Correct Driver Quartering

I believe I read someplace, though I can't find the reference now, that the "standard" for US RR's was to quarter steam loco drivers with "right hand
leading". My understanding is that this means the piston/valve event on the right (engineer's) side occurs 90 degrees ahead (in forward rotation of the drivers) of the same event on the left (fireman's) side. Thus when the rods are down on the right side (6:00 position), the crankpins are forward (closest to the cylinders, or 3:00 position as seen from the right side looking at the back of the left side drivers) on the left side. Thus the loco has to move forward 1/4 driver rev before the left side drivers get to the rods down position. I also understand that the Pennsy, the Standard RR of the World, was non-standard and quartered it's loco drivers the other way, with the left side leading. Can someone confirm my understandings and provide a source reference?
Given that my understanding is correct, it is interesting to check the quartering on HO steam locos. In a quick review, I see that my Rivarossi locos are consistently "correct" with right hand lead quartering, and my Bower PRR models are "correct" with left hand lead quartering. I am surprised to find that my old Mantua/Tyco steamers, none of which are PRR prototypes, are all quartered with left hand lead. I'm curious - does anyone have both the BLI C&O and PRR 2-10-4's who can check whether the quartering is reversed on the two models? (Or did the War Production Board, in granting PRR permission to build duplicates of the C&O T-1's, require the PRR to deviate from it's prior quartering practice on the J-1's?) Geezer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Geezer wrote:

That has to be a yank egotism!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Procter wrote:

[in regards to quartering]

Behave yourself, whippersnapper. It was a PRR egotism! Also note that their standards were followed by nobody but them.
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gannon.edu wrote:

I always do! =8^)

Ok - it's just when anyone mentions the World I feel as though the comment may well relate to me.

Yeah, I was searching for any parallels - there's the gauge, but that normally gets blamed on the Stephensons, not the PRR! So, it's like the US baseball "World Series"!

Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's a reason for their 'World Series'. It's simply because they don't care to know that there is a world outside of their borders. Their world is actually a very small self-centered place. {;^)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<PLONK>
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/05 9:15 AM, in article 6OydnQr1q9nlZuTenZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com, "Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote:> <PLONK>

Quite unlike everyone in New Zealand, of course.
--
Thanks!

Brian Ehni
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ehni:
Now now, all GP said was 'Yank'; BS is from Canada, and as we all know,
if you gently inform Canadians that there may well be civilization outside their borders, they will have Nunavut.
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 08:46:25 -0800, pawlowsk002 wrote:

Groan!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gannon.edu wrote:

I didn't say "Yank" which I understand has negative connotations within the USa. I said "yank" which is a term understood world-wide as meaning 'citizens of the USa' and has _no_ negative connotations other than being understood world-wide as meaning 'citizens of the USa'. If I wanted to insult you and your nation I would either be more blatant or more subtle. OTOH I find the Usa of the term "World" applied to something that excludes 95% of the world's population somewhat insulting.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Procter wrote:

GPfromNZ:
It's okay when WE say it, KIWI. Heh heh. Actually, I can't say I ever felt insulted by 'Yank', and I can't see why anybody else would, seeing as we use it ourselves so much...and everybody knows the old 'I'm a Cranky Old Yank in a Clanky Old Tank' song.
I was just making sure the egotism was credited to its original holder.
(and at any rate the British Great Western was no better...)
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gannon.edu wrote:

=8^P
Never heard of it!

Good move!

I don't feel any responsibility for the Brits!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gannon.edu spake thus:

Yes, but shouldn't you go on to explain the regional nature of the term "yank"? How it means one thing to a small-town Vermonter, another to any Vermonter, yet another to any resident of the Northeast, and still another to 'Merkins at large?
Once heard a fascinating description of this but can't remember where.
D "If you ask me I'll say I'm a Canuck" N
--
... asked to comment on Michigan governor George Romney's remark that
the army had "brainwashed" him in Vietnam-a remark which knocked Romney
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Nebenzahl wrote:

That's where we make the distinction of capitalizing "Yank" for whatever yanks what the name to mean and lowercase "yank" for the general term for citizens of the USa.
Regards, Greg.P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the USA at large, a Yankee is someone who lives in the North. In the North, it is someone who lives in the Northeast In the Northeast, is is someone who lives in New England. In New England, it is someone who lives in Maine In Maine, it is . . . you get the picture?
"Yankee" is actually a Dutch corruption of the15th Century pejoritive term "John Cheese" directed by the English, bent on colonizing North America, toward the Dutch, who were already there. With a Dutch accent, John Cheese becomes Jon Kees (Yon Keys) and from there it is a mere hop, skip, and jump to "Yankee". So if you aren't of Dutch ancestry, you can't be a Yankee in the first place.
Froggy,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 21:10:19 GMT, Froggy @ thepond..com wrote:

Oops I misspelled "pejorative" Froggy,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Froggy @ thepond..com spake thus:

Here's a variation of that I found:
To foreigners, a Yankee is an American. To Americans, a Yankee is a Northerner. To Easterners, a Yankee is a New Englander. To New Englanders, a Yankee is a Vermonter. And in Vermont, a Yankee is somebody who still uses an outhouse.

That seems to be one theory; there are others. Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankee for more information.
--
... asked to comment on Michigan governor George Romney's remark that
the army had "brainwashed" him in Vietnam-a remark which knocked Romney
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/15/05 9:01 PM, in article uixef.799$ snipped-for-privacy@newshog.newsread.com,

Since Wikipedia entries are subject to editing by the internet public at large, I would certainly hesitate to cite it as truth (which you, of course, did not).
Having said that, others report the word is derived from "Janke", a diminuitive of "Jan". This is cited by the Oxford English Dictionary, American Heritage Dictionary, and the Oxford Dictionary of Slang. See:
http://www.wordorigins.org/wordory.htm
Also, see:
http://www.answers.com/topic/yankee http://www.answers.com/topic/yankee-doodle (I like this one) http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Yankee
--
Brian Ehni



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Nov 2005 03:01:46 GMT, David Nebenzahl

Cute, but to a Vermonter, the word Yankee is just as likely to conjure up the city slicker image of Vrest Orton, a Vermonter who moved downcountry, and then back to Vermont to start the Vermont Country Store, to sell common products to city folks in Westchester and southern Connecticut that wanted to play backwoods pioneer.
Real Vermonters don't much go by the appellation of Yankee, and prefer to be called Vermonters (pronounced Vuh-MONT-(au)s - the end is not a flat Boston a, and not a "uh" but somewhere in between that only we know how to say - of course I'm only 7th generation, so I might be wrong :-))
And yes, a family I knew still used an outhouse even into the late 1970s. It was somewhat practical - outhouses don't get frozen plumbing midwinter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Nov 2005 05:42:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@electricrailroad.com wrote:

Perhaps not, butt I bet ~your~ plumbing gets a bit frosty.
Froggy,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.