Re: Ebay lawsuit

On 23 Jun 2003 21:34:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (EppersonJohnR) wrote:


Hmmmm, Are your eyes open? Lets change the books to hide monies paid to the exec's and not tell the stockholders about it. Lets create a fake shortage of electricity and bill them for it. How about crappy software that the world is forced to u$e? Companies and Corporations have done more stuff that is not legal than people. Government just passes 'laws' then do what they wish. Money involved? Hmmmmm.
And of course my favorite unknown:
How about viruses? Could it be like the radar gun/radar detector? In the case of radar, both are made by the same company and is an upward spiral in modifications making each better than the last.
tod
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On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 18:25:00 -0700, FlameTester

So, what company is it that makes both a radar and radar detector?
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Raytheon, for one, but they're for military aircraft, not cars...unless you want to know if an enemy missile has a radar lock on your car.
Actually, launching chaff from your car to confuse cops may be a pretty cool thing to have...
--Dan
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<dan[at]ferrarishields.com> wrote:>> So, what company is it that makes both a radar and

An urban legend here in Dayton has a tech sgt working on avionics of one of the EF-111 Raven Electronic Warfare aircraft at Wright Patterson AFB. There was a Fairborn cop sitting on 235 (which passes across the north end of the runway...) clocking speeders. When the tech fired up the aircraft electronics to test, he got a "threat" warning, so he reached over in the cockpit and flipped on the jammer system...
The cop supposedly bailed out of his cruiser as it filled with smoke!
Now THAT'S countermeasures.
--
Joe Ellis € The Synthetic Filker TesserAct Studios
Please Note: ALL email from hotmail.com is deleted UNREAD
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On 7/11/03 12:15 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, "Jon

When I was in the Army, at one time I advised a Texas National Guard Infantry battalion. Their local training area was about a mile off I-40 east of Amarillo. Every time the Combat Support Company Ground Surveillance Radar (GSR) guys lit up, you could hear the semis slam on the brakes!
I happen to know they used to do it for fun, too.
Brian
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wrote:

    I knew an ECM tech who built an ECM unit for his car. He took a radar detector and, instead of sounding a tone, it triggered a microwave magnetron mounted behind the grille. The pulse took down the radars on police vehicles instantly. Eventually word got around and now ECM is illegal in my old state (and several others)
                                cat
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cat wrote:

I remember reading a "how-to" article on this several years ago in an automotive magazine. They basically had instructions on how to connect a variable oscillator circuit to a magnetron so you could dial up whatever speed you wanted the cop's radar to display. The theory was that the magnetron's signal was powerful enough to override the traffic radar's front end and therefore inject the oscillator's signal into the speed computing circuits. Worked pretty well according to the article.
Steve
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I do know that years ago (probably 20+) there was an outfit in Oregon that would sell a modified radar detector. It had dial a speed and random settings on it. There was a special way they sold it so as not to draw the attention of the FCC but I kept the magazine advertisement for years. Cost was expensive, $400 or so that many years ago. I suspect only Ferrari drivers bought it.
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On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:30:18 GMT, Steve Martinak <"mart832 -a"@t- ameritech.net> wrote :>cat wrote:

Who needs all this "technology" ??
I knew a couple commercial drivers who had radar detectors, and on the dash, a TUNING FORK!! Detector would chirp, they'd hit the fork on something and "supposedly" it sent a signal to the police radar showing they were within speed limits.
Personally, I thought it was a bunch of hogwash....anyone know if such a thing would work?
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On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 23:21:34 GMT, Steve Hoskins

    Theoretically an acoustic signature of the right frequency at sufficient amplitude could mask a moving object and give a false return. Now the real world part is you would need more amplitude than a heavy metal band to even m,ask a small vehicle, let alone a truck. A signature loud enough to mask a semi would be rather noticeable to the police, especially after it blew out every window for a mile around. I suspect those drivers were just having one over on you.
                                cat
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That's what I thought....especially when the tuning forks were tiny ones at that.....just gives more credence to the real fact that these drivers were bullshit artists.
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2003 12:19:28 GMT, Steve Hoskins

The guys I knew who had radar detectors were also always teetering on the brink of a suspension in terms of points... the radar detectors sure didn't keep them from getting tickets, but maybe it cut the number in half - who knows.
Andy ----------------------------------------------------------- http://www.duckcreek.org - Pre-Interstate Urban Archaeology -----------------------------------------------------------
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 03:51:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@notmail.com (Andy Harman) wrote :

I'll be honest, I used to drive tour/charter buses out of Washington, DC -- we allused to have detectors in the buses. My record was clean. The detector did help somewhat.....
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Um, No...
You can yell into your satellite dish all day long, but you'll never hear it coming out of your television set.
Radar is radio waves, which are electromagnetic, and extremely high frequency (microwave). Sound waves are not electromagnetic, and no radio antenna in the universe is going to pick them up.
--Dan
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2003 16:50:26 -0700, "Dan O'Connor" <dan[at]ferrarishields.com> wrote:>> Theoretically an acoustic signature of the right

    Not an accurate analogy.

    Acoustic waves are made of air and that involves compression. If air is sufficiently compressed it WILL mask an object. Research on this was carried out by the Army and Navy and they found it did work but had problems with scalability. It took more power and equipment to mask something like a vehicle than was practical (the support gear had a larger signature than the item they were trying to mask) so the research was abandoned. However the research proved the theory. It simply did not return a practical device. Note I said "Theoretically", not practically.     BTW: that research may have failed but it lead to information which is in use in the current stealth craft, research which had to do with how and where air went into compression and how it affects the radar signature of an object.
                                cat     
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Raytheon, for one, but they're for military aircraft, not cars...unless you want to know if an enemy missile has a radar lock on your car.
Actually, launching chaff from your car to confuse cops may be a pretty cool thing to have...
--Dan
That's why there are laws against throwing your trash out of the window of your car! : )
dlm
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Chaff is pretty ineffective. Steelbelted radials and your radiator are the most reflective surfaces for police band radar units. Tilt your radiator back 45 degrees vertically then rotate it 45 degrees right, or left, with relation to the centerline of the cars direction of travel. With polybelts you have pretty well stealthified your vehicle.
Put aluminum foil inside your polybelt tires but, only half way around. The tires are almost guaranteed to be out of phase, that and the occillating "blinking" action as you approach the radar unit used to really drive them buggy. It's an old trick so they may have some countermeasures for it by now.
Good luck, Paul

--
Working the Rockie Road of the G&PX

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There's a similar e-mail scam titled "Important Information Regarding Your Paypal Account" that's asking for information (Email Address, Credit Card number and expiration, ATM PIN), supposedly from " snipped-for-privacy@paypal.com" (the copy I got this morning was actually from snipped-for-privacy@itcom.it).
PLEASE don't be foolish enough to fall for it.
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--------------080105080001050009050401 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
I fell for this Scam awhile ago. Right after I sent the e-mail I felt uncomfortable and contacted E-bay security via e-mail. They go back to me very quickly and suggested I change all my passwords which I have done.
I was reminded by E-bay that they will never ask for password verification in an e-mail.
Tom

--------------080105080001050009050401 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title> </head> <body> I fell for this Scam awhile ago. Right after I sent the e-mail I felt uncomfortable and contacted E-bay security via e-mail. They go back to me very quickly and suggested I change all my passwords which I have done.<br> <br> I was reminded by E-bay that they will never ask for password verification in an e-mail.<br> <br> Tom<br> <br> <blockquote type="cite" cite=" snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com"> <pre wrap=""><!----> There's a similar e-mail scam titled "Important Information Regarding Your Paypal Account" that's asking for information (Email Address, Credit Card number and expiration, ATM PIN), supposedly from <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@paypal.com">" snipped-for-privacy@paypal.com"</a> (the copy I got this morning was actually from <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@itcom.it"> snipped-for-privacy@itcom.it</a>).
PLEASE don't be foolish enough to fall for it. </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>
--------------080105080001050009050401--
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