Was The General a Unique Engine ?

just picked up the old AMT model kit and would like to do her as an old beat up workhouse out West, a nice dusty coat of charcoal grey,
etc..
Was the General a unique engine? I've only seen a reference to a sister engine, so I am not sure if it was just a standard 4-4-0 that just has some history behind it.
Anyone have this kit? I've not received mine yet. Curious as to its scale. It's supposed to build up to 25 inches.
thx - craig
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Should work just fine, but remember that even old locos were very well taken care of in the days before we evolved into throw-away technology.
Engine crews were most commonly permanantly assigned to a single loco, and as it was "their" loco the crews tended to take a lot of pride in their baby and kept her as clean and shiny as they could manage.
Engineers would quite commonly buy fancy parts such as custom whistles for "their" locos out of their own pockets.

Just a loco that happened to become famous by being in the right place at the right time.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_General_%28locomotive%29
It would need some minor updating to be convincing as a postwar western locomotive, but the basic 4-4-0 template stayed very much the same for almost 50 years.
~Pete
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wrote:

Should work just fine, but remember that even old locos were very well taken care of in the days before we evolved into throw-away technology.
Engine crews were most commonly permanantly assigned to a single loco, and as it was "their" loco the crews tended to take a lot of pride in their baby and kept her as clean and shiny as they could manage.
Engineers would quite commonly buy fancy parts such as custom whistles for "their" locos out of their own pockets.

Just a loco that happened to become famous by being in the right place at the right time.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_General_%28locomotive%29
It would need some minor updating to be convincing as a postwar western locomotive, but the basic 4-4-0 template stayed very much the same for almost 50 years. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
A nice picture from Nashville in 1864 with several different types. Interesting picture. http://www.shorpy.com/node/6548?size=_original
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It *is* an interesting picture, but every loco present -on which you can count the wheels, that is- appears to be a standard inside-framed 4-4-0 "American" type.
Not surprising, as by that time they were almost ubiquitous.
~Pete
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wrote:

It *is* an interesting picture, but every loco present -on which you can count the wheels, that is- appears to be a standard inside-framed 4-4-0 "American" type. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Sorry, I meant manufacturers. Another slightly different view. http://www.shorpy.com/Battle-of-Nashville-1864?size=_original
If you are bored one day, have a look at the complete site. There are some wonderful pictures on all subjects scattered all over the place. You will soon find that your one day will be 2 or 3 days ago.
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wrote:

Can't beat those old plate cameras for resolution! This looks like maybe taken on a 16x20.
And, oh yeah, can easily lose a couple days on this site ...
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wrote:

I like this one, there is so much detail. http://www.shorpy.com/node/1782?size=_original
And for something completely different http://www.funimag.com/photoblog/index.php/articles/us-mount-tamalpais-muir-woods-railway / Now that would really be fun if it was still running.
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wrote:

Dang! You can spend 30 minutes on just that one photo.

http://www.funimag.com/photoblog/index.php/articles/us-mount-tamalpais-muir-woods-railway /
Their was a conventional loco assisted ride to the bottom for the fain of heart. IIRC, the never had a passenger derailment.
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wrote:

Now you know why I said that you will lose two or three days at least.

I have not read of any crashes.
Going even further away from the O.Post, I'll offer a couple more links from that era (almost) and then I'm out of this thread.
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i c_1259288206 is a tram ride through San Francisco. Although it says from 1909 on the page, it is apparently shot in 1905, just before the earthquake. 7.09 minutes
http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906 http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906_2 http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906_3 http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906_4 http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906_5 http://www.archive.org/details/SanFranc1906_6 These videos show the damage done after the earthquake.
http://www.archive.org/details/tmp_50168 Is also after the earthquake but from a different source.
http://railforthevalley.wordpress.com/2009/08/08/lartigue-monorail-a-very-early-gadgetbahnen-a-history-lesson-for-translink / shows one of the oddest lines ever built, this video shows the modern day reproduction fitted with a diesel engine. There is archive video at http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id 629 of the original steam version.
Apologies for going OT.
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On 9/15/2010 7:09 AM, nemesis wrote:

The final video of Mt. Tamalpais at the link above, done by a teacher and some students and running 9:30, says that during the 34 years of operation there was one fatality and several critical injuries. It does not state whether these were passengers or workers. For comparison, Disneyland has had a number of fatalities during its 50+ years of operation, though nearly all that I can remember are due to stupidity on the part of the deceased, such as taking off the seat belt and standing up on the Matterhorn ride.
--

Rick Jones
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wrote:

http://railforthevalley.wordpress.com/2009/08/08/lartigue-monorail-a-very-early-gadgetbahnen-a-history-lesson-for-translink /
Rail is decidedly ON topic! Thanks for the links.
--
National Socialism showed what can happen when very ordinary people get
control of a state and the merely opportunistic are regarded as
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wrote:

Yer welcome.
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wrote:

Really nice close up of General J.C. Robinson from 1865. http://www.shorpy.com/node/5979?size=_original
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On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 23:28:38 +0100, nemesis wrote:

Wow, that harbour scene in the background..
--
Groet, salut, Wim.

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wrote:

Another harbour scene for you. http://www.shorpy.com/node/6004?size=_original
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wrote:

Appears to be a Steam Tug at the end of the wharf.
--
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wrote:

It does appear so, but my eyes keep getting drawn to the "smudge" by the gun carriages. Presumably that's someone moving around.
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2010 23:46:52 +0100, nemesis wrote:

is it one, or two tugs? thanks for the picture !!
--
Groet, salut, Wim.

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wrote:

It's one steamer apparently, named Relief, although there is another message saying that there are two steamers and Relief is actually the aft end of a paddle steamer
You can read the various comments at http://www.shorpy.com/node/6004
Thank the people at Shorpy for the work they are doing, but I am glad that you enjoyed the picture as much as I did.
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wrote:

Damn it! Found two pictures of the General from 1964. http://www.shorpy.com/node/7447?size=_original http://www.shorpy.com/node/7446
Also a pic of Atlanta from 1864. http://www.shorpy.com/node/4759
Richmond in ruins from 1865 http://www.shorpy.com/node/2457?size=_original (There is what looks to be the remains of a train near the top right hand corner)
Damn! That's another day gone.
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