Can I convert my MIG (A365 mig 100) to a TIG, Is this possible please?

Hi guys I'm wondering is it possible to convert my A365 MIG 100 electric pr oduct to work as an electric TIG welder using either fusion or a very thin
Tungsten rod please?
I basically need to weld 2 plates of 75 x 1.2mm mild steel together along t he edges/seems without melting them totally or leaving a large weld bed/run for a prototype of a tool im creating (sorry I sound vague with my descrip tions but the ideas not patented yet so I don't want to give too much away on the design/use of the project I'm trying to produce at this time.)
As you can probably guess I've never welded before so I apologies if I'm us ing the wrong terminologies here when I'm trying to explain the process I n eed to carry out.
Any educated/experienced help or assistance in this would be greatly apprec iated.
Regards,
Phil
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Hi guys I'm wondering is it possible to convert my A365 MIG 100 electric product to work as an electric TIG welder using either fusion or a very thin Tungsten rod please?
I basically need to weld 2 plates of 75 x 1.2mm mild steel together along the edges/seems without melting them totally or leaving a large weld bed/run for a prototype of a tool im creating (sorry I sound vague with my descriptions but the ideas not patented yet so I don't want to give too much away on the design/use of the project I'm trying to produce at this time.)
As you can probably guess I've never welded before so I apologies if I'm using the wrong terminologies here when I'm trying to explain the process I need to carry out.
Any educated/experienced help or assistance in this would be greatly appreciated.
Regards,
Phil
============Practice, practice, practice.
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On 05/01/2017 07:42 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Jim is right, you can either practice welding for a while and do it yourself, or you can pay someone to do it for you. From the size of the job you are describing, it should not be an expensive thing to get done unless you need 50 of them.
If you spend the time learning to weld, you will get a better feel for what works and what does not work for designing welded pieces.
On the other hand, if you pay someone, you can probably get some advice from the person, and you can have the welded part in a few hours.
TIG welding is a cleaner process than MIG welding, so it would be a good choice for a tightly controlled weld area. It also requires a lot more practice to do well.
I am not familiar with the A365 100 machine and could not find it easily on google, but unless you intentionally bought a multiprocess welder, the short answer to your question is no, it can't be converted. A dedicated MIG welder cannot readily be converted to a TIG welder. MIG is a constant voltage process and TIG is a constant current process. Also, TIG works a lot better if you have a high frequency unit for arc starting (on steel welding).
Good Luck, BobH
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On Mon, 1 May 2017 06:15:02 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The short answer is no. The machines work diffefently. One is a constant current machine and the other is a constant voltage machine.Your cheap mig machine is a constant voltage machine, TIG is constant current. With a proper TIG setup you can weld the part using autogenous welding, which means adding no filler metal. This process can be used with mild steel to get good welds. You are probably money ahead by having someone who kinows how to weld your prototypes and then buying a TIG welder to weld your own parts. Eric
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On Monday, May 1, 2017 at 2:15:04 PM UTC+1, Phil R wrote:

product to work as an electric TIG welder using either fusion or a very thi n Tungsten rod please?

the edges/seems without melting them totally or leaving a large weld bed/r un for a prototype of a tool im creating (sorry I sound vague with my descr iptions but the ideas not patented yet so I don't want to give too much awa y on the design/use of the project I'm trying to produce at this time.)

using the wrong terminologies here when I'm trying to explain the process I need to carry out.

eciated.

Thanks for your advice guys, I'll keep on learning using the MIG I already have and take it from there. :-)
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On 05/01/2017 06:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What part of the world are you in?
BobH
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