Welding a nut

What is readily available (at least mail order) is unplated nuts. I know MSC has them, I'd think McMaster-Carr and Grainger would too.
Steve
Andrew H. Wakefield wrote:

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The former are indeed electrolytically plated with a *thin* zinc layer. The latter are "hot dip" galvanized with a thick layer of zinc.

Even the plated nuts fume, just not as much.

Auto parts store. Plated or galvanized nuts and bolts are the exception rather than the rule for automotive uses.
Gary
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Virtually any hardware you get from a hardware store will have some form of zinc plating. When this welded you'll see a stream of white smoke appear when the plating first burns off. This is bad stuff and you don't want to breath it in, so its best not to weld on zinc plated metal if you can find a way around it.
If I have a big piece to weld on I'll dunk it in muriatic acid first. This is cheap and available from most hardware stores however this is nasty stuff also, requiring gloves and a face shield during use. Also you can't really leave any of it around your shop as its fumes are extremely corrosive. If you're considering using it definitely search the web on "muriatic acid" to get some ideas on how to handle it safely.
When you dunk something with zinc plating in the acid it bubbles like hell at first while the plating gets eaten away. When the bubbling stops its down to the steel part and its time to get it out as the acid is now attacking the steel. Carefully rinse it well in very hot water and then dry it with compressed air and you're ready to weld.
However, if I just need to weld on nut on something, I'll usually use a stainless steel nut, also generally available from most hardware stores and you don't have to worry about this plating issue. The only downside of a stainless nut is that its not as strong or durable as a regular steel nut. However any nut you weld on like this is not going to be a strong as an unwelded nut due to the loss of heat treating, so I don't use welded nuts for anything that is highly stressed, or if I have to I would use an oversized nut for the job.
By the way if you're doing a lot of these, unplated grade 5 nuts (a better solution that a stainless nut) are available from industrial suppliers such as www.mscindustrial.com but you'll have to buy a box of them.
Good luck-
Paul T.
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You can avoid the muriatic acid with electrolysis. Qt. of water 2tbls of salt and 12volts DC stainless anode work is cathode, this will strip most conductive coatings. If you really feel creative mask the metal with nonconductive coating and etch designs into the surface of the work.

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I was just wondering... are there any metals that you _can't_ cut with a plasma cutter? if so, why not?
-sean
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Sean J Kelly wrote:

My guess is very conductive very low temp materials that might be hard to control. e.g. some of the melt in hot water type. But who would want to do that anyway. Or Indium...
Naturally there are Nasty stuff - Cadmium or Mercury ... or the stuff that a Plasma torch uses as the current source :-)
But for the most part, all metal that we normally work with can be cut.
Martin
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In article

All the non-exotic metals can be plasma cut.
Titanium produces BRIGHT white light when plasma cut.
Tungsten carbide cuts as easily as copper.
The more conductive a metal is, the higher the amperage it takes to cut in.
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 23:43:58 -0400 (EDT), Sean J Kelly

Probably - but Ti cuts pretty easily. We tried hacking up an inch cube of it, mainly to see how much the fire hazard was. No big deal at all - not even particularly bright. Whilst grinding it though, I've had (small) Ti dust fires.
There's a couple of feet of 4" Ti H-girder in the stockpile that would be useful forging stock, if only we could slice it up.
Plasma has problems with thermally conductive metals, so mere aluminium is surprisingly hard work. Maybe there's an exotic out there it would have trouble with.
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How come you don't use oxy-acetylene? It works well if you wish to reduce large pieces to smaller ones. It will embrittle the end surfaces which will require machining if you are doing high stress end result work. Ti work hardens which is why you would want to machine any critical surfaces.
On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 11:09:47 +0100, Andy Dingley

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how much the fire hazard was. No big deal at

Out of curiosity and not that I have a big 'burning desire' to try it, but how about plasma cutting Magnesium? That has to raise the hackles, if not the insurance rates...
Lawrence Farries
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"geoffrey gangel" wrote: (clip) If you really feel creative mask the metal with

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Sounds like fun. It could be used for decorating tool handle ferrules, for nameplates, and countless other things. I can hardly wait to try it. My woodlathe tools will never look the same.

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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 06:16:03 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"

http://codesmiths.com/shed/things/knives/cleaver /
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