Victor torch sets

Would someone have any opinion as to what what of the Victor torch
sets would be most suitable for general screwing around with welding,
and cutting, you know the kinds of things that I do. Would their
lowest set be sufficient?
Reply to
Ignoramus20172
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I have either sold or given away all but perhaps a few stray pieces all of my Victor stuff. In my opinion the smallest set is the best if you don't need the size to escape the heat. The smallest (well the one I gave to a friend) cutting head which will screw onto both handles with b hose fittings and a hose fittings and forward knobs has a tiny cutting tip with six preheat holes and is quite controllable. If you lay a piece of steel between your hands and the flame it helps. Otherwise I prefer a dedicated cutting torch. (not a screw together) with the larger cutting tips victor has quite a few steps in the escalation of oxygen hole. How worn the knob threading and how precise the regulators are have a lot to do with results of keeping a neutral flame. Then you can get into whether when you unscrew the handle which gas comes out of the center opening as one is called injector type and the other is called mixer type. to be honest I can't really tell the difference but the injector ones are supposed to be better for using the acetylene totally up in the tank. I would think all of the name brand ones are good, oxweld purox smith airco victor harris, the harris only has separate acetylene mixers for each tip in their largest version. I might hunt down a set of welding heads first and then hunt down a new handle but do what you wish. A lot of folks use larger sizes and rosebuds to heat for bending or something like that, that is where your large tanks will come in.
Fran
Reply to
fran...123
IGGY ! before you buy , let me offer to you a deal on a Victor cutting head and body I have . Welding tips are commonly available . It's a model CA2460 cutter head with a model 315FC handle/mixer . I will sell this for way less than list ! It's not new , but it's not far from it . Check the prices online and email me an offer .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus20172
Yes, I would like to find something used too, at a used price. I do not even know yet what I want, so I would prefer not to pay too much.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus20172
Sounds like Terry is going to hook you up. The 315 is a mighty fine head. If you want to do smaller, you'll come up with one of the smaller ones. They're about $500 new for the Journeyman. They're nice, but I bought one for $50 at a yard sale, head, hoses, and regulators. Didn't have all the tips, but those can be had on the cheap, too. New is nice, but used in good shape leaves you a lot of extra cash.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I like Victor. There are a couple of other good brand names, but Victor is most common, and you see the most of their stuff. They are also easy to get worked on if you have a problem, and some of the oddball brand names are hard to get repaired.
Since you don't know what you want, just look up the 315 head, and the other part Terry quoted. Ebay will give you a decent idea of prices. From there, you will evolve according to your uses.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Just a note sure stuff is easy to get worked on just bring it in to your local supply house and they send it out. The issue is when you find out a year later that the thing leaks there is no warranty on the work and the place you brought it in won't stand behind you with any form of remedy. More likely for a regulator, like the nice double stage one I had rebuilt than with knobs and threads and seats for a torch. But I would think to properly rebuild a torch the threading on the knobs and what they thread into has to be restored somehow not just new seats and seals. Of course they make the stuff shiny.
Fran
Reply to
fran...123
I've had the small Victor for years, just great for home/hobbyist use. The relatively small torch body is nice, cutting head with standard tip is good for 1/2", (1" in a pinch. Single stage regulator is not as smooth as the dual stage but not a big issue. Dual stage regular shines when you have significant gas usage and drain a tank substantially in one session, pretty unlikely in most hobbyist usage.
Ignoramus20172 wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Not ALL stuff is easy to get worked on. Just the more common brands. And yes, it does depend on the skill of the technician. The metal used on torches is relatively soft, and I would believe that it would be easy to deform or scar. But a good repair guy has experience and tricks to counter that.
What say ye, Ernie?
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
I use this little guy for most of my light cutting and Brazing and it works really well. Comes complete with Flash Back Arrestors (in the handle) Guages, hose, tips, rosebud, etc, etc.. Great friggin Torch and less than $300.00 all in. The torch head is about the 'smallest' you can get in the Victor Line and it's easily maneuverable and easy to hold. If you plan on cutting a lot of 'thick' stuff you may want to go up a torch or two....
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Reply to
Jman

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