G scale coupler question...

I recently purchased an LGB starter set (intended primarily
for around the Christmas tree initially, but I would over time
like to build a garden railroad). I noted after the fact that the
couplers on the difference manufacturers appear to be different
(hook and loop, knuckle, etc.). I have two questions:
1. Is there any one coupler style that is dominant?
2. Is it straight forward (possible) to change out the coupler
on rolling stock to allow mixing and matching?
Many thanks!
Dean
Reply to
D. Thompson
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=>I recently purchased an LGB starter set (intended primarily =>for around the Christmas tree initially, but I would over time =>like to build a garden railroad). I noted after the fact that the =>couplers on the difference manufacturers appear to be different =>(hook and loop, knuckle, etc.). I have two questions: => => 1. Is there any one coupler style that is dominant?
No.
=> 2. Is it straight forward (possible) to change out the coupler => on rolling stock to allow mixing and matching?
Varies with manufacturer, from relatively easy to quite difficult. There is no standard coupler pocket, you see. :-( Bachmann offers two types of couplers, but coupling w/ other mfr's products may be a problem, since there is no standard coupler height either. And then there's the problem that different trains are made to different scales... I suggest you standardise on one style of coupler, and do the best you can. Or just stay captive to one manufacturer, a option I personalkly don't like at all. Make a coupler height gage by mounting your coupler of choice to suit the most common coupler height you use.
=>Many thanks! =>Dean
**Footnote: There is no such thing as G "scale", despite what it says on the box. Even LGB makes trains of at least two different scales, 1:20.3 to represent 3ft narrow gauge trains, and 1:22 to represent metre gauge trains. And LGB started the the "G gauge" name! (It stands for both "gross" = "big" and "Garten" = "garden"). To represent standard gauge trains on G gauge track, the scale is 1:32, but Aristocraft uses 1:29 instead. It's a real mess -- but only the nitpickers worry about it. Most garden layouts use 1:24 for the buildings, because that's a doll-house scale, and so supplies and kits are easy to come by. The NMRA is trying to standardise both nomenclature and scales, and of course coupler height and wheel/track dimensions, to enable any "G" products to run on any 45mm gauge track. But it looks like an uphill battle to me.
Not to worry - just run whatever trains look good to you. Ask the hobby shop to put you in touch with other G gauge modellers, they will be an easy-going bunch, and will help you with your coupler and other problems.
HTH & Have Fun!
Wolf Kirchmeir ................................. If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? (Garrison Keillor)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Dean,
Kadee makes a G scale coupler height gauge for knuckle couplers. There is a picture of one on this Walthers web page.
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Fred Ellis
Reply to
Fred Ellis
[ Snip ]
Sorry, you have it backwards. There is no such thing as "G Gauge." There is a "G Scale."
The track gauge of 45mm is called Gauge 1 (one). The proportion of 1:22.5 is G scale. Yes, LGB came up with the scale, or at least made it popular, but the Gauge 1 dates from about the beginning of the 20th century.
This might help to explain some of the confusion:
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That will also lead to a handy chart of scales and gauges in the large scale world.
Yes, the whole thing is confusing, especially when people don't even agree whether "G" is a scale or a gauge.
-- Bill Kaiser snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
There are three ways to do a job: good, cheap, and quick. You can have any two. A good, cheap job won't be quick. A good, quick job won't be cheap. A cheap, quick job won't be good.
Reply to
<wkaiser
There are multiple "G" scales.
In fact it is neither. It is a _collection of scales_ on number 1 gauge track.
Greg.P.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
=>Wolf Kirchmeir wrote: => =>[ Snip ] => =>> **Footnote: =>> There is no such thing as G "scale", despite what it says on the box. Even => => =>Sorry, you have it backwards. There is no such thing as "G Gauge." There =>is a "G Scale." => =>The track gauge of 45mm is called Gauge 1 (one). The proportion of 1:22.5 =>is G scale. Yes, LGB came up with the scale, or at least made it popular, =>but the Gauge 1 dates from about the beginning of the 20th century.
"G scale" is 1:22.5 only when LGB models metre gauge trains. When they model US 3-ft gauge trains, they use a scale of 1:20.3 -- and still call it G scale. If even LGB doesn't care to keep its usage of G scale consistent, is it any wonder no one else does?
As for the gauge name - yeah, I know that 45mm gauge is Gauge 1. Gee, gosh, golly, I even know that standard gauge trains running on 45mm track are scaled at 1:32. But the general term for 45mm gauge now is G gauge - thanks to LGB. And to top it off, manufacturers, including LGB, have a tendency to obfuscate the distinction between scale and gauge - perhaps becaue they beleive the cutomers are to stoopid to understand. Bah, again.
LGB makes beautiful trains, but they have caused a lot of confusion.
Wolf Kirchmeir ................................. If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? (Garrison Keillor)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Yes, it is kind of a wonder. They were on board early, but are by no means the only manufacturer around these days.
You know it, and I know it, why not say it? Why perpetuate the confusion of sloppy thinkers and speakers?
For newcomers it's hard enough to understand the differences between things like HO, Sn3, HOn3, HOn30, HOn2-1/2 - and those are all well defined scale/gauge combinations. When anything built to a scale between 1/4" to 1-1/2" per foot and runs on track of 32, 45, or 64 mm. gauge is called "G gauge" and "G scale" the terms are confusing and all but meaningless. Maybe it's a losing battle, but at least Garden Railways Magazine is trying to promote and maintain some consistency in naming scales and gauges. Maybe NMRA is doing something about names and standards, but so far I've only heard the sound of dragging feet from them. Personally, I prefer to maintain some consistency in naming scales and gauges based on historical precedent or useful convention. So far the convention of the manufacturers is all but useless.
Maybe it is a losing battle to expect people to understand what they're saying. If something is bigger than Lionel 0 and smaller than a bread box and we call it "G Something" because we don't want to talk about scale or gauge or how they are related, then the sloppy thinkers and the ignorant have already won.
Reply to
<wkaiser
With LGB yes the hook and loop is dominant. I started with Kalamazoo, and Delton that also came with the hook and loop. Eventually I added a Bachmann that had the knuckle. I thought they looked better and began converting. What I discovered was that the hooks held so well when one car would derail and tip over - it took the whole train with it. I went back to the hook and loop. I only use G-gauage (1:20.5 for me) around the Christmas tree. They go around the small corners well, they do good in S-curves, they are fault tolerant, and easy to fix. My advice is to stick with the loops for the Christmas tree and have time to think it through.
Yes, put a different type of coupler on each end of a few cars. I did this on my N-scale layout for years because at the time I couldn't afford to switch wholesale to Kadee. I did it on my O-scale just because AHM was different from Atlas and I didn't want to do any converting.
Reply to
SleuthRaptorman
=>> As for the gauge name - yeah, I know that 45mm gauge is Gauge 1. Gee, gosh, =>> golly, I even know that standard gauge trains running on 45mm track are =>> scaled at 1:32. But the general term for 45mm gauge now is G gauge - thanks =>> to LGB. And to top it off, manufacturers, including LGB, have a tendency to =>> obfuscate the distinction between scale and gauge - perhaps becaue they =>> beleive the cutomers are to stoopid to understand. Bah, again. => => =>You know it, and I know it, why not say it? Why perpetuate the confusion =>of sloppy thinkers and speakers?
OK, if G scale is 1:22.5, then standard gauge for that scale would be 61.5mm., and LGB's scale/gauge would be called Gm, and 3ft gauge or Gn3 would have gauge of 40.6mm, and 2ft gauge or Gn2 would have a gauge of 27mm, and Gn30 or Gn2-1/2 would have a gauge of 33.8mm. And so on.
OTOH, if G scale is 1:20.3, then standard gauge for that scale would be 68mm, and Gm would be 49.2mm, Gn3 would be 45mm, Gn30 would be 37.5mm, 2ft gauge would be 30mm, and so on.,...
OTOH, the Brits use 16mm=1ft to represent -- well, what exactlly? 2ft gauge running on O scale track, or 3ft gauge running on 45mm track (well, it's a little fudge, but wotthehell, what's a 3 mm between friends?)
OTOH, if G gauge is 45mm, then G scale would be 1:32. What then do we call LGB's scale of 1:22.5? Gm? That doesn't make sense, for Gm would run on track of 31.2 mm gauge, or 32mm (O Gauge) for practical purposes. 3ft gauge in this scale would be 28.6mm, Gn30 would be 23.8mm, 2ft gauge would be 19mm (which is close to one of the "true" gauges for British OO, either EM or P4, I can't recall which.)
Oh hell, I give up.
Wolf Kirchmeir ................................. If you didn't want to go to Chicago, why did you get on this train? (Garrison Keillor)
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
[ Many scale and gauge numbers edited out ]
Aren't calculators wonderful!
Reply to
<wkaiser

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