Al-GMAW 6000-series

Hi all Is eg. 5083 (Al-Mg) much easier to Al-GMAW than 6000-series (Al-Si-Mg)? On 5083 I easily get really need welds, even if I say it myself.
On 6000-series the arc seems really fiesty. Welding 6000-series to 5083 it seems the 6000-series kick the arc off and the arc lands on the 5083? In other ways 6000-series seems like harder work to weld. This fits with others' experience?
By the way - 3mm (1/8th-inch) thick 6000-series seems to be were the most work is, as I've experienced so far ??
Best wishes, Rich S
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I forgot to say - GMAW wire is 1.2mm (0.047") 5356
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Hi again - what I'm finding on 6000-series alloys (typically extrusions) is that as soon as you get into a real spray arc the arc gets feisty - vivid colours, spitting and rasping, and if welding 6000-series to 5083, kicks sideways off the 6000-series onto the 5000-series. Oh yes - and huge condensations of black powder around the welds ?? If you are in a lower power condition so you see Al depositing almost like a stack-of-dimes, even if 5000-series to 6000-series, calm arc, no misbehaviour and shiny silver welds metal and little condesation / sooting around the weld. But - not much fusing power and you can be left with re-entrant weld toes which look excessively like you are risking cold laps. ??
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For what it's worth - moved on further. Getting things behaving well, doing Al-GMAW Using 1.2mm wire 5183 wire (Al-Mg-Mn), Spray is good - "just" at 10m/min, clean at around 12.4m/min and smoothly in it goes for long runs at 15m/min. Less than 10m/min - pulse. Totally sweet. 5000-series to 6000-series no problem. Come a long way. Trust the synergic in pulse - easily going from 5m/min to 8m/min for different thickness combinations and joint geometries. Getting into happy space. This is talking about good industrial machines in a high-end metal fabrications shop, by the way...
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"Richard Smith" wrote in message ...

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The black powder may be oxidized alloying elements. A quick test is to heat it in the reducing portion of a propane flame. Copper oxide will revert to the colored metal.
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