Q1

The Tucano is powered by a Garrett Turboprop of about 1000 shp, so doesn't qualify as piston engined. And the C130 Hercules variants (C1, C3, C4 and C5) are powered by Rolls Royce Allison Turboprops so also fail to qualify. The Jetstream is also turboprop.
You could possibly consider the Slingsby T67 Firefly (flat four Lycoming piston engine) or the Grob Tutor.
Cheers Clive
Reply to
Clive Summerfield
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Corr! this has been some thread!
Just to say I am the proud owner of a Q1 now, I converted my duff 45xx into one at the local shop! The Q1 is fantastic and Hornby have really captured the essence of this revolutionary Southern work horse!
Reply to
Mike
Andrew Sollis CVMRD
All of the aircraft you mention have turboprops. That is, a gas turbine engine which drives an airscrew. The airscrew provides the thrust rather than the exhaust thrust of a turbojet or turbofan.
The vast majority of prop-driven aircraft these days have turboprops. There are fewer moving parts than in a piston engine and so they are more reliable and also far more fuel efficient.
-- Enzo
I wear the cheese. It does not wear me.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
David Jackson wrote in >Message-id:
Ah yes, I remember it now. My marooon, passed down from my uncle, maroon tinplate 0-4-0.
Unfortunately the brake system became a bit loose on mine. My grandad took it for repair to a Smithy in Crown St where it was delicately repaired with aid of 7lb lump hammer. It was never the same after.
Tommy
Reply to
Tommy
The message from snipped-for-privacy@aol.comeoffit (Tommy ) contains these words:
Ah! Right! A heavy repair.
Reply to
David Jackson
David Jackson
The technical term is "percussion adjustment" :-)
-- Enzo
I wear the cheese. It does not wear me.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
The message from "Enzo Matrix" contains these words:
I like that. But I like "heavy repair" better - a proper Crewe job... ;-)
Reply to
David Jackson
No, wartime Avengers were out of service by 1946 (last deployed with 828 sqd).
A new batch of TBM-3Es was then purchased from the US, which were developed roughly to TBM-3W standard (but with British equipment) as subhunters (hence "AS") a later variant was then developed, the AS5 which was again a US aircraft but with British developed equipment again roughly equating to the TBM-3S in effect the "killer" part of the team. It's easy to mistake them as AEW aircraft because of the large raydome they carried, this radar though was for looking for surfaced subs not for air defence.
In turn they were replaced by the first Gannets which were in service from 1955 onwards. These in turn acted in both the AS and AEW role.
FWIW the Avenger and Gannet are very similar visually.
Reply to
Chris Wilson

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