Homasote to Plywood

I'm making a couple of 2' X 4' domino modules and plan to use a
plywood/homasote sub-base.
Hows the best way to fix the homasote to the plywood??
Duncan
Reply to
Kevin
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I would think a latex contact cement would be in order, but have you considered Micore instead of homasote? It's get better sound deadening properties, and it won't warp! Check it out at this URL
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Reply to
Frank Eva
Latex Liquid Nails, or any latex based glue (in caulking gun tubes), along with 1" screws every 6-9". Just don't use any polyurethane type glues, because they expand as they dry and it will make for a wavy surface.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
On my tinplate layout, I zig-zagged liquid nails [paneling adhesive] and set the 4x8 Homosote atop the 4x8 1/2" plywood. Then, using wallboard screws, screwed the homosote to the plywood, about every 8 inches, then next day, removed all of the wallboard screws.
Ray Hobin NMRA Life # 1735; TCA # HR-78-12540; ARHS # 2421 Durham, NC [Where tobacco was king; now The City of Medicine]
Reply to
Whodunnit
One more thing, I think it is best to spread an EVEN layer of the latex adhesive with a putty knife, covering the entire surface with no gaps. This will also help with sound deadening, as the latex dries flexible. Some people like to also remove the screws after the glue sets but I never do. I don't know, I guess I am fearful of the homasote seperating without the screws there but this is probably just paranoid speculation on my part.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
```````` Around these parts we just spread some white glue on the plywood and screw down the Homasote on eye-balled, 12 inch spacing. After it dries you could take up the screws and re-use them somewhere else, but no one ever seems to. Seems to work great with no complaints. BTW, you can buy the white glue in gallon containers. I got one for free at the time and that's another reason I used it!
Best,
Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" In Illinois...
Reply to
Paul K - The CB&Q Guy
Thanks to all for the tips.
Kevin (and Duncan)
Reply to
Kevin
One more thing: The Homasote should be sealed after installation with a water based primer (basic latex paint will also do), edges too, so it won't absorb too much water while doing scenery. Some use shellac mixed with mineral spirits but the fumes from this rule it out for me.
-John
Reply to
Pacific95
The "superior tackability" sounds great, but how about the sawdust problem? Have you cut any of it (I'm thinking about the possibility of ripping the 3/8 into roadbed on a 30 degree angle, ripping those in half lengthwise, and possibly also of putting partial angles cross cuts in it - very much like Homabed. But it sounds like a professional level dust collection and exhaust filtration system would be required.
Reply to
Steve Caple
```````` Noooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!! Urban legend!!!!
Paul - "The CB&Q Guy" In Illinois
Reply to
Paul K - The CB&Q Guy
Chief:
You wrote:"...Some use shellac mixed with mineral spirits..."
I used to use a lot of shellac for wood finishing; in fact I have almost a pint of it in a spilled and hardened puddle that glues the food freezer to the cellar floor. If you want to thin shellac, it seems to me that denatured alcohol would be the thing to use, since that is the solvent the stuff is already mixed with. I like shellac fumes; they have a nice old-timey smell. But then hydrocarbons always seem to bring back pleasant memories for me; Using methyl ethyl ketone or mixing up polyester resin that exudes vapors of styrene monomer you get when mixing up polyester resin reminds me of my auto-body days, naphtha and degreaser remind me of the motor-repair shop. I wasn't at either of those places very long, but I had fun.
Incidentally, the model-building press worries way too much about solvents. Yes, you should use common sense, but don't go overboard. If you are putting lots of vapor into the air in an enclosed place, as when spray painting a 1:1 car, yes you should wear a mask, but if you are just painting a Tyco boxcar orange with a spray bomb it is perfectly all right to do it on the back porch or fire escape with a cardboard box to contain the overspray and preserve the porch's paint and good domestic relations. Then again, common sense can't be bought in a box and buckled on.
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Reply to
Gerard Pawlowski
Chief, My late neighbor Paul Bannon cobbled up his own central dust collection system in his basement. It was amazing, but then so was his vertical mill (converted from a drill press), his metal lathe (modified greatly from a small wood lathe), the extra pipes and blowers he had added to his furnace ducts to even out heat distribution, the tags and labels on every wire, junction, and pipe, and the industrial pale green paint on his cellar walls. Anyway, I don't know what this mineral board is made from; if it's some kind of pressed fiberglass or mineral wool you could saw it with a handsaw and avoid the dust problem.
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Reply to
Gerard Pawlowski
Start here:
"
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" in one of the pages they talk about hand tools but, if you use powertools have good ventilationa nd dust removal. It's their product, they should know.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Newhouse
Shellac and mineral spirits ????? The thinner for shellac is alcohol :-). But the fumes are still pretty strong.
Just saw something in an old MR where the manufacturer claimed Homasote was sealed when made so it wouldn't absorb water while outdoors at a construction site. I don't know if that's still true or not.
Reply to
Larry Blanchard
I read that, and since hand ripping strips out of it with a 30 degree beveled side would be boh arduous and lacking in precision, power tools seem to be required, but my shop vac would not stop fine particles and those are just what I worry about getting in my lungs. Now, a HEPA shop vac might do the job, but I'd hate to guess the price.
Does anyone have any experience of reasonably priced high filtration dust collection sysems?
Reply to
Steve Caple
I have seen descriptions of pre-filters for a shop vac built from a small drum/barrel and some bits of PVC pipe. Fill the drum partially with water (maybe 2/3?) and arrange the PVC pipe such that the air (and dust) is sucked through the water...ferinstance, I would make the inlet go near the bottom, and drilll lots of holes, maybe 3/8 in diameter, through the pipe near the bottom. This will allow for lots of airflow, but not tend to suck all the water out of the drum and into the vac...
I'm not having much luck Googling for a description of such a system...maybe I'll do some playing this weekend.
Jeff Sc. Cloud, Ga.
Don't bother to reply via email...I've been JoeJobbed.
Reply to
Jeff Sc.
You can make a pretty good water filter for a vacuum by using a five gallon paint can. These can be purchased new at many places such as Home Depot, Lowes, Menards, etc. You need to put the inlet pipe in through the top and have it extend to almost the bottom of the can. leave about two inches of clearance so stuff can get clear of the tube without stopping it up. Drill multiple small holes in the inlet pipe in the area of the bottom two inches to reduce the incoming air blast The outlet pipe needs to extend down about one-half inch below the top. fill the thing with about three gallons or ten liters of water and crimp the top down with the tabs built into it. You can use bulkhead fittings to pass the tubes through the lid. Bulkhead fittings are available at plumbing supply stores and marine stores.
Here is an expensive, commercial version of my home-made "rainbow" water filter.
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Reply to
Froggy
Thanks, guys.
Gee, ya think the sludge could be used to patch my driveway?
Reply to
Steve Caple
Dear folks:
This talk about Rainbow vacuum cleaners reminds me of a Kirby salesman I used to know. He said the Kirby people told him that Rainbow cleaners "smelled like farting in a bathtub" (and I quote). So he went home and "farted in a bathtub, and heck! they were right!" Now there's a salesman for you.
Cordially yours, Gerard P.
Reply to
Gerard Pawlowski
When I was in high school, the word for the sound of a fart in a (preferably porcelanized iron, for the appropriate resonance) bathtub was "bork!".
Now you now why that Supreme Court candidate never had a chance. His pronounced right wing paper trail and kooky crew cut were minor factors.
I have no explanation for the recent popularity of a certain Scandinavian musical entertainer, unless it's the amusement factor inherent in her name. No other factors seem to account for it.
Reply to
Steve Caple

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