Totally OT - cameral advice



I have one of these and am very happy with it. As well as the two 'kit' lenses (the 18-70 is good for a kit lens, the 75-300 is excellent for its price if not particularly fast) I've got a lovely Minolta 50mm f1.7 (Apply a crop of 1.5 to all of the above, so equivalents are 27-105, 112-450, 75) Still looking out for something really wide but they tend to be expensive.
The anti-shake is good, but not as dramatically effective as it was on my Lumix FZ-10, where it was built into the lens directly. Then again, on the alpha it works on every lens ;)
A nice comfortable camera to use, if you leave it automatic it'll give you nice results and as you learn to drive it properly you'll start to feel it working with you to get excellent results. The 'look and feel' is virtually pure Minolta, so any experience you might have of their cameras will transfer across.
pete
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On Tue, Apr 10, 2007 at 12:06:57PM +0100, Lester Caine wrote:

Unless you want to blow your prints up to quite ridiculous sizes, there's no point spending money on vast numbers of pixels. With 6Mp you can comfortably do 14" wide prints. What matters far more is the quality of the glass you put in front of it, and the size of the hole that lets the light in. That's why my 6Mp D70 is infinitely superior to the 10Mp piece of shit in the latest chav accessory phone.
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Mike Hughes writes

Why not look at either Canon or Nikon bodies with a sigma lens for starters and then spend on better glass when you have a firmer idea later.
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dave hill

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The Canon system has autofocus. Do the Sigma lenses incorporate stuff that works with the Canon body? (Can't speak for the Nikon)
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Jane
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writes

Yes with both, SonyMinolta and Pentax and some For the 4/3 Olympus and of course Sigma
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Jane Sullivan wrote

Personally i haven't gone that way BUT yes a Sigma lens on a Cannon body will work BUT remember to get the correct fitting lens to match the Canon body. Also correct fit for the Sigma lens to Nikon body
I did look at getting a wide angle lens and was thinking sigma - a cost consideration- i have several Canon lenses already and the wide angle would have had limited usage.
Another thing to remember when buying Canon lenses. ALL EF style lenses fit all EOS cameras BUT the range EF-S lenses will only fit a limited digital camera range in the Canon stable.
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Can anybody tell me if my 4 old Canon FD series lenses can be used with any digital SLR ?
Dave W
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Yes, I can tell you, and the answer is "No".
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Thank you for that. It is the answer I half expected.
I can't bring myself to part with them for peanuts, but I doubt if they will ever be used again.
Another David W.
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DERWENT Re: Totally OT - cameral advice Tue, 10 Apr 2007 16:23:03 +0100, "David Westerman"

No, with one exception for a very esoteric lens which Canon produced a bespoke adaptor for.
PRAR
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Hi Mike, bottom end SLRs for you to choose from are the Sony alpha, Nikon D50 (very recently superseded I think by the D80), Canon EOS 400. Olympus have one as well. All have image stabilisation in the lenses except the Sony which has it built into the body. The advantage of body resident image stabilisation means any older lenses of the correct mount can be used. In Sony's case the alpha is a replacement of the Minolta Dynax 5D which it replaced when Sony took over Konica-Minolta's SLR operations.
Added to this there are some with large built in zoom lenses giving up to 12X optical magnification, a couple of which are the Panasonic Lumix FZ50 and the Canon IS3. These are considerably cheaper and you don't need to lug a variety of lenses round with you. Other advantage is they usually have a video mode The minus side is that their high ISO performance is a lot poorer than an equivalent SLR.
Jessops sell most of the range and warehouseexpress.com on the web seem to be one of the cheaper internet sites.
If you want to read a few reviews then go to www.dpreview.com/reviews . They review all new cameras from the cheaper point-and-press to the top end SLRs. It's an American site so some of the model numbers differ from European or UK ones but they usually mention the differences.
Hope this helps.
Phil
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"phil_ashton wrote

Actually dpreview IS NOT an American web site, just that a lot of the posters present are from over the pond.
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Mike Hughes wrote:

You left out a crucial spec: a folding, tiltable screen of at least 2-1/2 inches diagonal measurement. Essential when taking pictures outdoors in bright sunlight.
Apart from the SLR, all the features you want are available in the point'n'shoot cameras. A Canon Sureshot, Fuji Finepix, or similar, for around 300GBP will do all that you want and more. (We own two Sureshots, our daughter owns a Finepix, both excellent cameras.) You won't even need extra lenses, since these will have 6-to1 or better zoom with macro capability. (Good zoom and macro are both cheaper to make with small lenses, such as these cameras have.) They use AA batteries, and have electronics that will work with the lower voltage rechargeables. (BTW, recharging in the camera is if anything a a hindrance - you can't use the camera when it's plugged into the wall.)
The main difference between a $500SLR and a $300 pocket camera is the lens. The SLR will have a large (and heavy) lens. It's costly to make large pieces of glass behave optically, so the rest of the camera (sensor, electronics, focussing, etc) will be no better than the pocket camera that sells for a couple 100 less.
OTOH, SLRs with professional specs are worth owning, if you are a professional type photographer or aspire to be one. They have very large sensors with loads of megapixels, very fast electronics, storage of images in RAW format, very sharp lenses, and so on. But you 'd have to pay at least twice as much a you've specified.
BTW, don't be dazzled by megapixels numbers. 4 to 6 megapixels or so is enough, unless you want to make very large prints. However, pretty well all better pocket cameras now boast 6 megapixels and more.
--


Wolf

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I can recommend the Nikon D40, most of my recent rail stuff ( http://www.flickr.com/photos/moggs1/sets/72157594588729397/ ) on Flickr was taken with a D40
it's very easy to use... you can use it like a point-and-shoot if you like, or can use it a fully manual SLR, (or any point in between)... it's got excellent low noise in the higher ISO's and by default produces nice & deep saturated colours (but you can change the color profile to suit your needs)
the kit lens is excellent (for a kit lens), and it's light... the battery lasts for ages.. the screen on the back is nice & clear & reproduces the colours well... you'd have to be doing a lot of shooting or using the flash a lot to drain your battery in 1 day.. the battery is rechargable and you get a little charger in with the kit... battery takes about an hour to charge
it doesn't have anti-shake built in, so if this is a crucial requirement the options are: get something else, or buy a nikon lens that has 'VR' (vibration reduction).... the Nikkor vr 18-200 is supposed to be fantastic
If you don't fancy the Nikon, the good stuff people have said on this thread about the Canon EOS 350d and the 400d is all true... stick with Canon & Nikon and you won't buy a duff camera
Steve

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I can reccomend the Fiji S9600.
Whatever you buy, check the web for reviews first and then check to se if Jessops offer to match Internet prices at their shops is still on.
Then if it goes wrong you don't have to post it back to get a repair or replacement.
Best of luck
DaS
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On Tue, Apr 10, 2007 at 07:49:51AM -0700, emudas wrote:

It's a good "point n shoot" cheap camera, but in my opinion it falls down in a few areas. First, it's about the same size as an SLR - ie, annoyingly large. Second, it has a *weird* sensor where the pixels are arranged hexagonally instea dof in a square grid, which can lead to odd effects on straight lines in your pictures. And finally (and probably related to the second point) you can get odd colour artifacts in areas of high contrast.
Other than that though, it's not so bad, and I happily used one myself for some time.
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You've had lots of suggestions. You might also try asking on newsgroup rec.photo.digital.zlr
You can check out Canadian prices at http://www.henrys.com - you need cookies enabled. 6% GST and 8% PST sales taxes must be added for purchases within Ontario - other provinces vary from 0% to 10% PST.
Since the pound is currently $2.26, dividing the pre-tax Canadian dollar price by 2 gives the approximate after-tax equivalent in pounds.
I believe you can reclaim the 6% GST on leaving the country.
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Whatever else you do, take an old camera as spare on your holiday, just in case your battery runs out, or you fill the memory card at a crucial moment. It is a long way back to Canada to repeat a "missed" photo.
Bevan
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I have had the Panasonic FZ30 (8.2 MP) for over a year, and it's great... in USofA it goes for about $500 (in the upgraded 10MP 1600 ASA equiv.) 35-420mm equivalent lens, SD memory chips, MPEG movies with sound,image stabiliser, auto bracketing adjustable screen and SLR type screen, RAW capability vario elmarit lens, hotshoe and it feels nicer than the Fuji The only two things I would wish for is a wider wide angle and less of a time lag taking the shot, so the M3 with 25mm goes with me.
David Digital SLRs are good, but I would be paranoid about interchanging lenses as dust is a major issue
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wrote:

i have the fz50 which is the one that has superceded the fz30 and it's great. one thing you havent mentioned is that unlike SLRs the fz50 or 30 both have live view on their lcds. the camera lag is much less on the fz50 apparently, i've found it's almost instant, i see from DPReview they say the shutter lag is about 0.2 seconds and thats with auto focus. put on manual and it's quicker. you can get a wider angle easily by the way by getting a screw on lens... i use one, i dont even screw it on, just hold it infront as it has a larger thread :) they cost about 50 quid from jessops and the camera even has a function that uses them automatically. here's an example of the end result -
http://www.skyscrapernews.com/images/pics/712WakefieldCathedral_pic1.jpg
of course you could get an even wider lens attachment for it and go completely nuts :) cheers james
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