Stationary Enigine Magazine.

Gentlemen,
Well first impressions and I'm impressed, the extra 16 pages have been
nicely filled I think.
Lets hope we all do our bit to keep it like it now is.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
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Agreed. Particularly enjoyed Petter assessment of JAP/Villier D270 - hope DWE has a few more of those up his sleeve.
NHH
Reply to
NHH
I wondered how he was going to use the space and the bigger, better resolution images are a good way to go.
I think the partsmart is daft - there is already a "parts for sale" thing in the class ads - don't get that at all.
Gathering the "facilities" into one place at the end of the mag might be a good idea - having them scattered about is a shrapnel approach.
Mostly though - a good improvement.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
kimsiddorn
kimsiddorn wrote (snip:
Should appeal more to the casual browser who might pick up a copy in Smiths so perhaps gain a little more circulation that way. However I don't think it will ever be as popular as the tractor, steam etc mags - seems to me that SEM's readership is largely restricted to engine *owners* whereas the others also attract enthusiasts who are happy just to visit, look and photgraph etc.
NHH
Reply to
NHH
I first encountered SEM when I bought my first engine a few years back, at which time it helped with sourcing and replacing parts, and making contacts. As a relatively new convert to the "dedicated scene" I subscribed, hoping to find it to be comparable to the classic car magazinesbut I find it rather dull reading, with the adverts being my primary target. I think that engines are much more specialist than classic cars and although my main vehicular interest is in vehicles of the Rootes group I found that reading restoration articles, etc. relating to other vehicles was still absorbing, but cannot say the same about SEM. Perhaps it is just that I have absorbed some 60 odd years of knowledge about cars, but am still at the bottom of the learning curve for stationary engines. Pete
Reply to
THE DOUGLAS STATIONARY ENGINE RESOURCE (admin)
I guess I could be called a classic car enthusiast though during my ownership of same (Imp sport followed by Clan Crusader) they were everyday transport. I used to to buy 'Classic and Sportscar' regularly with the odd copy of 'Practical Classics' thrown in for luck and I know what you mean Re. comparison with SEM for an absorbing read. My favourite articles were always road tests and anything 'technical' which gave an insight into how something was designed or built (I was also hooked on Haynes manuals for the same reason). I look for the same insight from SEM and it is sometimes there (Petter evaluation of Villiers D270 is a good example) but also enjoy articles about company history and particularly the genealogy, or perhaps phylogeny, of their various products. I'm hoping the extra pages mighr bring a little more depth to some of those.
NHH
Reply to
NHH
which time it helped with sourcing and replacing
scene" I subscribed, hoping to find it to be comparable
adverts being my primary target. I think that engines are
interest is in vehicles of the Rootes group I found that
absorbing, but cannot say the same about SEM. Perhaps it
am still at the bottom of the learning curve for
of same (Imp sport followed by Clan Crusader) they
with the odd copy of 'Practical Classics' thrown in
read. My favourite articles were always road tests and
built (I was also hooked on Haynes manuals for the
(Petter evaluation of Villiers D270 is a good
genealogy, or perhaps phylogeny, of their various
I have a large collection of early S.E. magazines from the earlier years but don't get enough new info from the current copies to justify a monthly copy. I was ruined in my early years in my expectations for magazines when on 14th April 1950 I bought issue one of the Eagle!! This masterpiece by Marcus Morris had a glorious two page exploded drawing of a Gas Turbine-Electric Locomotive in great detail. This and the subsequent copies all showing wonderful mechanical exploded drawings probably started my lifelong interest in the subject.
Reply to
Dave Croft
From your remarks Nick does that mean I'm wasting my time :-)) I also, as you are aware, run a classic car and take Practical Classics which I do find interesting to read as well but I'm finding with the car Mags the English is getting atrocious for instance "Resto" whets wrong with Restoration. I have enough bother trying to understand text speak from colleagues, my daughter and others let alone having to read it. I think that there is a fair mix of articles in SEM but agree there could be more of the technical stuff, but then that is down to the readers.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
campingstoveman wrote (snip):
All good stuff, but everyone has favorites! Any little quirks of Listers you could enlighten us on - particularly things which might have persisted over several 'generations' of engine designs?
NHH
Reply to
NHH
Statement of the bleedin' obvious - a stationary engine is somewhat more simple than a car! ;o))
Seen inside one antique one lunger built for lasting delivery of a small amount of power and you've seen inside 'em all! I'm sure this is why I like the complex APU's etc.
I spent a few quality hours with my ABC's this afternoon (or, specially for Martin, "Thisarvo") . Fitted 16 3/16" nuts, flat washers and spring washers to hold down four coolant manifolds. Took me two hours. True, they were all spanner all the way down jobs, but even so. Talk about fiddly - well, hush my mouth!.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
kimsiddorn
Statement of the bleedin' obvious - a stationary engine is somewhat more simple than a car! ;o))
Kim,
I disagree, unless the car was built from the 80s to the present, my cars engine is fundamentally eight stationary engines using a common crank and being fed by two carburettors, no electricary, no computers and an ignition system of a slightly different design but more akin to a magneto than it appears.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
An obvious improvement to the Stationary Engine magazine would be if it was published by a Stationary Engine enthusiast,( like it used to be), and not a businessman.
Reply to
Charles Hamilton
I suggest that you are being a tad naive there Charles. An enthusiast would have canned it long since if only to stop the constant whine that enthusiasts emit.
ttfn Roland
Reply to
Roland Craven
Hmm, having met and corresponded with "the businessman" a fair bit over the last few years I think you are verging on offensive with that one.
We have found him supportive to the museum and enthusiastic about the hobby - not quite sure what else you would want.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Evans
Paul,
I don't think Charles is intending to be offensive just making an obvious point, you know the Editor better than most but the average reader would see him as a Business man because of what he does, publish various specialist magazines which at the end of the day for Kelsey Publishing has to make money. I also agree with Roland's point about an enthusiast running it, all Kelsey publishing have to do is produce the magazine and take a back seat when it comes to the inevitable politics that arise from the those that actually write the pieces, us.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
In which case I apologise Charles :-)
The way I read it was that his departure would benefit the mag which seemed rather harsh!
Paul
Reply to
Paul Evans
Businessman he may be - so am I! - but that doesn't stop him being an enthusiast. His replies to my questions, his treatment of the stuff I write, the constant attention to the magazine all say to me that this is one committed individual and we would all be the worse for his absence.
Long may he continue!
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
kimsiddorn

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