high temp thread lubrication?

I have recently acquired a large ceramic outdoor cooker. The top damper threads up and down to open/close. Temps inside can reach 800F, so the thread (3/4-10)
needs some unusual lubrication. At the same time, you don't want anything that will drip onto the food, or dry up and flake toxic stuff onto the food.
These cookers have a recurrent problem with stuck top dampers. I am sure that some kind of anti-sieze or hi-temp grease must exist that will work.
Ideas?
GWE
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Grant wrote:

Graphite.
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Redesign so the damper actuating thread is exterior and does not get so hot. ie, thread - lever - pivot - damper
Graphite. Not toxic, stays put pretty well after initial application and running it up and down a few times.
You might also put some sort of lapping or grinding compound on it and run it up and down a few dozen times, then clean that off, to decrease the fit class of the thread, which should really be quite loose in this application, where there will be scaling and expansion issues.
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Silicone grease. They sell food-grade stuff for meat grinders at restaurant supply places. The steam table pans work great for parkerizing, too,should you get into one.
Stan
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Phillips Milk of Magnesia, you can buy it at most grocery or drug stores.
We have used it with great results for assembly/disassemble of heat treating fixtures.
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Tim wrote:

You're kidding! Just goop it on there? Isn't that stuff runny?
Grant
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No, really. We just dipped the end of the bold, and spun it down. It dries to a chalky powder and provides an excellent dry film lubricant like graphite, but is not only edible, but a lot less mess.
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On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 13:04:43 -0500, Tim wrote:

"Edith! This is the milk of magnesia! I told you to bring me the Kaopectate!"
;-)
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Grant wrote:

It dries after a bit.
--
John R. Carroll



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"Grant" wrote: You're kidding! Just goop it on there? Isn't that stuff runny? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ And what you have left over can be mixed with vodka to make Phillips screwdrivers.
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13:58:09 -0700, Leo Lichtman, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

GROAN!
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Vodka and orange juice is called a Screwdriver.
So, vodka and prune juice must be a Piledriver.
Joe Gwinn
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GMT, Grant, snipped-for-privacy@kirkland.net wrote:

800F? Are you sure?
I use AMSOIL X-Treme Synthetic Food Grade Grease in the coffee roaster, but it's not rated for any 800F.
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Would talcum power (soap stone) work?

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I think talc would work. As I remember it takes a higher temperature than 800 degrees F to change talc to steatite.
Dan
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higher temperature than 800 degrees F to change talc to steatite. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ If that's the case, then just rub the threads with one of your soapstone markers. (I assume that Xmilker is right that talc is soapstone) )And if it's not, maybe it would still work--it has a slippery feel.)
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Leo Lichtman wrote:

Graphite melts at 3675 C according to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_elements_by_melting_point
Wonder if drawing on the threads with a carpenter's pencil would work?
--Winston
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Winston, snipped-for-privacy@bigbrother.net wrote:

Not likely. For one, a pencil "lead" isn't pure graphite, for another, graphite oxidizes at much lower temperatures, especially finely pulverized graphite. I used it in a glass kiln, mixed with other stuff to keep glass from sticking to the mold. The graphite portion would be gone after a single use to say, 1200F or so.
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Try wrapping them with plumbers teflon tape. I have used it to prevent seizing of stailess steel nuts on stainless steel bolts.
The temperatures weren that high though, but it was in live steem heat exchangers.

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