OT? - Rotovating

We've a lot of very poor land at our permanent site. Coppiced heathland &
recently commercial forestry, we have removed most of the Corsican pine &
needle drop & the heath is quickly recovering.
We discovered a B&S powered rotovator on Freecycle & after finding it a bit
of petrol pipe were delighted to find that it started & ran just fine in its
jerky clutchless fashion. It didn't dig very well though & we all had a go
at punishing our shoulders until someone noticed the blades were on
backwards!
It was quite a better digger after that & we churned up a plot, digging in
several bags of cow poo. It will be a vegetable garden as soon as we can
figure out a way of keeping the rabbits away, bearing in mind that we are
only there for two days in every month. Anyone got any bright ideas about
natural rabbit putter-offers?
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
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1080!!
Reply to
Scenic
Cats
Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
Wire netting works but is very modern so may not suit. Also you must bury it a foot into the ground to stop them burrowing under it. Did the ancients not have an answer or did they just eat the rabbits with the vegetables? I'm surprised at you Kim using a modern machine. Surely they weren't around when that type of building was erected. What's wrong with good old muscle? :-)
John
Reply to
John
I've just re-read this, realised that maybe cats aren't the real answer for your plot. They are what worked for us, after a maybe 3 years without cats we could grow nothing in the garden. Everything including young trees was being destroyed by rabbits, mice and voles. I tried fencing, the raybites always found some way in. Tried shooting them, got quite a few but they just bred more to replace those lost, the numbers never seemed to change. Eventually got a couple of cats again, they catch the occasional young rabbit & that seems to deter the rest quite effectively. Also they keep the numbers of rodents down very well.
Maybe your local zoo can supply you with poo from some fierce creature which would eat rabbits. Putting that sort of thing around the boundaries is alleged to work in some cases, might be worth asking them. Either that, or persuade a fox to live on site
Tim
Reply to
Tim Leech
"John" wrote (snip):-
ISTR rabbits didn't arrive in England until after the conquest (Norman that is) and throughout the middle ages were largely confined to manorial warrens carefully protected by a warrener. It's only more recently that the wild population exploded and they became considered pests.
Reply to
Nick H
Kim, Ferreting is a very affective way of keeping the rabbit poulation down although it wont completely stop them it's usually done between september and march when the rabbits are not breeding so much, although rabbits seem to breed all year round these days. Steve and I catch rabbits using ferrets, but your probably a bit far away for us you could try this site.
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Theres sure to be someone locally that will be more than happy to come and clear the warrens FOC. HTH Regards Gary
Reply to
gary millward
It is possible you just did an excellent job of propagating bind weed :-(
BugBear
Reply to
bugbear
Yes, but I'm sure Kim will make them wear appropriate horned helmets(sic) and pretend to be correctly in-period hares 8-)
(Although I think Romans might have brought rabbits first)
Reply to
Andy Dingley
"Andy Dingley" wrote :-
Sorry Andy, I forgot to raise the pedant flag ;-)
Reply to
Nick H
Since this thread is already OT - was that 'your lot' on Scrapheap Challenge last weekend Kim?
Reply to
Nick H
Yes, some of them.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn

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