Backdrops???

Anybody got any recomendations for a backdrop material? I was wondering what is used for one that can be curved to follow a winding route through
the middle of the room. About 3 or 4 feet wide (tall).
So far the stuff that I have tried is either too stiff to curve, like masonite, or something like a flooring roll but is too flimsy to hold itself up. Having no seams would be great also.
Thanks AD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com says...

Styrene (joints every 8'), aluminum flashing, or vinyl runners.
I've used the first two and prefer styrene. With a backing plate and a little MEK, the joints are all but invisible.
The flashing has no joints, but I found it hard to hang without any ripples. Additional hands might have solved that problem.
The vinyl has been suggested by many - I'm sure someone who's used it will comment.
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 May 2005 09:03:53 -0700, lgb wrote:

I didn't even know that styrene came in that size. Where do you get it? Or what is it used for? Is it the same stuff that you pay 5 bucks for an ounce of 1/8" strips at the hobby shop?
krf
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, same stuff. High impact polystyrene is available in 8' x 4' sheeps at a fraction of the price you pay for Evergreen (as an example). Using local (Aust) prices as a guide, some years back I priced a sheet as above, .125" thick, at $17Au. A piece in my LHS at the same time, but about 8 inches by 4 inches, was $6. Look under "plastics" in the yellow pages, or google with "high impact polystyrene".
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oops - obviously, should be "sheets" :-)
No I'm not a kiwi.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Here in Fort Myers, FL we have a local plastics supplier that sells 4x8 sheets of styrene at very reasonable costs. 20 mil is $13 and 40 mil is $15. We have to go to Tampa to get other thicknesses, but there is a supplier their who will sell styrene in thicknesses rangeing from 10 mils and up in 10 mil increments, 4x8 foot sheet(p?)s that he will cut up into 4- 2x4 sheets and ship it to us. Buy enough and the shipping cost is minimal.
Look in the Yellow pages for Plastics suppliers. Call them. Peter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought mine from a local plastics company. Apparently it's used by those who want to build their own shower and bath enclosures.
I paid around $15 for a 4x8 sheet of 060" white styrene. I don't know what other thicknesses are available.
One thing I didn't know at the time. I've been told that if you bend it to the desired radius and then heat it up with a heat gun that it will take a set. Not knowing that, I used a backup of stiff foamcore to hold the curves - next time I'll try the heat.
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've been very partial to plasterboard (another name for drywall) for backdrops. The stuff is very selfsupporting and is easily bent with the proper procedures. Gentle curves of 10' or so radius can be put in without any work other than providing a plywood (3/4") curves on top and bottom and one in the middle if desired. Shorter radius curves need to have the plasterboard wetted so that the plaster softens a bit. Don't soften the plasterboard too much or it becomes a real bear to move about as it will ding very easily and doesn't want to support itself at all. Again plywood formers to support the curve are a very good idea. I've done plasterboard to a 3' radius once so the stuff will bend nicely. Any good drywaller will probalby know about the process of wetting it and getting it to bend to curves. It is often done with arches and so forth for the curved part of the arch. The nice thing about plasterboard is that you can completely hide the eams with the mud that they use to join panels.
-- Why isn't there an Ozone Hole at the NORTH Pole?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've used 1/8" Masonite with great results, splicing the sheets together with 1x4 and drywall screws. The seams are concealed with Bondo, then sanded. You can form it to to 12" radius with effort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At my club, we are using MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard). It's great stuff as it cuts and drills almost like wood. It has a high glue content that resists humidity (tho' you should prime it when painting). And while it is stiffer than Masonite, it's still pretty flexible. I know at our club we've got it stretched around a couple tight corners (~12" radius).
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used 1/4" MDF. Bends well and holds it own shape. Very smooth also and easy to paint. No undercoat required.
Nigel
--
Western Pacific Model Railways
http://www.wave.co.nz/~lakewood/MyWP.htm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.