Wiring electrofrog points for manual operation under DCC

Could someone give me a quick rundown of how to wire a Peco live frog point for DCC use without a point motor being attached? This is for a
very simple layout where the points will be hand operated and ideally I don't want any associated switches with the points for switching polarity etc.
On the same topic, any advice of a suitable DCC controller to investigate for a simple layout with 3 continuous circuits with crossovers between them and a couple of sidings?
All advice gratefully received.
ROB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Robert Flint" wrote

I've not found it necessary to adopt any special wiring.
John.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Flint wrote:

As with DC wiring ensure that you only feed from the toe of the points. To properly wire for DCC you would need some sort of switching as DCC short circuit currents are much higher, up to the max current of the booster, than DC and you could burn out the contacts on the switch blades. As John says you can get away with it as I have done. To minimize the risk I have IBJs at the crossing joins so that the section at risk of shorting is reduced.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

Thanks. On a continuous loop how is it posible to only feed the toe as the supply creeps up rounf the other way, as it were!
My plan had been to ensure that every point on the layout was connected to its relevant supply, including the main circuits AND the sidngs, but put insulated fishplates on all the frog connections of the points. Is this correct?
ROB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Flint wrote:

You have to use insulated rail joiners on the other ends of the switch (everywhere except the toe).
Mark Thornton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 10:28:36 +0000, Mark Thornton

You don't need insulated joiners on the outside rails, only on the frog rails, ie 2 per point. Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Keith Norgrove" wrote

That's quite correct, but it's not bad practice to isolate all four rail.
John.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For DCC that is correct, only addition is if you have a reverse loop or triangle where you will need a fully isolated section to prevent one rail joining the other. Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Norgrove wrote:

The same as DC.
Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Norgrove wrote:-

According to the quickstart guide provided with Bachmann's E-Z Command it's necessary to isolate both rails where two turnouts are joined as a crossover. I am assuming this is best done with a pair of isolating fishplates?
(kim)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01 Jan 2005 17:32:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (kim) wrote:

Correct, one of those is a frog rail of one turnout, the other the frog rail of the other, so complies with the rule to put two insulated joiners on the two rails of the frog. Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(kim) wrote:

Out of interest, would it be OK to use a small air gap rather than insulated rail joiners, or would it be risky with expansion and contraction due to temperature? I wasn't planning on using any rail joiners if I could help it and wire each track individually but at the same time would prefer a rail joiner to unreliable track!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 09:23:43 GMT, "Michael Walker"

Most of mine are just that, air gaps, till I get round to fitting cosmetic fishplates. Depends how well you fix everything down, in some cases I have glued a sliver of plasticard in the gap to stop it closing up. Keith

Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael Walker" wrote

insulated
I have used this approach in the past - mainly to allow easy removal of pointwork in the event of a fault. You should be alright providing you lay your trackwork when the temperature is high (mid-Summer for instance) as otherwise the gap can certainly close up due to rail expansion.
John.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks to Keith and John for their replies, and the good advice to wait for a hot day to lay track (it's the middle of summer here although you wouldn't know it at the moment!).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael Walker" wrote

for
wouldn't
LOL - you'd certainly know it was winter if you were here in Blighty! ;-)
Blighty - now that's a blast from the past!
John.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Flint wrote:

See the rough diagram of a set of points where the I is where the insulated fish plates are required.
/ I / / -------/--X--I-- ------------------
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.