SMAW coffee cans?

I want to prototype a better muffler for a small engine. I don't want to
put much money into it, nor can it be too heavy. So, I have coffee cans.
If I had OA or TIG I'd be all set, but I still have not come up with
funds for either. I do have stick, and did get in some of the smaller
sizes of 6013 with the idea that it might be useful for this sort of
idiocy. I can probably stick to welding on the rims of the can where
they are thicker.
Any tips (that don't involve buying a new machine)?
Yes, I realize that it will rust out in short order.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
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You're going to have a rough time using SMAW and *any* size electrode on coffee cans. I've practiced welding soup cans together with a baby MIG and had a rough time. I would never say impossible but in my experience it will have to be quick starts and stops.
Some other ideas: Put ice water into one can first. Use a heatproof caulking on the leaks. Rent an O/A set and braze. Go the local CC and have a student TIG it.
Reply to
Zorro
I used a Geo-Metro muffler on a small Powermate Generator. It worked fine.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
...and if you look back, you'll find that I (probably among others) suggested using a car muffler when you were asking how to quiet it down. Glad it worked out.
The present engine is on equipment that I'm being allowed to use, but which I don't feel comfortable significantly modifying, as I don't own it - hanging a car muffler off if it would mean needing to support the car muffler. I've bought a replacement of the orginal, laughable muffler, which was a whopping $8.35. This leaves me with the remaining part of the original muffler, and a desire to see, in a quick and dirty fashion, if I can cobble up something a whole lot quieter by making the thing quite a bit larger, while still being light enough to be hung out on the end of a pipe that's screwed into the motor (that is the total mounting mechanisim). If I can weld on some coffee cans and poke appropriate holes in them, this seams feasible. It's not required, it's more recreational "can I do this", and it if works the owner of the equipment might appreciate it. Otherwise I'll suggest that he get a small car muffler.
If it works reasonable well, and I eventually get a TIG torch to go with my machine, I might reprise it in SS. If it's a total hunk of crap, there's always the new replacement.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
braze or solder with a MAPP gas torch? can't cost too much money. not sure what the temps are like in that muffler, however.
-tony
if you want to stick weld it, i'd suggest some backup strips on the inside. maybe some thin flats formed into circles, if i understand the question correctly.
Reply to
tony
You can try some 1/16" 6013 running at 25 to 30 amps. This will get pretty dicey. I doubt if you would be able to run anything more than some tack welds.
Ecnerwal wrote:
Reply to
Roy J
Another idea is to build the inlet and outlet out of slightly thicker metal with flanges so they can be attached with sheet metal screws. Welding on the can itself will take a better man than me. Maybe silver solder using a little propane torch.
I would go to your local scrap yard and look for some more suitable metal. My local scrap yard sells steel at 20 cents a lb. So some suitable steel would be less than a dollar. You might also look at your local Salvation Army store. If you could find something like a stainless steel thermos..........
Dan
"Zorro" wrote in message
Reply to
Dan Caster
Ear plugs are cheap and quick.
Reply to
R. Duncan
I use them. It's still irritating, and less loud would be less irritating.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
Ecnerwal wrote: I want to prototype a better muffler for a small engine(clip) ^^^^^^^^^^ I'm pretty sure you can buy tape that's made for repairing muffler leaks. A combination of tape and pop rivets will get you an assembly, though ugly, that will probably do the job.
Another possibility is to use soft solder on the joints that are not too close to the cylinder. I agree it will get hot, and not be very strong, but along with pop rivets, it will act as a sealant. Since the coffee cans have a lot of surface area and are in the open air, chances are they will not be hot enough to melt the solder.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Depending on the sort of stick machine you have, you may be able to get a tig torch for it. That would make the job doable. Getting decent pipe may be cheaper, though.
Or you could rent. Or you could have it done. Or you could put a copper shim under your weld in the hope that it will absorb the heat and that the weld will not stick to it. Or you could glue the whole set, or use rivets, screws, whatever...
Reply to
jerry_tig2003
You must have a LOT of time on your hands.
JTMcC.
Reply to
JTMcC
I built a muffler for an old welding machine using some 4" thin wall conduit scrap. I used the original rusted out muffler for the mount and it worked pretty well. It was quieter than the original, but somewhat heavier. Doesn't seem to be causing a problem. Good luck.. Jim
Reply to
Jim Seals
I built a muffler for an old welding machine using some 4" thin wall conduit scrap. I used the original rusted out muffler for the mount and it worked pretty well. It was quieter than the original, but somewhat heavier. Doesn't seem to be causing a problem. Good luck.. Jim
Reply to
Jim Seals
My brother and I built a muffler out of plywood one time that worked quite well. We used it at a lake cabin for several years till we sold the place.
Reply to
Jimmy
I have a miller thunderbolt ac machine and I have done just what you are trying to do. I have read that the 6013 was the rod to use for sheet metal, but i found that it burned through too often. I used 3/32 and 1/8 rods. I didn't know about the 1/16 at the time. I ended up using a 1/8 rod 6011 and running the temp as low as I could get it. I stitched it on opposing sides till I covered the area. You can weld the rims or the flat this way. I did both. I will say that a smaller rod will probably work better, but my muffler is still working with the unconventional stitching. The rod sticks badly and I had to get use to it before I could do it well. by the time I was through I could run a short stitch with out sticking. I used a dremel for the grinder and had a clean start and finish each time.
Scott Young
Reply to
Young

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