Cork roadbed transition?

I'm building an N-scale layout using Atlas code-55 flex track sections
with a foam board base. The track will have a cork roadbed where it runs
in rural areas, to simulate a raised roadbed. However there are areas in
the layout where the tracks (ties) should be level with the ground. How
should I lay the track in those areas? IOW- How do you make the
transition from cork roadbed to laying the track directly on the foam
board?
Thanks
Reply to
D&Hfan
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Good Morning!
Probably the most difficult but best for the RR is to sink the foam underneath the cork section so the train itself does not make a transition -- and this assumes that you are using cork underneath the foam -- then blend scenery to hide this difference in height of the foam base.
Another suggestion for an actual track transition is to cut a section of foam to make a grade to adjust to the differences in height and then be creative using weeds and shrubs to mask the transition piece.
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James B. Holland
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Reply to
Jim Holland
I have gled cork to plywood, then used a sureform tool to 'sand' it to a taper.....
Jim Bernier
D&Hfan wrote:
> I'm building an N-scale layout using Atlas code-55 flex track sections > with a foam board base. The track will have a cork roadbed where it runs > in rural areas, to simulate a raised roadbed. However there are areas in > the layout where the tracks (ties) should be level with the ground. How > should I lay the track in those areas? IOW- How do you make the > transition from cork roadbed to laying the track directly on the foam > board? > > Thanks > >
Reply to
Jim Bernier
Take it from me, you want WOOD under your cork roadbed.
At the club that I belong to, we are in the process of redoing a 12x24 modular layout, it was build on a foam board and the foam is deteriorating, so much so that the tracks are vibrating and the trains are uncoupling.
Our mandate now is to make the table, L girder construction, cookie cutter the right of way with wood, glue cork to the wood then tracks to the cork. Foam will only beused for the scenic area.
There is a fellow on The Gauga Forum
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who is using this method. His layout has to be seen to be believed. Two levels and there are pictures of 100 car trains running the mainline.
Well worth the look.
Reply to
wannandcan
I did it once with card stock in HO scale. I hand lay wood ties and Railcraft rail and needed to bring a main line on cork roadbed down to a flat homosote based yard. First cut very small pieces and stack them to determined how many it takes to equal the height (thickness)of your cork roadbed. Example: If you have a length of track about say 24" for the transition and it takes 8 layers of cardstock to build up height to the cork roadbed, Divide 24 by 8 is 3.5 so first cut a piece of cardstock 24" long and as wide as cork roadbed as your base. Next cut one 3.5" shorter (20.5") and stack them together and repeat the process (3.5" shorter each time) to build a transition to the height you need. I glued them together and sanded the sides to match the roadbed then painted it gray and covered with ballast.
> I'm building an N-scale layout using Atlas code-55 flex track sections > with a foam board base. The track will have a cork roadbed where it runs > in rural areas, to simulate a raised roadbed. However there are areas in > the layout where the tracks (ties) should be level with the ground. How > should I lay the track in those areas? IOW- How do you make the > transition from cork roadbed to laying the track directly on the foam > board? > > Thanks > > >
Reply to
Bruce Gilfillan
Glue the cork down starting at the point where you wan to begin the transition. Then take a belt sander with a real coarse grit belt - say 50 - and sand a taper on the cork.
Dale.
D&Hfan wrote: > I'm building an N-scale layout using Atlas code-55 flex track sections > with a foam board base. The track will have a cork roadbed where it runs > in rural areas, to simulate a raised roadbed. However there are areas in > the layout where the tracks (ties) should be level with the ground. How > should I lay the track in those areas? IOW- How do you make the > transition from cork roadbed to laying the track directly on the foam > board? > > Thanks > > >
Reply to
Dale Gloer
I'm building an N-scale layout using Atlas code-55 flex track sections with a foam board base. The track will have a cork roadbed where it runs in rural areas, to simulate a raised roadbed. However there are areas in the layout where the tracks (ties) should be level with the ground. How should I lay the track in those areas? IOW- How do you make the transition from cork roadbed to laying the track directly on the foam board? ------------------------------------------------ This is where a piece of AMI Instant Roadbed comes in handy! You don't need to buy a roll of it, though. AMI also makes "Insta Base" (#AAR-18), an 18"x8-/4"x1/8" sheet of the uncured butyl rubber.
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Reply to
Bill
I'm not using cork, but Woodland Scenics foam roadbed, but what I did was to use the foam roadbed sheets (12"x24") in those "level" areas, like yards. Alternatively, you would use 1/4" thick foam sheets from WS in a similar manner.
Oh, and I'm in HO, so the thickness for N might be less.
Ed.
in article snipped-for-privacy@storefull-3198.bay.webtv.net, Bill at snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote on 3/4/04 5:06 PM:
Reply to
Edward A. Oates

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