Two welders working on same structure.

I seem to recall having seen two or more welders working on the same
structure at the same time. Was that for real? Is that OK and normal?
If its ok, could I run different welders of different sizes and source
voltage at the same time? I've actually go three wire feed welders. An old
Harbor Freight blue box which I have not used in years, a Lincoln ProCore
120V I actually use all the time due to its small size and ease of
portability, and a Miller 212 (not autoset) I originally bought for aluminum
welding, but lately have been using more often for steel due to its decent
duty cycle. When I was putting together my welding table frame during the
weld out a couple times I thought it would have been nice for my son to burn
wire with the 212 while I burned wire with the ProCore.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Loading thread data ...
Electricity doesn't care, but check with the Union.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The Miller and the Lincoln should be fine, not sure about the Harbor Freight machine. The work terminals are not tied to safety ground on the wire feed machine schematics that I looked at, so you should be fine.
If you have an Ohmeter, unplug the machine and check from the work ground clamp to the ground pin on the power plug for the machine. You might check against the other two power plug pins too (with the power switch on), just for CYA.
BobH
Reply to
BobH
formatting link

Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I seem to recall having seen two or more welders working on the same structure at the same time. Was that for real? Is that OK and normal?
If its ok, could I run different welders of different sizes and source voltage at the same time? I've actually go three wire feed welders. An old Harbor Freight blue box which I have not used in years, a Lincoln ProCore 120V I actually use all the time due to its small size and ease of portability, and a Miller 212 (not autoset) I originally bought for aluminum welding, but lately have been using more often for steel due to its decent duty cycle. When I was putting together my welding table frame during the weld out a couple times I thought it would have been nice for my son to burn wire with the 212 while I burned wire with the ProCore.
***********
First off thanks guys. One thing I read seemed indicate a recommended independent earth ground was recommended from the work piece or welding table. I'm going to have to go back and read that again. Do any of you guys do that? I don't think I've ever noticed anybody do that before.
I got to thinking. I wonder if it would still work if somebody was welding with DCEP and another was using a DCEN process. Or if it would matter if somebody was using a DC process and another was simultaneously using an AC process. I know in communications we sometimes have AC and DC on the same wires doing different things.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
I don't run an earth ground on my work table, but that might be why my electronically controlled water softener loses it's mind when I do a lot of TIG welding. The manual that came with my welder recommends it.
Reply to
BobH
I don't run an earth ground on my work table, but that might be why my electronically controlled water softener loses it's mind when I do a lot of TIG welding. The manual that came with my welder recommends it.
************ The Lincoln info grounding sheet Jim Wilkins linked to above specifically mentions TIG noise as an issue and a reason for a work piece or weld table earth ground.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
So do the Miller docs. Until I put in the electronically controlled Water Softener, it didn't matter. Actually, they say to ground every piece of metal in the room.
Reply to
BobH

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.