Merlin on e-bay

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A bit pricey at nearly £50k, but there, new ones are uncommon fifty years
after the end of production.
Wonder who'll end up with it?
regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
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Presumably whoever does buy it will have to spend the same sort of money again getting it zero timed, it cannot fly as it is without a CofA.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@prepair.co.uk
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
We locate the odd bearing for vintage aircraft restorers, many of which are old surplus stock well out of grease life and with no paperwork. I'm told these can be accepted as the aircraft are operated under a CAA 'permit to fly' rather than full certificate of airworthiness. I presume this arrangement would equally relax the requirements for an engine. I still don't imagine it would be a trivial or inexpensive matter to recommission such a thing, but perhaps not quite as daunting as it might first appear.
BTW. I believe the Merlin 134 is a bit specialised being fitted only to D-H Sea Hornet - don't know if it's the left or right hand rotation one though.
NHH
Reply to
Nick H
Turning to "British Piston Aero-engines and Their Aircraft" (Alec Lumsden, Airlife Publishing, 1994) it seems the mark 134 was the RH rotation version. It was manufactured c.1950 specifically for the Hornet/ Sea Hornet. The 130-135 series Merlins for the Hornet had a variety of differences from the usual Merlins such as reversed coolant flow, down-draught air intake and a more streamlined profile. I wonder what "Brand new condition" actually means. The engine in the photographs seems to be partly dismantled. Regards Peter
Reply to
Peter J Seymour
I reckon he's found it in a crate & took the lids off for a looksee before actually believing his good fortune! I'd have thought the BoB F would have grabbed it if it could be flown in one of their aircraft.
regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
The 'permit to fly' scheme is administered by the Popular Flying Association. (now called the Light Aircraft Association) I was one of their inspectors a few years ago.
P to F aircraft eligibility was controlled and mainly concerned homebuilt aircraft, limitations on weight and engine power also apply, it was about 200BHP IIRC - clearly a Merlin wouldn't qualify! The warbirds come under the wing of the CAA and 'special category' certificates of airworthiness.
One of the problems associated with an engine like this on the e-bay could be a lack paperwork for traceability of components - it could prove very troublesome convincing the CAA that the engine is fit for flight, even after rebuild.
I suspect it'll end up in a tractor pull machine :-(
Julian.
Reply to
Julian
It was up there a week ago, same price, and didn't sell.
The bloke down past Weston way has shedfuls of the things. Merlins aren't that uncommon. AFAIK, this is 20k of engine tops, as it's in need of overhaul and isn't a popular mark. Amongst the three or four racing warbird engine shops in Leftpondia, there's still a good trade in the things.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Kim,
The ironic thing about B o B Merlin engines is that they are rebuilt and serviced in America but the last flying Me 109G Daimler Benz engine was rebuilt by Rolls Royce.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman

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