Hornby's Breakdown Crane origins???

Hi all
I have just completed weathering and detailing Hornby's Breakdown Crane in
yellow - I purchased this one in particular to go with my Pullman
coaches......not that it would accompany them, rather be a dedicated Pullman
Breakdown set in case anything happened to one of the Pullman Trains. It
came with late British Rail insignia which I replaced with a decal from a
sheet of Pullman livery I bought a while back. No doubt totally wrong when
compared to what "should've" been done but I'm not fussed.
This is my first foray into weathering and detailing since childhood and so
far, am very happy with the results - I know I can do better, especially
with some more detail parts etc and an airbrush instead of Humbrol's and
turps.
Have a look and feel free to comment
Anyway, to my point: What are the origins of the Breakdown Crane? Was it
modelled after a real prototype and if so do pictures exist somewhere. I
would love to learn more as I have another Crane I wish to detail and
weather (this one is in what appears to be such a deep green it appears
almost black).
Thanks folks
Steve
Reply to
mindesign
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BTW the problem of the tilting has been fixed with a plastic spacer ..... is definitely NOT a good look having the crane resting and the thing leaning forward!
Steve
Reply to
mindesign
Steve, Am not sure that the steam versions made it to yellow, I think all of the original "Cowan Sheldon 76 ton" (to answer your question) had been converted to diesel by then (The cab is extended and more round to the rear.)
The bad news is that the Jib runner is nothing like what the real thing is, but you have done a really great job and I'm not going to knock your efforts for Hornbys failings ! :-)
Have you thought about changing the chains and pulleys to something more prototypical ? There are some of these cranes still on the main and in preservation. The ELR and CVR have one, and I understand there may be one at The Railway Age\LNWR works at Crewe.
A great effort, well done.
Andy
Hi all
I have just completed weathering and detailing Hornby's Breakdown Crane in yellow - I purchased this one in particular to go with my Pullman coaches......not that it would accompany them, rather be a dedicated Pullman Breakdown set in case anything happened to one of the Pullman Trains. It came with late British Rail insignia which I replaced with a decal from a sheet of Pullman livery I bought a while back. No doubt totally wrong when compared to what "should've" been done but I'm not fussed.
This is my first foray into weathering and detailing since childhood and so far, am very happy with the results - I know I can do better, especially with some more detail parts etc and an airbrush instead of Humbrol's and turps.
Have a look and feel free to comment
Anyway, to my point: What are the origins of the Breakdown Crane? Was it modelled after a real prototype and if so do pictures exist somewhere. I would love to learn more as I have another Crane I wish to detail and weather (this one is in what appears to be such a deep green it appears almost black).
Thanks folks
Steve
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept." wrote
The last steam cranes I saw in operational condition in the early 1980s (Eastfield TMD) were still painted red. I too have no recollection of seeing *any* in yellow.
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John.
Reply to
John Turner
Thanks Andy
I have wanted to change them to something more like the originals but couldn't find anything. If they used cable, I would be OK though as I have some stuff that looks like heavy duty rusted cable.
Any ideas?
Further, I will make a things more prototypical if I can get decent pics.
best wishes
Steve
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept."
Reply to
mindesign
Also, I'd like to get rid of the god-awful finger knobs/wheels and at least replace them with spoked wheels.
BTW where did an operator sit?
Reply to
mindesign
The Hornby crane is 4 inches to short for scale, to save making a new mold for the match truck they used what was available. I aquired a set of drawings from Cowans Boyd for the 76t crane, with Roger Murray having a copy, and now Pete Waterman, I still have a copy in my 76t crane kit box (7mm). I will get round to scratch building a 4mm one which I intended in the first place. Good references are the Rialway accident books Jon Halls web site
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a nice book if you can get a copy Railway Steam Cranes by John S Brownlie, I picked mine up recently after a long search.
Ian Gearing
Reply to
Ian Gearing
mindesign wrote
Also, I'd like to get rid of the god-awful finger knobs/wheels and at least replace them with spoked wheels.
BTW where did an operator sit?
In a cab to the rear... See the picture at....
formatting link
You may just make out the two windows.?
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
After I presented the drawings to Pete Waterman at Railex, he informed me that he owns the crane that the drawings are from.
Ian
Reply to
Ian Gearing
brilliant Andy thanks .... see if you can get some of where the crew would go along with the pulley arrangements ....... I have decided to "archive" the crane I just finished, and go to town on my next one which is sitting waiting to be started, so all will come in handy. I also have the TICHY model from the US (American profile of course, but I don't mind that when it comes to industrial stuff) to do which will be an excellent model - pics available if anyone wants me to upload therm to my site just sing out
Thanks again
Steve
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept."
Reply to
mindesign
interesting, seeing as how there seems to be no windows on the Hornby at all - even in their latest offerings which is what I am using to "re" model. An odd omission considering there's room enough...... maybe I am missing something.
thanks again
Steve
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept."
Reply to
mindesign
The big open area is what became the cab on the diesel model. You probably needed the open space to let the heat out from having your back to the boiler. Mind you, I seem to remember a mate saying once the diesel engine was up to rpm it was still warm and stuffy in there. You may also need to extend to roof so it goes over the area where the drums etc are. It then rises with the "arm" that the lower pulleys sit on...
Sadly, the crane is back at Oakamoor, 1 1/2 miles south of where my DMU terminated today and as there is no vehicle access to the old quarry sidings where it is stored, I was a bit snookered!
I'll bear in mind and also see if I can dig out my pictures of the model I made which appeared in Model Rail a few years ago now.
Andy
interesting, seeing as how there seems to be no windows on the Hornby at all - even in their latest offerings which is what I am using to "re" model. An odd omission considering there's room enough...... maybe I am missing something.
thanks again
Steve
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept."
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
thanks heaps Andy ..... and I will continue researching
:)
Steve
"Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept."
Reply to
mindesign

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