Wheel depth on older models.

Firstly, thanks to all for their input on my first posting here, it was a great deal of help.
As I'm starting out with nothing, and have limited funds, I have been
doing a fair bit of looking on eBay (but have spotted the over-priced parts, that can be got just as cheap in stores).
Anyway, my kit is gradually building up for my rather ambitious plan for a double layer layout.
The Princess Elizabeth 4-6-2 I ordered has now arrived, and it does need a bit of sprucing up, but seems in fair order. It does at least work anyway. However, I have had some bother with this loco, in that it only runs very sporadically, and has poor traction. The little Caledonian 0-4-0 I got with my starter kit runs very well though, and there are no dead spots on the track when running it.
I also noticed the 4-6-2 was jumping a little going over the points. Further investigation finds that the wheels are deeper in the groove than the newer model, and are fouling on the guides in the latest points. Of course it is an old Tri-ang model. I also find that it does rub on the sleepers in the track too, which happens on the new track, as well as some older stuff I got.
I suppose I'm looking at a couple of solutions; Change the wheels for later design, modify the wheels so they fit, or forget it and buy a newer model.
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Andy Hewitt
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Yep you are, much the easiest is a newer model
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I will probably end up doing that. However, is it cost effective to replace the wheels anyway? Bearing in mind I only paid 10 for this one.
Cheers.
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Andy Hewitt
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wrote:

It depends, it would be a good exercise in wheel changing, as if you buggered it up, it was only a 10 model you have broken, and it could sit static in a siding somewhere as colour.
But if you want to get up and running, the new Hornbys, are fine models in there own right.
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Well, if it comes to it, I might even try taking them down a bit, it's only the flanges that are too deep.

Yes, looks like it's going to be the way to go.
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Andy Hewitt
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wrote:

I think you'll find the flat bits that rest on the rails are a bit too wide as well?
(kim)
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That would ceratinly give a back-to-back distance the points wouldn't like.

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OK, fair enough. I'm going to rest this one up in a siding for now.
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Andy Hewitt
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Andy Hewitt wrote:

You will find that the back-to-back measurement of the wheelsets will also be off, probably enough to impair smooth running through the points. The key dimensions are at the frog, where the check rails prevent the wheels from going up the wrong side. Wheel and track dimensions must be adapted to each other for smooth running.
But don't let this deter you. It's worth a try. If you are using code 100 Peco universal points, the engine will likely negotiate the points well enough, albeit not perfectly.

Just keep in mind that after the initial expenses, model railways are cheaper than smoking, healthier, less likely to cause wrinkling of the nose by your nearest and dearest, and you have something to show for your money. ;-)
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Wolf
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Well, I gather a new engine is cheaper than replacing all my points!
Oh well, it's my birthday soon ;-)

Indeed, it was actually a toss up between the track and a tropical fish tank (again). I hoped the track would be cheaper in the long run (maybe!).
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wrote:

Be careful what you get. Consider modern big engines (4-6-0 and greater) will not run on 1st radius track. So find out about track geometry first - peco catalog one of best sources of basic info.
Then when you chose your engine consider the period, geographical area and hence livery you are most interested in. Otherwise you may be sitting there in years to come with a very nice flying scotsman in BR green with late crest next to a much nicer LMS red Princess and Duchess. Although of course its your layout, run whatever !

Nope, but you can buy and build and do lots of things over many many years and have lots of fun doing it as well as learning about the hobby.

Cheers, Simon
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Yes, I had spotted that one, my layout does allow for a couple of runs of larger radius. I plan to run the 0-4-0 on the inner track.
I have even added a siding off the outer loop as well.

Yes, I was looking to go for mostly pre-war models, and as you mention, possibly a set of LMS locos. However, my aim is to stick with steam, as this is what I am most interested in.
The track is fictional, so I might even just make it a 'preserved line' layout, where a mixture won't hurt.

Aye, that's the plan, and I'm sure I'll make plenty more mistakes too ;-)
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Andy Hewitt wrote:

IMO, No. For one thing AFAIK there aren't any cheap, drop-in conversion wheels. There is an outfit whose name I forget (I found it by googling) from whom I bought custom turned replacement wheels for a Lima GWR diesel car. RP25 profile, very nice, but they cost more than the model. Also, they showed up the poor motor, which is the next item on the list. It's never ending, like maintaining your house and garden. ;-)
Also, the Triang model is not up to modern standards in running gear, mechanism, or body detail. If you like it (presumably is has some pleasant associations for you), make a small display case, and put it up on the mantel or the wall. Buddy of mine made a wall-mounted display case about 18"x24" out of offcuts of mahogany and oak trim he happened to have, with a clear plastic front. Three shelves in it with tracks mounted on them. He glued pieces of printed backscene behind the shelves, a different scene for each level. Very decorative.
HTH
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Wolf
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Wolf said the following on 24/07/2007 14:39:

You're probably thinking of Ultrascale. They're not exactly custom turned, but they're not exactly off-the shelf either :-)
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Paul Boyd wrote:

Yes, that's it. They said to allow up to six weeks for delivery, so I inferred that they made up the wheels in batches. Small batches, probably. ;-)
Excellent product, though. Includes axle-mounted gears as required. Just dropped in. Well worth the money IMO.
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Wolf
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Wolf said the following on 24/07/2007 15:40:

It's now up to six *months* delivery :-(

They are, and will be even better if they go ahead with plans to introduce a bigger range of steel tyres.
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Paul Boyd
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 15:19:48 +0100, Paul Boyd

They were however a deliberate direct replacement.
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Aye, I can see that with this one anyway. Oh well, nothing ventured, as they say :-)
I guess I've learnt something from this, as I didn't realise there were different depths of track available. I know there is for Scalextric, but I have the deeper grooves in the set I have, so older cars will run on it.

I don't think I'd go that far, it doesn't actually have any special meaning for me, other than I wanted a large loco. I think I'll probably just paint it up a bit, and stick it in a siding somewhere.
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snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com (Andy Hewitt) wrote:
<snip>

You could remove some bits and weather it so that it looks like a rusting hulk. ;-)
I notice that the local Wal-Mart is now selling a selection of 1:24 model cars decorated to look like they belong in a junk yard.
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Martin S.

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Bit of a shame with a Princess Royal class. I might still plan to paint it in LMS colours, and stick it on a display only layout.

Hmm, yes the weathered stuff is OK, except you are kind of stuck with that look, and 1:24 would look a little odd surely :-)
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