weak, but they aren't powerhouses either. Each pushes and pulls five Athearn Bombardier coaches, but could easily do ten. They have all wheel electric pickup and drive. I'm not sure if it has a flywheel, but it doesn't slide like the P42.
When compared to the Lifelike F40, the ones by Walthers look so much better. I try not to run the Lifelike while the Walthers are running because the difference is noticeable.
When I convert to DCC, the Bachmanns and Lifelike are gone.
Reply to
Chris
Maybe you finally got one with decent flywheels and bearings. They are supposed to coast when the power is cut. Many times, things aren't quite lined up, bearings are tight, etc., causing the coasting to not happen as much.
Reply to
Steve Hoskins
I'd suggest keeping the LifeLike F40 and converting it into a non-powerd "cabbage"unit as Amtrak did.....they are non-powered control baggage units now. Just cut a roll-up baggage door into each side, and repaint it.
Reply to
Steve Hoskins
Yes, this was back in the Bachmann toy train days. Bachmann now has three lines. Just normal Bachmann is like you've discovered, cheap toy train stuff. Then they have the "Plus" line, and the "Spectrum" line. Supposedly each is better than the next. I've found some of the Spectrums to be very good especially the passenger cars and steam locomotives. I have several of the 2-8-0s that I really like. However some friends have had some that were lemons. In general, they say it is a good product but the quality assurance isn't there to make it consistently good.
Lifelike also continues to make toy train cheap stuff, but they also have two other lines the Proto 1000, and Proto 2000. I've had excellent luck with both and highly recommend them.
Walthers locomotives generally have a single fly wheel and should have some momentum effect. It is just probably consumed by internal friction.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman

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