ZTC's Dreadful Service

"MartinS" wrote

No comment,
John.
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LOL! Depends whether "this country" means England, or the United Kingdom, or England-and-Wales.
--
Martin S.

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"MartinS" wrote

Nope, nothing to do with Wales - I love the place.
It's a quality issue I'm afraid - we stopped stocking Dapol some years ago because I was fed up with getting crap from them.
John.
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^^^^
Is that a technical term??
VBG ;-)
--
Colin

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"Colin Reeves" wrote

Not technical, but most certainly descriptive! ;-)
John.
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At the risk of sounding disputatious, if they're not doing it, then the will can't be very serious. As for Peco, I thought the track was made overseas. If you mean they are going to make the Collett goods loco in Britain, we'll see. As long as they keep very quiet, produce only tiny quantities, and stick to making it in an old barn, they might get away with it.
The

As long as they operate at the craft end of the market, they are classed as "heritage" and "revival" operations, and that will be OK. Once they get above 10 or so employees, they are classed as "industrial manufacturing" and can look forward to a visit from some local authority chaps.

They give you livery variations and artistic licence in the shape of the models compared to the prototypes. What more do you want?
Cheers, Steve
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"Steve W" wrote

No, it's made in the UK and represents a significant proportion of our turnover.

I wasn't thinking about this at all. I think the price will make it a non-starter in terms of volume sales.
John.
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At the risk of generating a whole load of angst, I was under the impression that Peco rail was definitely not the best on the market. I base this on comments and discussions concerning the appalling state of the 45mm and 32mm track work that was only a year or two back installed at Cheddar Models factory and which deteriorated so rapidly that it was not worth recovering a month or so back, when the business closed and the Cheddar Steam Club were offered it for free.
Our small group are ground clearing and about to construct a rather large out door run of 45mm track work at the preserved Nene Valley Railway depot to compliment our existing 'in the coach' 44ft OO gauge layout, so are exploring the track work possibilities. It seems that the Peco rail down at Cheddar which was mainly used to run the live steam locos suffered from the sleepers becoming very brittle indeed and very rapidly breaking up. The rail bed was on resin bonded play over solid steel framing and there was little perceptible movement in the track supports, other than common expansion which was allowed for in the design of the layout.
Cost is a huge factor in large areas of 45mm track work. LGB is very expensive :0(
Cheers.
--
Roy

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"Roy" wrote

I suspect that the problem with the G-gauge track is that the sleepering appears to be fairly ordinary plastic whilst the smaller scale stuff uses something more akin to rigid engineering plastic. The discharges (oil, steam and water) from live steam operation will all have an impact of the plastic used for the 45mm gauge stuff.
Certainly my OO-scale railway which uses Peco finescale code 75 track has had much of the trackwork in situ for seven or eight years without any problems at all and requires minimal cleaning.
John.
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John Turner wrote:

It sounds like one should paint the sleepers before putting them outside.

I have Peco track from 1966 that is still usable/reusable and Graham Farish from 1964 that refuses to go away and die! Peco turnouts must be made of a different material as their lifespan seems to be much shorter.
Regards, Greg.P.
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"Greg Procter" wrote

Peco pointwork appears to use the same sleepering base as their G-gauge track, so that *might* explain why, but even so the stresses to which (electrified) points are subjected to would have an effect on their longevity.
John.
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I wondered if it was the action of sunlight and weathering which caused the plastic to break up. The nickel steel rail itself was in fine condition and the problem seemed to be confined to the plastic chairs and sleepers which became extremely brittle.

Our NVR layout has been running Peco OO-Gauge inside for years without problems. It's open to the public every weekend and during all of the summer steam gala functions is operating daily non stop. Over the average year the whole layout infrastructure gets a hell of a hammering. Points need regular replacement due to surface wear. Rakes of 40 or so mineral wagons or long passenger rakes hauled by a huge variety of locos is not uncommon.
Are you running your OO-scale railway outdoors? I have been tempted to have a go at this for ages, but have been put off by the fact that we have a damn great oak tree inside our boundary that covers half the garden and which is protected under a TPO. It's very tempting though to have a run out of the workshop and around the garden.
Cheers.
--
Roy

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Roy wrote:

Try Tenmille track - it is as bullet-proof as the chunkier LGB stuff, but nearer Peco in price (IIRC). Had experience of it in 32 & 45mm, with live steam, on outdoor, indoor & exhibition layouts, and it has been more than up to the job.
Steve Banfield
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Thanks Steve. I will have a look at it and get it priced.
Cheers.
--
Roy

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Roy,

I'm not aware of the same type of situation with Peco 7mm scale track. I know one or two people who use this track on outdoor layouts and they don't seem to suffer this problem, with their tracks being down for several years with no noticeable deterioration. I wonder if the situation at Cheddar had anything to do with a lot of live steam running.
Jim.
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I use Hornby flexible and semi-flexible OO track, so I can't tell you what happens to Peco from my experience! However, I will say that Peco insulating fishplates are bloody awful: I've recently had to replace a couple that have been down for just a year and a half (barely two summers), and as soon as I started fiddling with the track they disintegrated into lots of tiny tiny bits.
--
Jane
OO in the garden http://www.yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk/railway/railway.html
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writes ....

I don't know if it would work for you but I use the standard metal connectors everywhere then if I need an insulating gap I make a cut (care of Mr Dremel) then "plug the gap" with a bit of milliput moulded to match the rail profile ...
--

All the best,

Chris Wilson
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The insulating fishplates are not UV hardened. Think mu PVC versus old srtyle PVC double glazing.
I'd go with cutting an insulating slot and then filling with milliput (from experience I know milliput will cope with pretty arduous conditions, sea air, sea spray etc) or araldite per Chris's post. Long term per your garden oo just so long as it ain't a metal filled epoxy then it'd be a contender for experiment.
--
Nick Coe (UK)
Available - Will work for money :-)
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Roy wrote: <snip>

It sounds as if you should ask Peco the question "Is your track suitable for use outdoors? If yes, are there any precautions we need to take?" is called for. Keep question and response if you go ahead, just in case.
--
Cheers for now,

John from Harrow, Middx
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I have to agree with comment about there being no desire to manufacture anything in the UK and I mean nationally and not just model railways. It is the lack of committment to manufacturing that has been the the biggest disappointment with the Government and in 1997 I had expected and hoped for a good deal more. Unfortunately the situation is getting considerabley worse.
Kevin
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