Model Railroading: If you had it to do over..

wrote:


I didn't mention brass because I don't feel that brass is suitable for a beginner. It is too finicky and in many ways too delicate for a novice to use. Most older brass does not run very well and needs a great deal of work. Also the era that was mentioned has a limited amount of brass available.
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Frank Rosenbaum
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wrote:

Um, I never had any problems that way. My first HO loco was a Varney Dockside -which ran reliably- and my second was an early PFM flywheel 2-trucked Shay -which *still* runs reliably after over half a century.

That has not been my experience. In fact, the older Japanese brass tends to run better, longer, and more reliably than the modern Korean stuff -which has much more detail but commonly lacks power train reliability. (The little bits also tend to fall off of Korean brass when looked at too hard: the soldering work is far below early Japanese standards.)

There is a limited amount of rolling stock of *any* kind for the pre-1900 era.
~Pete
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If I were to do it all over?
If I didn't have so much invested in decorated and kitbashed GER locomotives and rolling stock, which makes them far less tradable on places like eBay, then I'd start again with On30. A freelanced line, on Vancouver Island, replacing the standard gauge CPR subsidiary, Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway.
In fact, I'd call the railway the E&N and use available E&N decals and place the railway in the late 1950s era so I could still run steam. I'd even consider using standard gauge freight cars that have been retrucked for use on the narrow gauge, rather like they did on the Newfoundland Railway.
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Merry Christmas
Roger Traviss
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OK, but Varney isn't brass. Great on the shay. How many years had you been in the hobby before you bought your first brass?

Agreed with most Korean, but I found that Samhongsa was a good builder. My experience has been different.

True, but with the Bachmann rolling stock there is more choice and it is all assembled.
Again, we are advising a beginner with what to buy, and I believe that, if he goes with the chosen era, he will be best served with On30.

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Frank Rosenbaum
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wrote:

Um, yes, I know. That's what we call a "comparison".
Included to demonstrate that brass can run just as well -if not better- than non-brass.
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On Thu, 09 Dec 2010 19:10:14 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@now.net wrote:

Thanks again for your input. I'm thinking Shay (N) is the way to go. I found this link you folks might find interesting if you haven't seen it yet. http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/Page0002.Html
You might click around a bit, there's plenty of steam era modeling ideas.
Thanks,
Dave
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On Thu, 09 Dec 2010 19:10:14 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@now.net wrote:
Thanks to all for sharing your insights. I took the plunge and scrapped my N project and went with ON30. Starting out with a Bachmann Shay and hoping to hand lay my own track.I heard the Bachmanns have a gear problem so I will change those with a retro fit. I am trying to learn more about rail code for ON30. Any thoughts are appreciated.
Dave
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On 18/12/2010 6:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@now.net wrote:

Micro Engineering make an excellent On30 flex track, nicely sized ties, properly spaced. http://microengineering.com/products_ft.htm
You can hand-lay turnouts fairly easily, but Micro-engineering makea good line of those as well: http://microengineering.com/products_to.htm
There are a few other mfrs of On30 track. Google is your friend.
Code 100 rail scales out to about 70lb rail in O, which is a OK for "heavy duty" narrow gauge. Code 83 --> about 55lb rail, just right for most narrow gauge. Code 70 --> about 30 lb rail, OK for light duty narrow gauge. Code 55 --> about 20lb rail, very light, used mostly in mines and in-plant industrial narrow gauge.
HTH Wolf K.
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wrote:

Dave, for mainline track, I would use code 100. for all other track, I would use code 83. Code 100 in HO would be very heavy rail, and code 83 would be typical. I am using 83 for my mainline and 70 for everything else. I can't give you weight/yard for O scale because I don't know it.
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Frank Rosenbaum
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