Do you remember when.......

Sitting the other day on the train on the way home from work I was
contemplating the fact that I have now been modelling for close on 37 years.
This got me thinking about how very much the modelling world has changed
over the years and how it was like when I was a teenager just contemplating
my first purchase. So I thought I'd start a thread on what those of us who
are old enough remember from the 1970's.
So, do you remember when.....
There was a magazine called Model Railway Constructor.
A Peco point cost £1.
There were no curved points, slips or code 75 points manufactured by Peco.
Railway Modeller was not an A4 sized magazine.
Triang Hornby made a "kit" of Princess Elizabeth in maroon livery where all
you really had to do was screw the loco and tender bodies to their
respective ready to run chassis and it was complete.
You tried to build an N gauge layout to a Cyril Freezer plan and it wouldn't
fit the board.
You went to an exhibition and a man called Slater showed you what Plasticard
was.
You discovered plastic kits could be assembled with something called Mek-Pak
and you didn't need that messy Airfix cement any more.
You didn't realise how quickly Mek-Pak evaporated till you left the bottle
open while you made a cuppa.
Flock powder only came in two shades of green.
Controllers all had resistance mats.
and finally...there was no such thing as DCC.
I just bought an ECOS colour display DCC controller at almost £600. Has to
be the best DCC purchase I have ever made. It is superb.
Why not add your memories to the thread and tell us about your most modern
purchase/acquisition to date?
Archie
Reply to
Manxcat
Loading thread data ...
I remember my first train set - 1946. Sigh ...
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
- Tension lock couplings were all the same size, shape and height as each other. - There was a magazine called Model Railway News. - You could get loco wheels from Romford and Hamblings. - You could get coach and wagon wheels by Jackson and...er... - Astrac was the control system of the future. - Ready to run locos were available in one livery - only. - You could buy new H&M point motors. - You could buy Peco Wonderful coal, mineral and salt wagons. - Railway Modeller cost 2/6. - Every town or suburb had a model shop. - There was an Easter exhibition every year at Central Hall. - You had to cut etched name and number plates to shape yourself.
Reply to
John Nuttall
And how many will be honest enough to say that they still have kits/projects started in that era but whose metamorphism into models/layouts dreamt through teenage eyes is unlikely ever to happen,The disruption of the grand plan caused by Girls ,marriage, career,house moves ,financial crisis and all the other things that life throws at people.
G.Harman
Reply to
damduck-egg
If you buy Kings Cross plates you still have to do that!
Reply to
Paul Boyd
I know - back in the 60s they were the only ones you could get! I still have some in the spares box but they are unlikely to see the light of day.
Reply to
John Nuttall
They've been around for that long? They must count as one of the longest standing brands still around, surely!
Reply to
Paul Boyd
I got a copy of the 1954/55 Gem cataloge today.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
The message from "Lobby Dosser" contains these words:
AoL. Dad brought it back from Belgium when the war ended... O gauge tinplate, 3-rail "oval", a very modern looking EMU with interior lighting, white light at the front, red at the rear. 20 volt supply (the controller ran my Meccano motors long after the train had died) which gave one of my Dad's mates a shock when he used his tongue* to check if the controller was working after the train stalled... When it worked it looked fantastic to my young eyes.
[*
using the tongue to short out the terminals was a standard method of checking to see if a bike lamp battery was still working]
Reply to
David Jackson
Remember when if the RTR model wasn't exactly what you wanted, you'd repaint/detail/convert it into whatever you wanted [1], rather than complain that the manufacturer got it wrong/wait for the manufacturer to produce what you want.
[1] e.g. convert a (diesel) class 37 into a 23 and mount it on a modified 29 chassis. Someone from De Haviland club used to do regular Railway Modeller articles about these sort of conversions.
PhilD
Reply to
PhilD
Those bike lamps were heavy. Must have been the equivalent of 4 D cells. I was using the same style lamp as late as 1958. Seems like I had something smaller when I cycled through Ireland in 1963.
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
Postal problems?
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
Railway Modeller articles about these sort of conversions.
Monty Wells, 'though more detailing jobs than conversions.
Reply to
Tinkerbell
Just hadnt thought to order it - hadnt even thought till mid 1955.
Reply to
simon
Prices?
Reply to
Lobby Dosser
Graham Farish made far better OO points and track than Peco, in a better range and with live frogs? Ordinary points 10/6
Paul
Reply to
Paul Stevenson
[...]
Prices will look lower than they really are. In real terms (ie, the amount of time it takes to earn the moolah required to buy the model), today's prices are lower, and the product is better. Much better price/quality ratio.
Prices have risen approximately 40-fold since the late 1940s (house prices have risen more than that.) According to an advert reproduced in the The Hornby Companion, Vol 3, a goods train set (EDG7) cost 135/- in 1947, 6 pounds 15 shillings, or 6.75GBP. It comprised an 0-6-2T, two wagons, and a brake van. It's not clear whether that included track and a controller, although the ad states that "complete sets only will be sold for now." In today's money, that would be about 270 pounds....
cheers, wolf k.
Reply to
Wolf K
I remember assembling a vast rail line in the back garden using our uncles' clockwork Hornby train sets and track, along with the set of our friend across the street. The line was so long that most engines wouldn't traverse it on a single wind-up. Grandpa didn't mind until we decided that the flower bed, which was raised above the level of the lawn, would be ideal for building a cutting.
cheers, wolf k.
Reply to
Wolf K
Yep, there were 4 UK locos (presume OO) that could be bought complete or as diecast body with chassis kit and wheels/motor etc. Complete fully painted with X5 motor was GBP7 8s and 8p plus GBP1 6s and 4p postage. Catalogue 1s. Gem established in 1929 !
they even did track and points - perhaps theyre own !
Got catalogue for GBP1 along with some excellent photos of Claughtons in LNWR livery from GCR at Loughborough.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
plus presumably as this is a luxury niche market it wont necessarily follow the prices of a basket of required goods
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon

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