Newbie needs help - Joining uneven thickesses?

I am working on a project that requires welding and am thinking of using this as an excuse to buy some equipment (Oxy-Acetylene) and
learn how to weld. However, I don't know if the welds are considered difficult and something that should be left to a professional so I'm seeking opinions.
The project involves cutting/drilling a 1 1/4" diameter hole in a 1/4" steel plate, sticking a steel stub axle in the hole and welding it in place (essentially, joining a 1 1/4" steel rod to a 1/4" steel plate). I gather that is can be quite difficult since you have to control the heating of two uneven thicknesses of metal. SO the questions are...
1) Is welding something like this really hard and should be left to a professional or is it something I could do with some practice? BTW, it's a garden tractor part so it's not a safety issue if the weld fails.
2) All the equipment seems to include specs as to what thickness metal can be welded (i.e. welds up to 1/4" steel with included tips, up to 1/2" steel with optional tips) but if I'm welding metal of two different thicknesses, do I need equipment that handles the thicker of the two or the thinner?
Thanks for your input!
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cc109 wrote: (clip) thinking of using this as an excuse to buy some equipment (Oxy-Acetylene) (clip) Is welding something like this really hard and should be left to a professional or is it something I could do with some practice? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I don't think ANY professional would even consider oxy/acetylene for this job. However, it could be done easily with an inexpensive buzz box. ^^^^^^^^^^^ (clip) do I need equipment that handles the thicker of

^^^^^^^^^^^ Thicker. If you set up for the thinner side of the weld, the thicker side will NEVER come up to temperature.
Oxy/acetylene is a very useful and versatile form of welding, but you will be disappointed if you try to learn to use it on a job like this. And, you are talking about quite a bit of expense. A simple AC welder will do the job easily for a lot less money, and is also very useful as a general purpose welder.
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snipped-for-privacy@sneakemail.com (cc109) wrote in message

It's not very difficult using stick welding. It's more difficult using O/A.
I'm also a newbie, but from my limited knowledge my opinion would be: buy a stick welder (preferably 220V, most preferably DC inverter), some 2.5mm or 3.2mm rods (or the equivalent in inches), practice running welds on top of a similar steel plate for hald an hour or so and go for it. This particular kind of weld is actually quite easy.
Warning: read about removing slag, the angle of the stick and the dangers of welding (UV rays) first. A google search in this group would be better than nothing.
Second warning: "not a safety issue if the weld fails" may be optimistic when powered tools are involved.

The thicker one, normally. Or (experience welders please read the following sentence twice before criticising it) you need equipment that handles a thickness sufficient to widthstand intended mechanical forces. In the above case, a decent stick welder will do.
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