Braze or weld ?


Got the grandson a new BMX bike for Christmas , and he wants stunt pegs on
the back . I've got some SS tubing that will make some very nice pegs , but
I need to attach a stepped washer to one end - the washer will go under the
axle nuts to attach the pegs . I don't have any SS wire for the MIG , so it
looks like I'll need to use the OA rig to attach 'em . I've got a couple of
varieties of brazing rod , and some pieces of SS that I can cut into narrow
strips . I'm not sure which alloy any of the SS is , thus the question -
braze or weld ?
Reply to
Snag
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mattathayde had written this in response to
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------------------------------------- Snag wrote:
brazing ~should~ work fine but idk if i would feel comfortable with it being brazed. honestly i dont see how it is cost effective to try and make these as apposed to buying them. its cool and all you want to make them for him but i just dont think the time and materials you put into them are going to produce as good of a peg as is already mass produced. also since he just wants them on the back you want gnarling or some other form of grip on them. there are 2 styles of pegs if my memory serves me correctly, textured and smooth. if you want to do a lot of standing or riding someone else on pegs you want the textured, if you want to be doing grinding on rails and such you are going to want the smooth ones.
maybe prices have changed a lot but i remember pegs being in the 20 buck range when i got my bmx bike, granted that was like 8-10 years ago but i doubt they are much more expensive now
-matt
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Reply to
mattathayde
Most of the high end, steel framed, road bicycles have brazed or silver soldered joints, although the frames are made with "lugs" so that the joints are actually socketed joints rather then simple butt joints. Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce In Bangkok
Hey , you miss the point ... I WANNA make these ! I've got the materials on hand , and have the machinery (mill and lathe) and tooling to do the job right . Including two types of knurling tool . I'm leaning right now towards making a cupped washer to go under the axle nut and threading the sleeve onto it .
"Where'd ya get those cool pegs Scooter ?"
"My Grandpa made 'em for me !"
Reply to
Snag
Killjoy.
If we made all our decisions on what is cost-effective, we'd all live in studio apartments and wouldn't have garages full of fun toys -- er, tools.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
If you braze make sure that there's plenty of surface area for a bond -- it's not necessary if the braze is perfect, but if it isn't...
"Where'd you get the hole in your ankle Scooter?"
"My Granpa made some stunt pegs for me ..."
(yea, yea -- now I'm being a killjoy. Were it me I'd still make the pegs, though).
Reply to
Tim Wescott
If I go with braze , it'll be a similar joint . Plenty of surface area for strength . But for ease of install and being able to get at the axle nuts , I'm leanin' towards a threaded design . With at least 3/4" of threads for strength . Scooter's a big boy for 9 yrs , he's a lineman on the youth football team in his town ... and a good one too , if I do say so myself .
Reply to
Snag
mattathayde had written this in response to
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------------------------------------- Snag wrote:
well dang if you have knurling tools then by all means, i was expecting you were just going to braze on the cup washers and just slap them on. i am all for the hand made factor (heck all of the xmas presents im giving this year are hand made... guess i dont have much option though being a poor art student that has access to a full glass shop and a full metalsmith studio ;) )
and mr. wescott, i have to think about cost effectiveness because of all the toys i "justify" haha
-matt
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Reply to
mattathayde
I once read a very scientific article about how "bronze welding" a British variation of brazing albeit with a different rod, was better for building motorcycle frames. Apparently Norton had built some one off frames for their racing motorcycles and found that the welded joints had cracked as apposed to the non-cracking bronze welded joints of the so called "production" feather-bed frame used on the normal team bikes.
Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce In Bangkok
If you go with welding, you should use a rod that has more chrome and nickel than the parent material. Otherwise you can get carbides formed in the weld and have cracking. I have some 312 stainless rods and could chop up a couple of rods so they fit into a regular envelop and mail them to you. But I would use silver brazing.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
You got the wrong guy. I wasn't fixing the bicycle :-)
Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce In Bangkok
That would be me ... and I've decided to silver braze/solder them . Figgered out tonight that the axles are 3/8-24 SAE , which I've got a tap for (thought they'd be metric) . The slug in the end of the sleeve is going to be the axle nut ... end inside the sleeve will be hexed for tightening purposes .
Reply to
Snag
Do an honest cost accounting and let us know how much these things are worth, i.e., no material from scrap and spare time stuff. Material at cost plus transportation; labor at prevailing rates; overhead including SS and medical payments.
Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
Bruce In Bangkok
The ones on my sons bike are threaded onto the axle shafts. Did I miss something?

Reply to
Bob La Londe
Accidently hit send too soon. They are not threaded on shaft or if they are they also have the nut on from the inside. They look like they are turned out of a single piece. Probably a cone welded into a cylinder and then turned to look like one piece. I would weld it myself.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Yup , or a one piece extrusion . I've seen both types online . I'm still not sure how I wanna do these , it changes day to day . Good thing is that once I decide , I've got the equipment to do it either way (weld/braze or threaded) .
Reply to
Snag

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