Help with translating O to G.

What is the best method for translating an O scale layout design to G? Is there a factor to multiply the dimensions by?
Thank you in advance.
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video guy - www.locoworks.com spake thus:

Yes, there is. But I'm not going to tell you what it is.
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solve the problem: negotiations and peace with the Palestinians,
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Hello, and just go ahead and Google for it. There's a number of model RR websites that have a table of scales/gauges. for example,
http://www.spikesys.com/Modelrr/scales.html
I have been lurking on the r.m.r newsgroup for a while and get the distinct impression from the postings that there's greater interest in HO and smaller gauges/scales. There's a few of us that like scale trains that don't require the wearing of an eye loupe and jeweler's screwdrivers to maintain;-) Sincerely (from a enthusiastic fan of 3/16 inch = 1 foot scale trains),
John Wood (Code 5550) e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@itd.nrl.navy.mil Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5337
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

You don't really know, do you, David.
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video guy - www.locoworks.com spake thus:

I do, because I was actually paying attention when Miss Curtis was explaining fractions and ratios that day in math class.
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There is not one easy ratio. Factors include: 1) What kind of O scale plan you're starting with - Tinplate O-27, O-31, O-wide radius, or 2-rail with NMRA recommended radii? 2) What kind of G-gauge you are going to use - Aristo and USA Trains 1:29 models of standard gauge prototypes, Bachmann 1:24 models of narrow gauge prototypes, LGB 1:22.5 models of European meter gauge prototypes, Accucraft correctly proportioned 1:20.3 models of 3' gauge prototypes, or some other size? 3) What size G-gauge trains are you going to run - LGB 0-4-0T's with 4-wheel European wagons that are happy on the basic 24" radius G-gauge sectional track, Aristo U-25's and RS-3's with a 30" minimum, Aristo 2-8-2's and 2-8-8-2's with a 4' minimum, or something else? 4) What track system do you plan to use - LGB sectional, Aristo sectional, flex track, and/or something else? What size turnouts do you plan to use - LGB or Aristo 24" radius, LGB 4' radius, Aristo 5' radius, or LGB or Aristo #6's? Geezer
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Geezer wrote:

Please read the OP, I was asking for a way to translate dimensions. Curve radiuses and so on. That is, a ten foot wide board in O scale would be X foot wide in G. You see?
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Yes, we all see. The problem is you don't see.
There is no one G scale.
The following are all "G" Scale.
As "Geezer" pointed out, Aristo and USA Trains do 1:29 models of standard gauge prototypes, Bachmann does 1:24 models of narrow gauge prototypes, LGB does 1:22.5 models of European meter gauge prototypes, Accucraft does correctly proportioned 1:20.3 models of 3' gauge prototypes.
Which real world to model world version of G scale are you going to use?
Only when you decide that can anyone give you a ratio of what you need to multiply the O scale part by o get a G scale part.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

I will happily settle for 1:20.
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Your original question was about converting a *layout* - ie trackwork.
You were told that it depends on both what type of O scale layout you start with, and what kind of G scale layout you want to end up with.
You still have not answered the question about what kind of O-scale plan you are starting with, and you have not answered the question about what kind of G scale tracks you want to use.
But if you want a simpleminded answer, O-scale is 1:48, and G-scale is about 1:20.3. Scale factors are easily found by searching on www.google.com
Hence, to go from a measurement in O-scale to one in G-scale, you take your measurement and divide it by 48/20.3, ie by 2.36.
So - now you have "the answer" - one which you could have found for yourself by a quick search on google, followed by some simple 4th grade math.
No guarantee that a layout created by simply rescaling all measures this way will *work* very well - since the results will depend on what kind of G-scale tracks, curves and trains you are going to use.
But since that does not seem to be a concern of yours, why should it be a concern of anyone else ?
Grin, Stein
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Stein R wrote:

My original question was: > Is there a factor to multiply the dimensions by? Check the post, above.

Which has nothing to do with the dimensions.

It does not matter.

I asked for a simple answer, and instead I got a pageant.

Or by a courteous answer to my question, in this forum.
followed by some simple 4th grade

My point, exactly. Thank you for your help.

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Your original post said: --> What is the best method for translating an O scale layout --> design to G? --> Is there a factor to multiply the dimensions by?
It is certainly possible that *you* don't have enough CPU and/or memory to deal with two sentences in context, but for anyone else the second question would seem to be at least somewhat related to the first ...

Maybe your culture is different from mine. In mine, if you act like a rude asshole, people will tend to treat you like a rude asshole. It is called "cause and effect".
Good luck with your divisions.
Smile, Stein
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Stein R spake thus:

Oh, come on: I see why this guy's getting so annoyed. Typical Usenet snobbery, plain and simple.
The question he asked *was* simple enough, and has a simple answer. Even if, as has been pointed out, there are several versions of G scale, the answer is still simple: determine which of these scales is the one to be used, then use it to calculate the conversion factor. (Which, by the way, is simply the quotient of the two scales; sorry I was a little snarky in my answer up above.)
But you obviously prefer to play the game of escalating smugness. Good luck with that.
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Stein, I have been courteous and polite throughout this exchange, even when insulted, even now. What part of diminsions of the layout was so difficult to understand that it threw Geezer into fits, madly comparing 3-rail Maerklin to American Flyer standard gauge? I will readily admit that it is beyond me. But 2.36 is the factor I was looking for, and now that all the dick-waving, and "I'm smarter than you are, nanny-nanny boo-boo" is over, I thank you again.
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Geezer was just trying to be helpful, and was not thrown into fits. I was concerned for you in that if you convert your O gauge plan with the overly simplistic ratio you sought, you will come up with a G gauge plan that in all likelihood can not be implemented with any commercially available track, and if built may not reliably operate typical G gauge equipment. But it is now clear that it was my mistake to be concerned for you.
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Geezer wrote: . But it is

You may save your deep, heartfelt concern. The group here was asked a question, and instead of just posting an answer to that question you chose to post an answer in search of a question. I didn't need a pompous lecture on Scales 101 and didn't ask for one.
Like David Nebenzahl, who was up in study hall boning up on fractions while I was down in the band room boning up on Miss Curtis, you imagined yourself on some lofty railroad Olympus, crumbs of knowledge dripping from your lips, we grateful mortals down below..
I don't need your sanctimonious concern, if there was ever any there. Please do not try to help me again.
Do not bother to reply to this post.
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Your original post said: --> What is the best method for translating an O scale layout --> design to G? --> Is there a factor to multiply the dimensions by?
To me, this is *two* (related) questions, not "a question".
And the question "*is* there a factor to multiply the dimensions by ?" does not necessarily demonstrate a deep and thorough understanding of scales on your behalf.
Me - I am not "imagining myself on some lofty railroad Olympus".
I am just a newbie who can (and am *willing* to) do simple things like going to www.google.com and enter extremely simple queries like "G-scale O-scale proportions" (without the quotation marks), read a few web pages and find the answer to simple questions *myself*.
Instead of spending my time (and everybody elses time) whining about how others do evil stuff like actually trying to answer what appears to be the main question : "what is the *best* method for translating an O scale layout design to G ?".
The answer to *that* question might not be "just divide all measures by 2.36" or whatever the ratio between 48 and 20.3 was.
Incidentally - a lookup of G-scale O-scale proportions would also have clued you in on the fact the G-scale can be different thing to different people. Here is a little copy from the first page of google results::
--> The next largest locomotive is O scale (1:48 proportion) and the --> largest is in G scale (approximately a 1:29 proportion). ... --> www.greatesthobby.com/wgh/default.aspx?id&c=a - 32k - Cached - --> Similar pages --> --> Classic Toy Trains Magazine - Toy Train Layout Tips, Lionel - --> The ...O scale is a 1:48 proportion, which means 1 inch on the --> model's surface ... Of course G scale narrow-gauge track was --> about the same as the Number One gauge ... --> www.trains.com/ctt/default.aspx?c=a&idT4 - 30k - 7 Aug 2006 - --> Cached - Similar pages --> --> --> Classic Toy Trains Magazine - Toy Train Layout Tips, Lionel - --> The ...O scale is a 1:48 proportion, which means 1 inch on the --> model's surface represents 48 inches ... G scale is a 1:22.5 --> proportion, or .53 inches to the foot. ... --> www.trains.com/ctt/print.aspx?c=a&idT4 - 11k - --> Cached - Similar pages
As you can see - it is not an immediate given that by G-scale you mean 1:20.3. But since you had answered "I'll happily settle for 1:20" when this was pointed out by another poster, I gave you the ratio for 1:48 to 1:20.3, which was the closest alternative to your "1:20".
So I really don't see what you whining about *just* getting snotty answers was all about. Obviously David was snotty with you. Something about learning how to do fractions or some such thing.
And yet even that was relevant - time has shown you apparently *only* wanted an answer to the simple math question: what is the conversion ratio between 1:48 scale and 1:20 scale. And that you were too damned lazy to look up what proportions "O scale" was.
Dividing 48 by 20 is indeed a third grade math question which you should be able to calculate on your own.
Geezer was polite and gave you relevant info on your first question ("what is the best way of translating an O-scale layout design to G?"). Yet you acted (and continue to act) like Geezer had been rude to you. As I said : cause and effect. If you ask imprecise questions in the first place, and then act like an asshole when people point out the need for clarifications, then you are going to end up being treated like an asshole.
I suggest you take a little break and think about *why* some people (like e.g. me) are reacting in a negative way to your behavior, instead of spending your time on complaining about how stuck up everybody else are :-)
Now - back to the regularily scheduled DCC vs non-DCC religious wars :-)
Grin, Stein
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You are a jerk.
Goodbye.
<PLONK>
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Jim McLaughlin

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On 8 Aug 2006 19:51:49 -0700, "video guy -

And I hope that all here remember your graciousness through all of this if you ever again have need to ask a question of the group.
fl@liner
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video guy - www.locoworks.com wrote: [...]

Um, if you're talking _gauge_, the correct factor is 45/32, or 1:25. And you were talking _gauge_, right?
Scale is something else entirely. 2.36+/- is the factor for converting 1:48 scale narrow gauge (O scale, running on 19mm gauge) to 1:20.3 scale narrow gauge, which runs on 45mm gauge track. 1:20.3 is one of the many scales lumped together as "G gauge", which is a meaningless term IMO.
Both gauge and scale matter when converting layout designs. To convert an O gauge (32mm) design to G gauge (45mm) requires adjusting track dimensions (a matter of gauge) and scenic concepts, and selection/arrangement of structures (a matter of scale.)
See?
Have fun, no matter what!
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