Clean welding

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Reply to
Ignoramus14704
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Check out the striker. Notice the one thing missing from what otherwise looks just like the ones you buy today?
Reply to
William Bagwell
Yeah, interesting. I didn't even recognize it the first time I looked at the picture because of what it was missing. It even took me a few seconds to recognize it when I went looking for it this time. I've never seen one like that. Have you?
Reply to
Curt Welch
Guess I'm dense. I see what looks like a pair of pliers on the desk next to the hammer and the tube. Is that the striker you are talking about?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
"SteveB" wrote in sci.engr.joining.welding:
Nope: the striker [igniter?] only has a flat rectangular plate rather than the circular cup the "modern" ones have.
Try clicking on the picture and, then, enlarge it to double size and you'll have a clear view.
Reply to
RAM³
I also paid no attention to the striker, because the woman was so hot.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19365
The caption reads " ....... serious shortages of skilled workers by doing such semi-skilled jobs as the one here" . That's not exactly 'semi skilled' in my book.
Ignoramus14704 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
I would say it is a sexist comment. I agree that this is as skilled welding job as I can think of.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus29202
Now that you mention it, I think I have seen at least one with the cup missing and still in use. Lost count of how many I have seen in the trash because idiots don't know (or care?) that the flint is replaceable. But no, have never seen one made that way until this picture. Presuming it was made that way since none of the other tools appear abused.
Shame on you! ;-) But thank for posting!
Reply to
William Bagwell
It's the men standing in the background chatting that are doing all the high paid skilled work. :)
Reply to
Curt Welch
Is that the black thing between the hammer head and the tube?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Knew and old dude that just died last year at 96 years. He was a REAL blacksmith and had the hands to prove it. During WWII, he instructed women on how to weld. He said that they were better students because they had less testosterone, didn't know everything upon arrival, and were good at hand skills like penmanship, fine sewing, and such. He said, "Those wimmen wuz DAMN picky about their work."
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Yes, that's the striker head. One side of the wire body is hiding behind the handle of the hammer so you can't see it. The other side is visible. The finger-loops in the middle can both be seen. One of the loops is on top of the head of the pliers. The circle spring at the bottom is between the piler handles and the hammer handle. It's a normal looking striker except there is no cup.
Reply to
Curt Welch
I've been learning blacksmithing for the past 6 months or so. My hands are constantly dirty (far more so than with welding and grinding). I'm developing calluses on many spots (both hands), there's always at least one spot healing from a burn, and I think my fingers are getting "fatter". I've never seen something change my hands as quick as blacksmithing seems to. I can only imagine what a life of full time backsmithing must do to someone's hands!
Reply to
Curt Welch
Doubtfully a full time blacksmith, in the old times, could live a very long life, however, due to fumes and such.
Here, however, is a blacksmith seemingly making a nice living out of his skills.
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus28480
Okay. Now I got it. What amazes me is that this lady is wearing normal clothing, and that WHITE shirt. She either just got there, or is very good. So good she doesn't get dirty.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
This old guy would make custom tables by making a wagon wheel from scratch, then putting a glass top on it. He'd cut all the spokes with a spokeshave, mortise and tenon them in, and then by himself bend the 2" wide flat bar around a metal form and then walk it around the wooden assembly and join it.
He was a treasure. He'd get large classes of students from all levels of schools who would come to his place and see the demonstrations and hear a message on "What do you want to do with your life." His shop was a log building that was originally built by Chinese laborers about forty miles from his house. It was BIG. Air tight with a huge hearth. He disassembled it, and hauled it there and reassembled it in the days of the Model A Fords over horrible roads. Had a huge bellows, which he had rebuilt himself because it was older than he was. I would walk around his shop and just ask, what's this, what's this, what's this, what's this. And he never quit flirting with the girls.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
That's how you know you're still alive!
Reply to
TinLizziedl
She must not be doing any grinding!
I suspect the shot was for publicity, or maybe even a class. It doesn't look like any real shop I've ever seen.
Reply to
Curt Welch
She's holding the torch like a pencil. Is there any significance to that?
Thanks, Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise

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