Module Standards for HO scale, re: T-nuts

Froggy@The wrote:
>>> I want to know what is going to happen to all the big electric >>> locos now that electrification is a goner. Surely some of them
>>> are going to be stored and/or saved? I don't suppose it's >>> possible to ever run them again, but it sure would be nice to >>> keep a couple of them around >> >> Froggy, are you referring to the electric locos here in NSW? A few >> examples of both 46 and 86 class locos have been preserved in >> running order, and are available for use within the CityRail >> electrified network. The remainder are apparently stored at Broken >> Hill if my sources are correct. >> > Ya, I know that a few are at Broken Hill, but what of the 85s. What > a GREAT machine. Pity to see them lost as were some of our finer > efforts. I would really like to have a model of an 85, several of > them actually to make a two or three unit consist.
They have been moved from storage at Lithgow loco, now closed, so I assume that they too have gone to BH. I can find out easily enough.
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says...

You mean religion is OK??
Just kidding, just kidding :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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The 'Connie" was a pretty thing, compared to it's mostly bulbous or lumpy competitors at the time. We had a restored one fly into Flint a couple years ago, all done up in the USAF 'MATS' scheme of silver, blue and yellow. Just beautiful!
Dan Mitchell ========= Steve Magee wrote:

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Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:

We've got one here in Sacramento at the McClellan Aviation Museum - but it's an EC-121 (with the radomes). I'll never forget flopping along at 2500 feet in an H-3 and seeing a Connie on SAM patrol (call sign "Tasty Nostril") cruising along below us, leaving four distinct prop wakes on the water.
--
Steve Caple

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Lockheed L-1049-G in Eastern Airlines "Golden Falcon" livery: arguably the most beautiful airplane ever.
National Airlines L-1049-H delivery livery was but a half-step behind the Golden Falcon.
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They have an EC-121 at the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, FLA, too. I'm glad a couple got saved, but the EC-121 'conversion' package ('potbelly' and dorsal fin) sure didn't do much for the Connie's basic good looks!
I think there are only a couple real 'Connies' (unmodified) still flying.
There was an interesting program on one of the TV documentary channels (History?) a few weeks ago on a bunch of Australian aircraft buffs that found a Connie in a boneyard here in the USA, restored it, and flew it back to Australia. Good Show! I'm not really 'into' aircraft all that much, but appreciate the work and dedication that goes into such a project.
My own historical restoration efforts consist of volunteer work on the local 3' gauge steam railroad (Huckleberry RR), and assisting in the restoration of an M-18 'Hellcat' tank destroyer for the local Buick museum. The M-18s were all built by Buick. We have our M-18 running, and looking good, but there are LOTS of less obvious things to attend to yet ... probably another years worth ... like literally hundreds of track-link joints to 'rebush'. Whee!.
Dan Mitchell ========= Steve Caple wrote:

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On Tue, 06 Apr 2004 10:00:49 -0400, "Daniel A. Mitchell"
Had one visit our local air show several years ago...nice and shiny!
Don't bother to reply via email...I've been JoeJobbed.
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Perhaps a fellow Aussie here (Mark?) can comment, but I seem to remember a restored Super Connie, in full Qantas paint, flying back into Oz in the last few years. There is this reference:
http://www.antique-aeroplane.com.au/_forum/00000006.htm
which refers to it being stored. Albion Park is just south of Sydney, or about 200k south of me here in Newcastle. Would love a good photo of a Qantas Super Connie as my wallpaper. Make a change from (alternating) XP Blue or something train-ish!
Steve
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wrote:

Yep. I saw it a year or two ago when it was in Hobart for a few days. If I can find the photos easily I'll post them somewhere.
Regards,
Stuart
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It says that the flying machine was "rescued" from America, but it doesn't say whether it was North or South America, nor which American country the thing was in. The continents of America make a big place. There are lots of airplanes sitting around in South America because they can't fly anymore and there is no facility for scrapping them, so they just sit for decades. In many cases it is possible to restore them to flying status -- IF-- you have enough money. North America seems to me to be a wasteland for restorable aircraft as most have been either restored or scrapped.
Are there any serviceable Lockheed Electras in Oz? Are any still flying? I avearge seeing one here in Georgia about once every four or five years. Saw one at Atlanta airport last fall (spring down-under)
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Froggy@The wrote:
> It says that the flying machine was "rescued" from America, but it > doesn't say whether it was North or South America, nor which American > country the thing was in.
It was retrieved from the aircraft boneyard at Davis-Monthan in Arizona.
http://www.hars.org.au/fleet/constellation /
> Are there any serviceable Lockheed Electras in Oz?
Not that I'm aware of, unless you count the RAAF's Orions! :-)
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wrote:

Mark, thanks for that. An interesting site, one I will explore and keep as a favourite. Now, if they can just get the photo album of the Connie up... :)
Steve
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A simple sheet metal 'retainer' cover plate can be placed over the T-nut to hold it in place. A large 'Fender Washer' with a couple mounting holes drilled into it will work.
But a threaded insert is a better solution, and hardly any more work.
Dan Mitchell ========= "Stuart D." wrote:

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Think about it. It is actually less work. Drill Screw Through (finished, done, d'ende, fini, voila, final)
Not subject to swelling and shrinking of the wood, immune to rough handling, won't shake or wobble loose and precision hole size not important, anything "close" will do OK.
Not that I'd EVER suggest that "close" was good enough, one should always use the correct drill, but you know what I mean.
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Froggy@The says...

Agreed. That said, I've never heard of one falling out under any condition other than a loose fit or being pulled by the bolt. And a little epoxy goes a long way :-).
But as a woodworker I heartily endorse the use of threaded inserts (or barrel bolts) instead.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Oops, barrel bolts and threaded inserts are not the same thing
This is a barrel bolt
http://www.austinhardware.com/dept.asp?dept_id 3
This is a threaded insert:
http://www.ezlok.com/frameset.html?http://www.ezlok.com/hex.htm
Actually there are many different kinds of threaded inserts, but this is like the ones I use. Some are hex-drive and some are installed with a screwdriver.
There are also barrel nuts, which is what I think Larry meant to type, but they are very similar to T-nuts and are used much the same way
This is a barrel nut
http://www.shipstore.com/ss/html/BEC/BECBB2500125.html
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Froggy@The says...

Actually, what I was talking about was a cross dowel. See:
http://www.woodpeck.com/crossdowels.html
For some reason, I've always called those barrel bolts :-).
BYW, there are also T-nuts with wings that have screw holes in them to keep them from pulling out.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Yeah, those would work, although you'd have to drill two holes instead of one and they'd get loose and wobbly after a very short time when being used to hold the adjustable feet. Getting them to work just right would mean very tight control of hole diameter and position.

Easy to see why. No doubt there are many who do likewise.

Quite true. A function of the never-ending quest to build a better, less expensive mouse trap.
Ah, but the threaded insert is still the king of the hill as it requires only one hole be drilled, which hole does not require precise sizing or positioning, AND it requires no auxiliary support devices, glues, screws or mechanisms to ensure its reliability; PLUS it cannot come loose, get stripped, wobble, get misaligned or be misplaced.
It is as perfect a solution to the adjustable table height function as the cutting off of the glad hand is to the pesky magnetic coupler issue.
.............F> VBG, GA
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Froggy@The says...

Again, I agree that the threaded insert is best. I've used them in woodworking jigs for years.
But I've also seen one lock to the inserted bolt and come out with it :-). What happens is if you tighten a bolt too much, it compresses the wood threads which loosens the insert. And "too much" depends on the type of wood.
But that should not be a concern in the application we're talking about.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Which brings us full circle. :-) Those who wish to be engineering purists are obligated to use actual leg adjusters, rather than *any* of the makeshift solutions that have been proposed, including inserts. But that's not necessary.
Even tee nuts are a perfectly good solution, provided that a long-enough bolt is used that it extends up into a close fitting hole so that its upper end helps bear radial loads. The tee nut is engineered to work in compression, relative to its direction of installation, and that's exactly what it's doing in this case.
An installation where the tee-nut can be pried out when the table is shoved sideways is simply a bad implementation. An installation in which the tee-nut can't get twisted out by radial loads is just fine. It requires the drilling of two (stepped) holes, but turns a mis-implementation into a satisfactory one.
A little adhesive (e.g., epoxy) can be used at the leg/tee nut interface by those concerned about retention.
--
John Miller
Email address: domain, n4vu.com; username, jsm
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